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Topic: Disease


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In the News (Mon 18 Dec 17)

  
  Disease definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of popular medical terms
Disruption sequence: The events that occur when a fetus that is developing normally is subjected to a destructive agent such as the rubella (German measles) virus.
Celiac Disease - Learn about Celiac disease and the immunological (allergic) reaction within the inner lining of the small intestine to proteins (gluten).
Crohn's Disease - Learn about Crohn’s Disease and the causes, symptoms (including abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, fever, rectal bleeding, and more) and treatment of this chronic inflammatory disease of the intestines.
www.medterms.com /script/main/art.asp?articlekey=3011   (217 words)

  
  Graves' Disease   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Graves' Disease is a type of autoimmune disease that causes over-activity of the thyroid gland, causing hyperthyroidism.
Graves’ Disease also tends to affect women between the ages of 20 and 40, although it occurs in infants, children, and the elderly.
Graves’ Disease is the only kind of hyperthyroidism that is associated with swelling of the tissue around the eyes and bulging of the eyes.
www.4woman.gov /faq/graves.htm   (999 words)

  
  Fifth Disease
Fifth disease begins with a low-grade fever, headache, and mild cold-like symptoms (a stuffy or runny nose).
Because the rash of fifth disease is an immune reaction (a defense response launched by the body against foreign substances like germs) that occurs after the infection has passed, a child is usually not contagious once the rash appears.
Fifth disease is caused by a virus, and it cannot be treated with antibiotics used to treat bacterial infections.
www.kidshealth.org /parent/infections/bacterial_viral/fifth.html   (1289 words)

  
  Disease - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A disease or medical condition is an abnormality of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person afflicted or those in contact with the person.
The subject of systematic classification of diseases is referred to as nosology.
Other diseases, such as cancer and heart disease are not considered to be due to infection, although micro-organisms may play a role, and cannot be spread from person to person.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Disease   (863 words)

  
 Crohn's disease - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Crohn's disease is a disease of unknown causation.
Crohn's disease has a bimodal distribution in incidence as a function of age: the disease tends to strike people in their teens and twenties, and people in their fifties through seventies.
Inflammatory bowel diseases were described by Giovanni Battista Morgagni (1682-1771), by Polish surgeon Antoni Leśniowski in 1904 (leading to the use of the eponym "Leśniowski-Crohn disease" in Poland) and by Scottish physician T. Kennedy Dalziel in 1913.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Crohn's_disease   (4346 words)

  
 Fifth Disease
Fifth disease begins with a low-grade fever, headache, and mild cold-like symptoms (a stuffy or runny nose).
Because the rash of fifth disease is an immune reaction (a defense response launched by the body against foreign substances like germs) that occurs after the infection has passed, a child is usually not contagious once the rash appears.
Fifth disease is caused by a virus, and it cannot be treated with antibiotics used to treat bacterial infections.
kidshealth.org /parent/infections/bacterial_viral/fifth.html   (1289 words)

  
 Prion disease - Genetics Home Reference
Mutations in the PRNP gene cause prion disease.
Familial forms of prion disease are caused by inherited mutations in the PRNP gene; however, only a small percentage of cases run in families.
Familial forms of prion disease are inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, which means one copy of the altered gene in each cell is sufficient to cause the disorder.
ghr.nlm.nih.gov /condition=priondisease   (866 words)

  
 Disease
In parts of the upper Midwest and Northeast, half of all adult ticks may be carriers of Lyme disease, putting people in these areas at great risk.
The name is a misnomer because the disease now occurs in almost every state in the continental U.S., Canada, Mexico, Central America, and South America.
The disease is present in almost all countries in the tropics and subtropics.
www.deet.com /content/htm/disease.htm   (646 words)

  
 Disease during the Industrial Revolution
Disease was a constant threat during the Industrial Revolution.
Changes in the way that people lived and the conditions in which they worked led to disease being able to spread much more rapidly, and new forms of disease emerged that were as deadly as any killer that had been before.
In many slums the same water supply was infected with human sewage as toilet facilities were often inadequate and sometimes consisted of a toilet blcok that was emptied irregularly: meaning that when it rained, the waste may overflow into the gutter and therefore into the rivers and streams.
www.schoolshistory.org.uk /IndustrialRevolution/disease.htm   (465 words)

