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Topic: Diptera


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  Diptera
Brachyceran Diptera in Cretaceous ambers and Mesozoic diversification of the Eremoneura.
Ovchinnikova, O.G. Musculature of the male genitalia of Brachycera-Orthorrhapha (Diptera).
Yeates, D.K. The cladistics and classification of the Bombyliidae (Diptera: Asiloidea).
tolweb.org /tree?group=Diptera&contgroup=Endopterygota   (2007 words)

  
  Diptera
Brachyceran Diptera in Cretaceous ambers and Mesozoic diversification of the Eremoneura.
Ovchinnikova, O.G. Musculature of the male genitalia of Brachycera-Orthorrhapha (Diptera).
Yeates, D.K. The cladistics and classification of the Bombyliidae (Diptera: Asiloidea).
www2.ncsu.edu /unity/lockers/ftp/bwiegman/fly_html/diptera.html   (1597 words)

  
 Diptera - Fly Fishing and Fly Tying Resource
A new Material Database Search now exists on Diptera which allows you to enter a list of materials and the search will return any flies that are tied with those materials.
A new Pattern Search now exists on Diptera which allows you to search for a full name or part name of a fly, the search will return any flies that meet your search criteria..
A new Hook Equivalent Database now exists on Diptera which allows you to enter a model of hook and search for other manufacturers hook equivalents.
www.diptera.co.uk   (175 words)

  
 Diptera at AllExperts
Diptera (di - two, ptera - wings), or true flies, is the order of insects possessing only a single pair of wings on the mesothorax; the metathorax bears a pair of drumstick like structures called the halteres, the remnants of the hind wings.
The Diptera, in particular the Culicidae, are of phenomenal historical and current importance as disease transmitters.
Diptera may be predaceous, herbivorous, endo- and ectoparasitic, saprophagous, necrophagous, etc. Various species are secondarily wingless (especially in the superfamily Hippoboscoidea, or those that are inquilines in social insect colonies).
en.allexperts.com /e/d/di/diptera.htm   (1122 words)

  
 Diptera :: Insecta : Gourt
Diptera (di - two, ptera - wings), or true flies, is the order of insects in which there is only a single pair of wings on the mesothorax; the metathorax bears a pair of drumstick like structures called the halteres, the remnants of the hind wings.
The Diptera, in particular the Culicidae, are of phenomenal historical and current importance as disease transmitters.
Diptera may be predaceous, herbivorous, endo- and ectoparasitic, saprophagous, necrophagous, etc. Various species are secondarily wingless (especially in the superfamily Hippoboscoidea, or those that are inquilines in social insect colonies).
science.gourt.com /Biology/Flora-and-Fauna/Animalia/Arthropoda/Insecta/Diptera.html   (998 words)

  
 Flies of BC   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In entomology, none of these are flies proper, insects of the Order Diptera, which are often referred to as "true flies" or "two-winged flies" because they never have more than one pair of wings, those on the middle segment of the thorax.
Diptera are primarily aerial insects and the mesothorax, which bears the only pair of wings, has come to dominate the thorax -- the prothorax and metathorax are greatly reduced.
Those groups, mostly in the higher Diptera, that evolved towards drier habitats live in soil and sand, in leaf litter, under bark, in wood and fungi, in decomposing material or inside growing plant tissues such as roots, stems, fruits and leaves.
www.geog.ubc.ca /biodiversity/efauna/FliesofBC.html   (1804 words)

  
 Nematocera types in CNC
Type material of the nematocerous Diptera housed in the Canadian National Collection, as of 31 December 1987, is cataloged.
Following his departure little progress was made on the development of the Diptera section until G.E. Shewell was brought on staff in l937.
Other internationally known dipterists who worked for shorter periods in the Diptera Section of the CNC are W.R. Thompson (Tachinidae), W. Hennig (Acalyptratae), H.C. Huckett (Muscidae and Anthomyiidae), and K.A. Spencer (Agromyzidae).
www.nadsdiptera.org /Catalogs/CNCtypes/Part1.htm   (962 words)

  
 ORDER DIPTERA. THE TRUE FLIES
Diptera were quite abundant in this locality (uncommon situation for the Triassic, see below) and were estimated as about 280 specimens or 5 % of total number of collected insects due to numerous aquatic immatures which are not described yet; possibly some of these larvae do not belong to dipterans at all.
At the same time bibionomorphan Diptera were rather diverse in the Triassic represented by Procramptonomyiidae (most primitive Bibionomorpha), Alinkidae (described as Brachycera but plausible Bibionomorpha close to Procramptonomyiidae), Paraxymyiidae (initial group for Sciaroidea), Protorhyphidae (ancestral to Anisopodidae and Brachycera) and Crosaphididae (in some respects more advanced than some extant members of Bibionomorpha).
Kovalev (1984) distinguished two stages of the Diptera fauna formation during the Jurassic: the Early Liassic (as reflected by the assemblage of Sogyuty in Central Asia) and the rest of the period.
palaeoentomolog.ru /New/diptera.html   (4147 words)

