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Topic: Disability etiquette


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  Disability - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Many books on disability and disability rights point out that the disabled community is one of very few groups of people that one doesn't have to be born into, as disability can develop later in life as well.
Disabled activists, such as Tom Shakespeare (2002), argue that although their impairments may cause them pain or discomfort, what really dis-ables people as members of society is a socio-cultural system which does not recognise their right to genuine equality.
The disability rights movement began in the 1970s and is largely responsible for the shift toward independent living and accessibility.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Disability   (1239 words)

  
 Disability etiquette -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Typically, these rules, based upon social norms, are not codified in criminal or civil (The collection of rules imposed by authority) law; but rather are enforced on an individual level by fear of community disapproval.
Most disability etiquette guidelines seem to be predicated on a simple dictate: “Do not assume…” They are written to address real and perceived shortcomings in how society as a whole treats people with disabilities.
“Disability etiquette” exists to draw attention to common assumptions and misconceptions through the provision of guidelines that contradict them.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/d/di/disability_etiquette.htm   (437 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Such as: - "person with cerebral palsy" - "person with a vision disability" - "person with a hearing disability" - "person with a disability" However, when a term has gained intrinsic strength among a large group of persons with a specific disability, the personhood rule may be suspended in favor of political or cultural preferences.
In conducting interviews with persons with severe communication disabilities for this handbook, the author was surprised by the ease with which he was able to understand what people were saying after two to four minutes of attentive listening.
Etiquette 1.Take time, relax, and listen Be patient, give the person the time they desire to be able to speak for themselves.
www.empowermentzone.com /etiqbook.txt   (6751 words)

  
 Disability Services - Disability Etiquette
The general rule of thumb is to treat a person with a disability with the same respect and consideration you would like others to extend to you.
It is best not to mention the person's disability unless he or she talks about it or it is relevant to the conversation.
Do not assume a patronizing conversational style, talking to the person with the disability as though he or she were a child (unless it IS a child!) Never pat the head of a person with a disability or express pity for his or her condition.
www.lvc.edu /disability-services/etiquette.aspx   (482 words)

  
 OKLAHOMA DISABILITY ETIQUETTE HANDBOOK
The OKLAHOMA DISABILITY ETIQUETTE HANDBOOK was developed in response to the need to educate employers about ways to relate to people with disabilities in the workplace after the passage of the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act.
A disability is a condition caused by accident, trauma, genetics or disease, which may limit a person’s mobility, hearing, vision, speech or mental functions.
The disability is there; the individual has simply learned to adapt by using his or her skills and knowledge, just as everybody adapts to being tall, short, bald or blond, etc.
www.state.ok.us /~ohc/_ohc/deh_txt.htm   (12293 words)

  
 Easter Seals: Disability Etiquette
People with disabilities are entitled to the same courtesies you would extend to anyone, including personal privacy.
When talking with someone who has a disability, speak directly to him or her, rather than through a companion who may be along.
If you would like to help someone with a disability, ask if he or she needs it before you act, and listen to any instructions the person may want to give.
www.easterseals.com /site/PageServer?pagename=ntl_etiquette   (586 words)

  
 Dickinson Disability Services
There are approximately 49 million Americans with disabilities that limit their mobility, communication and independent travel.
Remember, the only difference between you and the person with the disability are his or her physical limitations.
Remember, individuals with disabilities want to be treated just as you want to be treated, with respect and compassion.
www.dickinson.edu /departments/disability/etiquette.html   (927 words)

  
 GDA Product 3   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
If a person hasn’t had much experience being around someone who is disabled, or if they feel uncomfortable about disability, it’s important to realize that disability is but one small fact about a person among a myriad of others.
A disability such as Parkinson’s disease may be caused by a sickness, but it is not a disease itself, nor is the person necessarily chronically ill. People with disabilities should never be referred to as patients, except when specifically referring to a doctor-patient relationship.
The individual with a disability senses that the other person is comfortable in the presence of an individual with a disability; is focused on the individual, not the disability; is willing to extend to that individual the same courtesies that the other would extend to those who are not disabled.
www.disabilitylearningservices.com /unit03.htm   (3523 words)

  
 Disability Etiquette
Disability is a fact of life for 57 million Americans.
Oftentimes, persons without disabilities hesitate from interacting with persons with disabilities for fear of insulting the person or embarrassing themselves.
Use language that preserves the person’s dignity and does not portray the individual as a “victim” or someone to be “pitied.” Language such as “person with epilepsy” (not “epileptic”) is appropriate because it places the focus on the person, and not upon his or her disability.
www.indygov.org /eGov/Mayor/Diversity/MACD/Resources/etiquette.htm   (795 words)