  
 Alzheimer disease - Genetics Home Reference
Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain that causes gradual loss of memory, judgment, and ability to function.
About 75 percent of Alzheimer disease cases are classified as sporadic, which means they occur in people with no history of the disorder in their family.
The early-onset forms of Alzheimer disease (types 1, 3, and 4) are inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, which means one copy of the altered gene in each cell is sufficient to cause the disorder.
ghr.nlm.nih.gov /condition=alzheimerdisease   (954 words)

  
 Disease - Uncyclopedia
Occasionally, diseases are created when single-cell organisms evolve, but the most rampant diseases come from a higher process: What scientists call "FDA executives wanting more money from pill sales".
Disease, sickness, illness, malady: the suffering of a being when its body ceases functioning smoothly and begins to falter.
Since this Theory the Second is based on firm and solid evidence, it is termed the scientific theory and Christian Scientists enforce it with rubber truncheons.
uncyclopedia.org /wiki/Disease   (329 words)

  
 Crohn's Disease   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease, the general name for diseases that cause swelling in the intestines.
Blockage occurs because the disease tends to thicken the intestinal wall with swelling and scar tissue, narrowing the passage.
Surgery does not eliminate the disease, and it is not uncommon for people with Crohn’s Disease to have more than one operation, as inflammation tends to return to the area next to where the diseased intestine was removed.
digestive.niddk.nih.gov /ddiseases/pubs/crohns   (2640 words)

  
 NGDF: Frequently Asked Questions About Graves Disease
Graves' disease occurs in less that 1/4 of 1% of the population.
There are many studies of other auto-immune diseases that indicate that the more input and control a patient has in their care, the more rapid their recovery will be.
Graves disease usually responds to treatment, and after the initial period of hyperthyroidism, is relatively easy to treat and manage.
www.ngdf.org /faq.htm   (764 words)

  
 MENIERES DISEASE
Ménière's disease is a disorder of the inner ear which causes episodes of vertigo, ringing in the ears (tinnitus), a feeling of fullness or pressure in the ear, and fluctuating hearing loss.
Because Meniere's disease occurs in roughly 0.2/100 persons, and Hydrops is found in 6/100 temporal bones, there is more than an order of magnitude more people with hydrops than Meniere's disease.
For bilateral Meniere's disease, when the patient is incapacitated and it cannot be determined which ear is causing the dizziness, intramuscular streptomycin (1 gm twice/day) can be given on an outpatient basis until the first sign of ototoxicity develops (generally about a month).
www.dizziness-and-balance.com /disorders/menieres/menieres.html   (4783 words)

  
 Thyroid Disease   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Graves disease, an autoimmune disease, is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism.
For reasons that doctors don't yet understand, autoimmune thyroid diseases like Graves disease are much more common in women and are most likely to occur in teens and young and middle-aged adults.
Doctors usually diagnose Graves disease based on a person's symptoms, a physical examination, and blood tests that show high levels of thyroid hormone in the blood.
kidshealth.org /teen/diseases_conditions/growth/thyroid_p2.html   (623 words)

  
 Huntington's Disease Information Page: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
HD is a familial disease, passed from parent to child through a mutation in the normal gene.
If a child does not inherit the HD gene, he or she will not develop the disease and cannot pass it to subsequent generations.
As the disease progresses, concentration on intellectual tasks becomes increasingly difficult and the patient may have difficulty feeding himself or herself and swallowing.
www.ninds.nih.gov /disorders/huntington/huntington.htm   (649 words)

  
 Parkinson's Disease - Health and Medical Information produced by doctors - MedicineNet.com
Parkinson's disease may be one of the most baffling and complex of the neurological disorders.
Parkinson's disease was first described in 1817 by James Parkinson, a British physician who published a paper on what he called "the shaking palsy." In this paper, he set forth the major symptoms of the disease that would later bear his name.
Parkinson's disease is also called primary parkinsonism or idiopathic Parkinson's disease; idiopathic is a term describing a disorder for which no cause has yet been found.
www.medicinenet.com /parkinsons_disease/article.htm   (641 words)

