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Topic: Diphtheria


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In the News (Thu 23 May 19)

  
  IMMUNIZATION: Diphtheria (adult)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Diphtheria is caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae, a bacteria that produces a toxin that kills tissues in the throat, nasal passage, lungs and heart.
When diphtheria infection is suspected, the patient is immediately admitted to the hospital and treated in an intensive care unit, as this infection is considered to be a true emergency.
Diphtheria vaccine is administered by intramuscular injection, usually in the large muscle of the shoulder.
tms.ecol.net /health/dipthold.htm   (263 words)

  
  Diphtheria - LoveToKnow 1911   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
DIPHTHERIA (from Sic6Epa, a skin or membrane), the term applied to an acute infectious disease, which is accompanied by a membranous exudation on a mucous surface, generally on the tonsils and back of the throat or pharynx.
Diphtheria, as at present understood, may be defined as sore throat in which the bacillus is found; if it cannot be found, the illness is regarded as something else, unless the clinical symptoms are quite unmistakable.
Diphtheria and croup are given both separately and together, showing the increasing transference from one to the other of late years.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Diphtheria   (4506 words)

  
 Diphtheria
Diphtheria is a bacterial infection that spreads easily and occurs quickly.
Diphtheria is rare in the United States and Europe, where health officials have been immunizing children against it for decades.
Children and adults with diphtheria are treated in a hospital.
kidshealth.org /parent/infections/bacterial_viral/diphtheria.html   (958 words)

  
 diphtheria - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Diphtheria, an acute and highly infectious disease, affecting children particularly, characterized by the formation of a false membrane in the...
Calf Diphtheria, acute, infectious, highly fatal disease of calves.
Calf diphtheria is also known as necrotic stomatitis, gangrenous stomatitis,...
encarta.msn.com /encnet/refpages/search.aspx?q=diphtheria   (124 words)

  
 DIPHTHERIA Pediatric Oncall
Diphtheria is an acute toxic infection caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae, an aerobic, non-encapsulated, gram positive bacillus.
Diphtheria occurs by entry of C.diphtheriae into the nose or mouth and after a 2-4 day incubation period, toxins are secreted which leads to toxin mediated tissue necrosis.
In tonsillar and pharyngeal diphtheria, sore throat is a universal early symptom.
www.pediatriconcall.com /fordoctor/casereports/diphtheria.asp   (1369 words)

  
 Diphtheria Facts
Diphtheria is a very contagious and potentially life-threatening infection that usually attacks the throat and nose.
Diphtheria was once one of the most common causes of death in children.
The diphtheria vaccine is usually given in a combination shot with tetanus and pertussis vaccines, known as DTP vaccine.
www.astdhpphe.org /infect/dip.html   (832 words)

  
 Respiratory Diphtheria Caused by Corynebacterium ulcerans -- Terre Haute, Indiana, 1996
Diphtheria is a potentially severe illness; among unvaccinated persons, the case- fatality rate may be 5%-10%, even with appropriate treatment.
Patients with severe diphtheria are at high risk for complications or death; therefore, to reduce morbidity and mortality, diphtheria antitoxin should be administered promptly based on the clinical presentation and presumptive diagnosis.
Diphtheria antitoxin is the treatment of choice, and prompt administration is the most important factor in reducing morbidity and mortality associated with mild or severe diphtheria cases.
wonder.cdc.gov /wonder/prevguid/m0051752/m0051752.asp   (1402 words)

  
 Virginia Hospital Center - Diphtheria
Diphtheria is an acute infectious disease caused by the toxin-producing bacteria Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
Diphtheria antitoxin is given as an intramuscular or intravenous injection as soon as the diagnosis is suspected.
Diphtheria is also a reportable disease, and any cases are often publicized in the newspaper or on television.
www.virginiahospitalcenter.com /adam/content.asp?genContentID=001608   (746 words)

  
 Diphtheria Summary
Diphtheria is a potentially fatal, contagious disease that usually involves the nose, throat, and air passages, but may also infect the skin.
Diphtheria is an upper respiratory tract illness characterized by sore throat, low-grade fever, and an adherent membrane (a pseudomembrane) on the tonsil(s), pharynx, and/or nose.
A diphtheria epidemic in the New England colonies between 1735 and 1740 was said to have killed as many as 80% of the children under 10 years of age in some towns.
www.bookrags.com /Diphtheria   (5284 words)