  
 Disability Etiquette Handbook   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Reasonable accommodations enhance the opportunity for qualified persons with disabilities who may not otherwise be considered for reasons unrelated to actual job requirements to be or remain employed.
Don't hire a person with a disability if that person is at significant risk of substantial harm to the health and safety of the public and there is no reasonable accommodation to reduce the risk or harm.
Don't hire a person with a disability who is not qualified to perform the essential functions of the job even with a reasonable accommodation.
users.crocker.com /~amedpub/rc21d/etiquette.html   (2348 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
I bet she is deprived of a lot things." Such comments most likely are annoying to a person with a disability as well as to any companion who may be accompanying them.
Avoid referring to a person with a disability as "one of them" rather than "one of us." Making such a distinction does not foster acceptance of persons with disabilities.
Proper Etiquette to Use When Interacting With Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired * When approaching a person who is blind or visually impaired, identify yourself and anyone else who may be accompanying you.
www.uni.edu /ada/pow0696.txt   (919 words)

  
 Etiquette   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Treat someone with a disability as you would like to be treated and you can't go wrong.
Do not park in a disabled parking space unless you have the proper identification and have a disability that warrants you to park there.
Please use terms such as physically disabled or "He/she uses a wheelchair..." Remember they are people first and disabled second.
inlove.org /etiquette.htm   (348 words)

  
 LII: Law about...Disability   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Disability law is largely regulated by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990.
Owners are further required to make reasonable exceptions in their housing policies so as to afford equal housing opportunities to those with disabilities.
Finally, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act requires public schools to make available to alleligible children with disabilities a free appropriate public education in the least restricitve environment according to their needs.
www.law.cornell.edu /topics/disability.html   (526 words)

  
 Facts on Aging: A Look at Disability Etiquette   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Generally, the preferred term is a "person with a disability." For example, a person is not "an epileptic" but rather "a person with a disability" or "a person who has epilepsy." Use language that conveys respect.
A disability is a condition caused by an accident, trauma, genetics, or disease which may limit a person’s mobility, hearing, vision, speech, or mental function.
People with disabilities do not want to be recipients of charity or pity; they want equality.
www.state.il.us /aging/1news_pubs/onage61.htm   (432 words)

  
 Disability Etiquette
When talking with a person with a disability, speak directly to that person rather than through a companion or sign language interpreter.
Address people who have disabilities by their first names only when extending the same familiarity to all others.
For those who do lip-read, be sensitive to their needs by placing yourself so that you face the light source and keeping hands, cigarettes, and food away from your mouth when speaking.
www.ualr.edu /dssdept/etiquette.html   (489 words)

  
 Etiquette guides for life, career, business, dining, manners not rudeness
Disability Etiquette Handbook that has earned very high praise.
etiquette tips and the top tip of all: treat everyone as you'd like to be treated yourself.
Disability etiquette means not using words with negative connotations and using more affirmative, more positive words with dignity.
www.rudebusters.com /etiquet.htm   (1341 words)

  
 Disability Etiquette   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Address people with disabilities by their first names only when extending that same familiarity to all others.
Bear in mind that people with disabilities treat their chairs as extensions of their bodies; so do people with guide dogs and help dogs.
Tap a person who has a hearing disability on the shoulder or wave your hand to get his or her attention.
www.pitt.edu /~kwb4/zetetic/essays/diset.html   (380 words)

  
 Disability Etiquette - Special Education
Disability etiquette is not that difficult to do.
Disability etiquette begins by treating a person with a disability like a person.
A disability does not mean you have to be single all your life.
www.bellaonline.com /articles/art7003.asp   (393 words)

  
 etiquette - Student Disability Resources
People with disabilities prefer that you focus on their abilities, not their disabilities.
The term disabled people is acceptable, but this term still defines people as disabled first and people second.
Treat people with disabilities with the same respect and consideration that you have for everyone else.
sdr.csumb.edu /Etiquette/Etiquette.htm   (608 words)

  
 Job Accommodation Network   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
This publication is funded under a contract supported by the Office of Disability Employment Policy of the U.S. Department of Labor, contract #J-9-M-2-0022.
When talking to a person with a disability, look at and speak directly to that person, rather than through a companion or attendant.
To accommodate individuals with learning disabilities and vision impairments when using presentation slides, be sure to explain what is on the slide.
www.jan.wvu.edu /media/etipresent.html   (520 words)

  
 Disability Etiquette   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
When EPVA helped to get the The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 passed, it was with the goal of integrating people with disabilities into all aspects of American life, particularly the workplace and the marketplace.
If you ask about their disability, they may feel like you are treating them as a disability, not as a human being.
Say "person with a disability" rather than "disabled person." Say "people with disabilities" rather than "the disabled." For specific disabilities, saying "person with Tourette’s Syndrome" or "person who has cerebral palsy" is usually a safe bet.
www.mercercountycareercenter.com /workforceprofessionals_disetiquette.htm   (641 words)