  
 Thyroid Disease
Graves disease, an autoimmune disease, is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism.
For reasons that doctors don't yet understand, autoimmune thyroid diseases like Graves disease are much more common in women and are most likely to occur in teens and young and middle-aged adults.
A nodule may simply be an overgrowth of normal thyroid tissue, a swelling caused by inflammation (such as in autoimmune thyroid diseases) or a collection of fluid called a cyst.
www.kidshealth.org /teen/diseases_conditions/growth/thyroid.html   (1941 words)

  
 Huntington Disease
A single abnormal gene passed on by one parent to a child causes Huntington disease, an illness in which the brain's nerve-cell function is disrupted.
Consequently, part of the devastation of the disease is that by the time a person is diagnosed, most victims have started families.
They also have seen that the pattern of genetic changes that occurs in Huntington disease is similar to that found in other diseases that cause the nervous system to degenerate, and that degeneration occurs more rapidly with age.
www.fhcrc.org /research/diseases/huntingtons   (811 words)

  
 Gum Disease Information from the American Academy of Periodontology
Diabetes is a disease that causes altered levels of sugar in the blood.
Diseases that interfere with the body's immune system may worsen the condition of the gums.
A form of periodontal disease resulting in inflammation within the supporting tissues of the teeth, progressive attachment and bone loss and is characterized by pocket formation and/or recession of the gingiva.
www.perio.org /consumer/2a.html   (1390 words)

  
 Crohn’s Disease: Topic Overview - WebMD
Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes inflammation or ulceration of the digestive tract
Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (which affects the colon and rectum) are the most common types of inflammatory bowel disease, with ulcerative colitis being more common.
Crohn's disease can usually be controlled with medications that reduce inflammation and cure infection, keeping the disease from producing symptoms (known as being in remission).
www.webmd.com /ibd-crohns-disease/crohns-guide/Crohns-Disease-Topic-Overview   (851 words)

  
 National Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease
Chronic kidney disease includes conditions that damage your kidneys and decrease their ability to keep you healthy by doing the jobs listed.
When kidney disease progresses, it may eventually lead to kidney failure, which requires dialysis or a kidney transplant to maintain life.
Heart disease is the major cause of death for all people with CKD.
www.kidney.org /kidneyDisease/index.cfm   (352 words)

  
 About Alzheimer's | Statistics about Alzheimer's Disease
Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of aging.
A person with Alzheimer’s disease will live an average of eight years and as many as 20 years or more from the onset of symptoms as estimated by relatives.
National direct and indirect annual costs of caring for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease are at least $100 billion, according to estimates used by the Alzheimer’s Association and the National Institute on Aging.
www.alz.org /AboutAD/Statistics.asp   (909 words)

  
 Celiac Disease   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Celiac disease is a digestive disease that damages the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food.
However, since celiac disease is hereditary, family members, particularly first-degree relatives-meaning parents, siblings, or children of people who have been diagnosed-may wish to be tested for the disease.
People with celiac disease have to be extremely careful about what they buy for lunch at school or work, what they purchase at the grocery store, what they eat at restaurants or parties, or what they grab for a snack.
digestive.niddk.nih.gov /ddiseases/pubs/celiac   (3252 words)

  
 Women, Heart Disease and Stroke
In fact, coronary heart disease, which causes heart attack, is the leading cause of death for American women.
Overall, they found that heart disease is almost twice as likely to develop in inactive people than in those who are more active.
Excessive alcohol intake — The risk of heart disease in people who drink moderate amounts of alcohol (an average of one drink for women per day) is lower than in nondrinkers.
www.americanheart.org /presenter.jhtml?identifier=4786   (1027 words)

  
 Genes and disease
However, one of the most difficult problems ahead is to find out how genes contribute to diseases that have a complex pattern of inheritance, such as in the cases of diabetes, asthma, cancer and mental illness.
It is likely that more than one mutation is required before the disease is manifest, and a number of genes may each make a subtle contribution to a person's susceptibility to a disease; genes may also affect how a person reacts to environmental factors.
Unraveling these networks of events will undoubtedly be a challenge for some time to come, and will be amply assisted by the availability of the draft (and complete) sequence of the human genome.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov /disease   (390 words)

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