  
 Centers for Disease Control- Diptheria - Baby BagĀ® Online
Diphtheria is passed from person-to-person by coughing and sneezing, or in the case of skin diphtheria, from touching the open sores.
Diphtheria toxoid for children under seven years old should generally be administered in a combination with pertussis vaccine and tetanus toxoid as DTP vaccine.
The current rarity of diphtheria in the United States is due primarily to the high level of appropriate immunization in children, and to an apparent reduction in the poison-carrying strains of the bacteria.
www.babybag.com /articles/cdc_dip.htm   (3293 words)

  
 Diphtheria
Diphtheria is an acute bacterial disease that usually affects the tonsils, throat, nose or skin.
Diphtheria is transmitted to others through close contact with discharge from an infected person's nose, throat, skin, eyes and lesions.
Diphtheria vaccine is usually combined with tetanus vaccine and acellular pertussis vaccine to form a triple vaccine known as DTaP.
www.health.state.ny.us /diseases/communicable/diphtheria/fact_sheet.htm   (431 words)

  
 Diphtheria
CDC describes diphtheria as "an upper respiratory tract illness characterized by sore throat, low-grade fever, and an adherent membrane of the tonsil(s), pharynx, and/or nose".
The diphtheria toxin causes the death eukaryotic cells and tissues by inhibition protein synthesis in the cells.
The relative absence of diphtheria in the United States is due primarily to the high level of appropriate immunization in children, and to an apparent reduction in toxin-producing strains of the bacterium.
www.bact.wisc.edu /themicrobialworld/diphtheria.html   (2058 words)

  
 Diphtheria
Diphtheria is an acute respiratory infection caused by the diphtheria bacterium, Corynebacterium diphtheriae and its toxin.
Children are given the diphtheria vaccine together with vaccines against tetanus, whooping cough, polio and Hib as one combination vaccine (Pediacel), at the ages of two, three and four months.
A child is given a diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough and polio booster vaccine (Repevax) when he or she is five years old.
www.netdoctor.co.uk /travel/diseases/diphtheria.htm   (980 words)

  
 Child Health Library - Infectious Diseases - Diphtheria
Other complications of respiratory diphtheria are caused by the diphtheria toxin released in the blood, leading to heart failure.
With this type of diphtheria, the symptoms are usually milder and may include yellow spots or sores (similar to impetigo) on the skin.
Because diphtheria still prevails in underdeveloped countries, the vaccine remains necessary in case of exposure to a carrier visiting from abroad.
www.chp.edu /greystone/infectious/dphthria.php   (476 words)

  
 Diphtheria - Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
When a child is infected with diphtheria, the bacterium usually multiplies in the throat, leading to respiratory diphtheria.
Other complications of respiratory diphtheria are caused by the diphtheria toxin released in the blood, leading to heart failure.
Because diphtheria still prevails in underdeveloped countries, the vaccine remains necessary in case of exposure to a carrier visiting from abroad.
www.chop.edu /consumer/your_child/condition_section_index.jsp?id=-9192   (469 words)

  
 CDC - Yellow Book: [4] Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis - CDC Travelers' Health
Diphtheria is an acute bacterial disease caused by toxigenic strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae and occasionally C.
Diphtheria and pertussis are more frequent in parts of the world where vaccination levels are low.
Cutaneous diphtheria is characterized by a scaling rash or chronic nonhealing ulcers with a gray membrane.
www2.ncid.cdc.gov /travel/yb/utils/ybGet.asp?section=dis&obj=dtp.htm&cssNav=browseoyb   (2386 words)

  
 eMedicine - Diphtheria : Article by Cem S Demirci, MD
Diphtheria was no longer considered to be a child killer until large epidemics in several Eastern European countries drew attention to this forgotten disease in the 1990s.
Erasure edema associated with pharyngeal diphtheria obliterates the angle of the jaw, the borders of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, and the medial border of the clavicles.
Toxic cardiopathy occurs in approximately 10-25% of patients with diphtheria and is responsible for 50-60% of deaths.
www.emedicine.com /ped/topic596.htm   (6093 words)