  
 The Diptera of Rye Bay
Of the 6,095 species and 1,317 Diptera recorded so far, the most important are those considered to be rare.
Most habitats contain an abundance of Diptera, the two-winged flies and, with its considerable habitat diversity, the Rye Bay area is particularly rich.
The richest habitats for diptera in the Rye Bay area are the wetlands with a good growth of emergent vegetation providing the flowers with their nectar and pollen that many flies need during their adult lives.
home.clara.net /yates/diptera.html   (4734 words)

  
 FLIES
Diptera is the name given to true flies, the name means two wings and it is this feature which differentiates them from other types of fly such as mayflies and alder flies which have four wings.
In Diptera the hind wings have become reduced to a pair of small knob-like structures called halteres.
Diptera usually exhibit four larval stages although in many Cyclorrhapha only three are visible as the fourth larval stage develops within the exuvium (hardened cuticle) of the third larval stage.
www.roberth.u-net.com /Diptera.htm   (630 words)

  
 [No title]
Descriptors: genetics, Diptera, Scathophaga stercoraria, yellow dung fly, hind tibia length, skeletal system, body size, development time, diapause induction, environmental influence, genetic correlation, heritability, quantitative genetic estimates, consistency, cytogenetics, bones, joints, fasciae, connective and adipose tissue, physiology and biochemistry, comparative and experimental morphology, physiology and pathology.
Reeves, W.K.; Mccullough, S.D. Laboratory susceptibility of Wyeomyia smithii (Diptera: Culicidae) to Ascogregarina taiwanensis (Apicomplexa: Lecudinidae).
From these experiments, we conclude that physical host fruit stimuli known to be important in host selection in Rhagoletis flies, including colour and shape, also enhance oogenesis in the first egg maturation cycle, and that enhancement of oogenesis via these stimuli requires neither nutritional input from the fruit nor prior egg deposition.
www.nal.usda.gov /awic/pubs/Labinsects/Otherdiptera.htm   (8552 words)

  
 MavicaNET - Flies (Diptera)
"Diptera systematist" is here defined as one who has been either an author or co-author of a new taxon of Diptera.
The almost 300,000 specimens in the collection are continually being maintained and used as a source of reference and study material for the collection curator as well as others who may wish to borrow the material.
The primary type material of the family Tachinidae (Diptera) housed in the Canadian National Collection of Insects, as of 31 December 1994, is cataloged.
www.mavicanet.com /lite/bul/6734.html   (913 words)

  
 AK Diptera Projekte: Sammlung Ketel 2000
In 1998 the Deutsches Entomologisches Institut (DEI) acquired the previously unknown Diptera collection of Dr Carl Friedrich Ketel (1861-1906), a secondary school teacher who was active in his spare time as a botanist and entomologist in Mecklenburg and west Pomerania (Vorpommern).
The structure and the original arrangement of his Diptera collection are described, and then comes a review of his localities and of the abbreviations that he used for them on his original data-labels.
Revision of the Diptera collection has shown that 25 of the species collected by Ketel were not previously known from Germany [7 Anthomyiidae, 1 Asilidae, 2 Chamaemyiidae, 1 Empididae, 1 Ephydridae, 1 Muscidae, 1 Mycetophilidae, 1 Opomyzidae, 1 Phoridae, 2 Psilidae, 1 Scathophagidae, 1 Scatopsidae, 1 Sciomyzidae, 1 Sepsidae, 1 Tachinidae and 2 Trichoceridae].
www.ak-diptera.de /projekte/samketel00.php3   (1200 words)

  
 O. Orkin Insect Zoo: Student Resources Component--Diptera
The order Diptera is pronounced "DIP-ter-a." The name Diptera is taken from the Greek words: "di," which means two, and "ptera," which means wings.
Diptera and Coleoptera are the oldest names of orders still in use.
In Diptera, the word "fly" is always written separately from the rest of the common name.
insectzoo.msstate.edu /Students/diptera.html   (2996 words)