  
 Unit_3
Greetings: The standard should be to extend the same courtesies to individuals with disabilities that would be extended to other people--shaking hands with individuals who cannot see, who have short arms, who use prostheses, or touching the arm or hand of individuals who cannot raise a hand in greeting.
How close you sit to an individual and what you do while you interact with him or her sends a message -- you are interested or not interested, you feel comfortable or uncomfortable.
When talking to a person with a disability, look at and speak directly to that person, rather than through a companion who may be along.
www.state.ia.us /government/dhr/pd/eworkshop/Unit_3.htm   (3492 words)

  
 Disability Etiquette   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The following are some guidelines that should be used when speaking with or making reference to a person with a disability.
They refer to themselves as Deaf with a capitol "D" and may be offended by the term "hearing impaired." Use the term "hard of hearing" to refer to people who have hearing loss but communicate in spoken language.
Stairs, narrow doorways and curbs are handicaps imposed upon people with disabilities who use wheelchairs.
cpcug.org /user/houser/section508/disabilityetiquette.html   (324 words)

  
 RAMP - Disability Etiquette
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 was conceived with the goal of integrating people with disabilities into all aspects of American life, particularly the workplace and the marketplace.
Say "person with a disability" rather than "disabled person." Say "people with disabilities" rather than "disabled people." For specific disabilities, saying "person with Tourette Syndrome" or "person who has cerebral palsy" is usually a safe bet.
This information was obtained from the Disability Etiquette Handbook published by the Eastern Paralyzed Veterans Associated.
rampcil.org /Etiquette   (434 words)

  
 The Winchester Star-Disability Etiquette Manuals Answer Awkward Questions   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
“We are not disabled people; we definitely are not handicapped people,” said Shick, who has been visually impaired most of her life.
The Eastern Paralyzed Veterans Association calls its guide “Disability Etiquette,” using a term citizens might keep in mind when dealing with people with disabilities, said Alix Cooper, board member of The Arc of Northern Shenandoah Valley, an advocacy group for people with mental retardation.
Cooper, like many people with disabilities or their caregivers, stressed the importance of friendliness and respect.
www.winchesterstar.com /TheWinchesterStar/030721/Area_disability.asp   (494 words)

  
 DRES - Providing Disability Services at the University of Illinois
Language and/or behavior by instructors that serves to reaffirm inaccurate assumptions about persons with disabilities may cause offense, and serve to substantially impede the full and equal class participation of students with disabilities in classroom activities.
By changing how you communicate with people with disabilities, and by modifying a few features of your environment, you can show that you are committed to teaching a diverse population of students, including those with disabilities.
For further information on proper etiquette for discussing or interacting with people with various types of disabilities, please contact DRES at 333-4603.
www.disability.uiuc.edu /page.php?id=60   (331 words)

  
 Disability Etiquette
The City of San Antonio, Texas and their Disability Advisory Committee prepared the Disability Etiquette Handbook.
People with disabilities do not like to be perceived as victims for the rest of their lives, long after any victimization has occurred.
Unacceptable: Afflicted: a disability is not an affliction.
www.cityofsacramento.org /adaweb/learning_about_disabilities.htm   (3189 words)

  
 Disability Etiquette
Speak directly to a person with a disability, rather than through a companion.
Put people first, not their disability - Say "person with a disability," "visitor who is deaf," or ‘‘visitor who uses a wheelchair.’’ Also see: People First Language.
Remember to distinguish between "disabilities" and "handicaps" - A "disability" applies to a person.
www.communitygateway.org /faq/etiquette.htm   (400 words)

  
 Job Accommodation Network   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Center on Disability Studies (CDS) is a University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents recognized Center focused upon development and conduct of interdisciplinary education/training, research/demonstration and evaluation, and university and community service.
The purpose of the Disability Statistics Center is to produce and disseminate statistical information on disability and the status of people with disabilities in American Society and to establish and monitor indicators of how conditions are changing over time to meet their health, housing, economic and social needs.
Persons with disabling conditions, care givers, family and friends as well as non-disabled community members are encouraged to learn about the disability issues affecting themselves and the community at large.
www.jan.wvu.edu /links/disres.htm   (4107 words)

  
 Easi GUide to Disability Etiquette
One of the most difficult barriers people with disabilities face is negative attitudes and perceptions of other people.
Disability is often perceived as a yes-or-no proposition.
ASSISTANCE: Lab and teaching assistants should be prepared to help a person with a disability in a number of different ways, according to the type and severity of the disability.
www.rit.edu /~easi/pubs/ezeticut.htm   (833 words)

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