  
 Diphtheria facts
Diphtheria is a disease caused by a bacteria, Corynebacterium diphtheriae, which invades the throat.
Diphtheria is usually spread through the airborne route or through contact with saliva or nasal secretions of an infected person.
Upon notification by a parent or health care worker that a child absent from the child care setting has contracted diphtheria, immediately contact the local health department for instructions on preventive measures to be taken.
www.familymanagement.com /childcare/facts/diphtheria.facts.html   (258 words)

  
 MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: Diphtheria
Diphtheria is an acute infectious disease caused by the bacteria Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
Diphtheria spreads through respiratory droplets (such as those produced by a cough or sneeze) of an infected person or someone who carries the bacteria but has no symptoms.
Diphtheria anti-toxin is given as a shot into a muscle or through an IV (intravenous line).
www.nlm.nih.gov /medlineplus/ency/article/001608.htm   (649 words)

  
 Disease Listing, Diphtheria, Technical Information | CDC Bacterial, Mycotic Diseases
Respiratory diphtheria presents as a sore throat with low-grade fever and an adherent membrane of the tonsils, pharynx, or nose.
Myocarditis, polyneuritis, and airway obstruction are common complications of respiratory diphtheria; death occurs in 5%-10% of respiratory cases.
Respiratory diphtheria has become a rare disease in the U.S. (0-5 cases per year.) An increasing proportion of cases occurs among older children and adults; in the prevaccination era, younger children were most often affected.
www.cdc.gov /ncidod/dbmd/diseaseinfo/diptheria_t.htm   (454 words)

  
 WHO | Diphtheria
Diphtheria is an infectious disease spreading from person to person by respiratory droplets from the throat through coughing and sneezing.
Symptoms range from a moderately sore throat to toxic life-threatening diphtheria of the larynx or of the lower and upper respiratory tracts.
Diphtheria is often complicated by diphtheric myocarditis (toxic damage to heart muscles) and neuritis (toxic damage to peripheral nerves).
www.who.int /mediacentre/factsheets/fs089/en   (272 words)

  
 Diphtheria: Prevention - MayoClinic.com
The three-in-one vaccine is known as the diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, or DTP, vaccine.
The diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccine is one of the childhood immunizations that doctors in the United States recommend begin during infancy.
Rarely, the diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccine causes serious complications in a child, such as an allergic reaction (hives or a rash develops within minutes of the injection), seizures or shock — complications which are treatable.
www.mayoclinic.com /health/diphtheria/DS00495/DSECTION=9   (487 words)

  
 WHO | Diphtheria
Diphtheria is caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
Diphtheria is transmitted from person to person through close physical and respiratory contact.
When diphtheria affects the throat and tonsils, the early symptoms are sore throat, loss of appetite, and slight fever.
www.who.int /immunization/topics/diphtheria/en/index1.html   (426 words)

  
 Diphtheria
The bacterium that caused diphtheria was first described by Klebs in 1883, and was cultivated by Loeffler in 1884, who applied Koch's postulates and properly identified Corynebacterium diphtheriae as the agent of the disease.
In parts of the world where diphtheria still occurs, it is primarily a disease of children, and most individuals who survive infancy and childhood have acquired immunity to diphtheria.
The diphtheria toxin is a two component bacterial exotoxin synthesized as a single polypeptide chain containing an A (active) domain and a B (binding) domain.
textbookofbacteriology.net /diphtheria.html   (2891 words)

  
 Home | aHealthyme.com
Pharyngeal diphtheria gets its name from the pharynx, which is the part of the upper throat that connects the mouth and nasal passages with the voice box.
Because diphtheria must be treated as quickly as possible, doctors usually make the diagnosis on the basis of the visible symptoms without waiting for test results.
Diphtheria is a serious disease requiring hospital treatment in an intensive care unit if the patient has developed respiratory symptoms.
www.ahealthyme.com /article/gale/100084464   (1727 words)

  
 Diphtheria
Diphtheria poses a threat to U.S. citizens who may not be fully immunized and who travel to other countries or have contact with immigrants or international travelers coming to the United States.
The diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccine is one of the childhood immunizations that doctors in the United States recommend begin during infancy.
Rarely, the diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccine causes serious complications in a child, such as an allergic reaction (hives or a rash develops within minutes of the injection), seizures or shock — complications which are treatable.
www.cnn.com /HEALTH/library/DS/00495.html   (2019 words)

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