  
 Diptera
Diptera are commonly occurring group of insects in the beds of the Coprolitic Horizon.
The most predominant are the specimens of the moisture-loving Diptera; sciarid flies (Sciaridae), whose larvae develop in the forest leaf litter, fungus or in roting timber (Cosmowska - Ceramowitz 2001).
They are the largest family of fossil Diptera with 344 species described in 12 genera.
www2.arnes.si /~jzaloh/diptera.htm   (577 words)

  
 Order Diptera
It is evident that the Diptera or two-winged flies are by far the most diverse order of insects in fresh water; they are in fact the most diversified of any major taxon of freshwater organisms.
The separation of the Diptera, as potential or actual inhabitants of deep water, from the other orders of immature aquatic insects is justified by the fact that an elaborate classification of lake types has been built upon the ecology of the deep-water Chironomidae (true midges) and their associated organisms.
The question as to why, among all the aquatic insects with gills, this family of Diptera has alone significantly exploited the depths of lakes is of considerable interest.
lakes.chebucto.org /ZOOBENTH/BENTHOS/xii.html   (1731 words)

  
 Diptera   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The name Diptera is derived from the Greek words "di" meaning two and "ptera" meaning wings, which refers to the fact that true flies have only a single pair of wings.
The Diptera probably have a greater economic impact on humans than any other group of insects.
Flies may be pests of agricultural plants or transmit diseases to humans and domestic animals.
www.science.mcmaster.ca /Biology/insect/diptera.htm   (623 words)

  
 D i p t e r a : T r u e F l i e s   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
This sight focuses on all the steps of a Diptera life cycle: egg, larva, pupa, and adult!!!!This sight got a five mainly because it has the most elaborate and useful information to apply to anything about the life cycle.
The next section has all the families that belong to the Diptera family; this is very useful because there are a lot of different types of flies and can narrow down your search if you’re researching a specific type of Diptera.
Facts About Diptera - Rating:{♥ ♥ ♥} This is a very short site; it has your basic information about the flies and does a good job at describing the characteristics of the flies.
www.kn.att.com /wired/fil/pages/listdipterala.html   (1617 words)

  
 Diptera Types
Diptera type specimens in the Museum of Entomology (FSCA) number over 1,500 nominal taxa, including at least 247 holotypes, 4 neotypes, and 80 allotypes, with almost all of the remainder being paratypes.
Specimens that have been determined to be, or are suspected of representing manuscript names will be maintained in the Diptera Types Catalogue with notes to that effect in the hope that this will spur specialists in the relevant taxa to investigate further.
Also, the large Diptera holdings of the Museum have not yet been fully inventoried, especially the unincorporated pinned adults, slide-mounted specimens, specimens in alcohol, and some families of Nematocera.
www.fsca-dpi.org /Diptera/DipteraTypes.htm   (710 words)

  
 Diptera
Adults may feed little or not at all, or they may be predators of other insects or molluscs, take pollen and nectar, or feed upon the blood of vertebrates.
Diptera communities are usually very complex in all types of aquatic systems with many species separated by habitat, habits, season, and trophic role.
Diptera occur in deep lakes, saline and thermal waters and make up the majority of marine insects species.
www.esg.montana.edu /aim/diptera/diptera.html   (1204 words)

  
 FLYTREE - Assembling the Tree of Life for Diptera
With nearly 150,000 described species, flies (the insect order Diptera), are among the most diverse groups of living organisms on the planet.
This diversity transcends simple species numbers and is demonstrated in the great breadth of morphological, ecological, and behavioral variation found in the group.
The FLYTREE project is an international research collaboration funded by the US National Science Foundation, to elaborate and discover the details of fly relationships and diversity with the ultimate goal of providing a newly resolved phylogeny for this major branch of the Tree of Life.
www.inhs.uiuc.edu /cee/FLYTREE   (147 words)

  
 Insect Orders
Diptera are usually winged, but have only one pair of wings with few veins.
Immature Diptera have mouthparts, modified for sucking or for piercing and sucking.
True flies or Diptera occur in many shapes and sizes and are a very important group.
insects.tamu.edu /fieldguide/orders/diptera.html   (240 words)

  
 CNC - Diptera (Flies)
The Diptera collection is considered one of the strongest segments of the Canadian National Collection of Insects.
Approximately 65% of the collection is curated to the level of species or species group, and over 80% of the collection is curated to the genus level.
Nearly 5000 primary types reside in the Diptera collection, in part through the acquisition of the Mesnil, Reinhard, Hull, W.R. Thompson and Garrett collections, and these types are catalogued in a series of hardcopy and online publications (see Diptera Types in the Canadian National Collection of Insects).
res2.agr.gc.ca /ecorc/cnc/dipter_e.htm   (388 words)

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