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Topic: Dispersion (optics)


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  The Effects of Dispersion on High-speed Fiber Optic Data Transmission: Fiber Bandwidth isn't Infinite
Dispersion was initially a problem when the first optical fibers, multimode step-index fiber, were introduced.
Chromatic dispersion is the result of material dispersion, waveguide dispersion, or profile dispersion.
The laser is 0.1 nm wide with a center wavelength of 1550 nm and a fiber dispersion of 17 ps/nm/km.
www.fiber-optics.info /articles/dispersion.htm   (2355 words)

  
  Dispersion (optics)
In optics, dispersion is a phenomenon that causes the separation of a wave into spectral components with different wavelengths, due to a dependence of the wave's speed on its wavelength.
The overall dispersion of the optical resonator is a major factor in determining the duration of the pulses emitted by the laser.
In the technical terminology of gemology, dispersion is the difference in the refractive index of a material at the B and G Fraunhofer wavelengths of 686.7 nm and 430.8 nm and is meant to express the degree to which a prism cut from the gemstone shows "fire", or color.
www.photonicsknowledge.com /optics/Dispersion_(optics)   (1468 words)

  
 Swamp Optics--Dispersion Tutorial
This is because material properties, in particular, the dispersion (the variation of refractive index with wavelength), which plays a key role in GRENOUILLE’s operation, itself varies with wavelength.
Dispersion in the form of group-velocity mismatch (between the input pulse and its second harmonic) allows GRENOUILLE’s second-harmonicgeneration (SHG) crystal to spectrally resolve the pulse, but group-velocity dispersion in the same crystal also could distort the pulse to be measured if it is very short.
Thus, the greater the dispersion, the longer the pulse that GRENOUILLE prefers to measure.
www.swampoptics.com /tutorials_dispersion.htm   (794 words)

  
 Definition of Dispersion (optics)
In optics, dispersion is a phenomenon that causes the separation of a wave into spectral components with different frequencies, due to a dependence of the wave's speed on its frequency.
There are generally two sources of dispersion: material dispersion, which comes from a frequency-dependent response of a material to waves; and waveguide dispersion, which comes because the transverse mode solutions for waves confined laterally within a finite waveguide generally depend upon the frequency (i.e.
Instead, the solution that is currently used in practice is to perform dispersion compensation, typically by matching the fiber with another fiber of opposite-sign dispersion so that the dispersion effects cancel; such compensation is ultimately limited by nonlinear effects such as self phase modulation, which interact with dispersion to make it very difficult to undo.
www.wordiq.com /definition/Dispersion_(optics)   (1209 words)

  
  Laser Focus World - Optics News and Information- Laser Focus World
Optics, or the manipulation of light by mirrors, lenses, prisms, diffraction gratings, and/or other optical elements, is a discipline that has been around for thousands of years.
Because the use of fiber optics or optical fiber for communications requires that the data be sent using a laser, fiber optic communications are also commonly referred to as fiber optic laser communications or simply laser communications (although laser communications can also occur in free space without the use of optical fiber).
In addition to communications purposes, fiber optics can also be used to deliver light for the purpose of industrial and fiber optic lighting in homes, automobiles, or in other fiber optic illumination applications such as the use of large-core optical fibers for light delivery in medical and microscopy applications.
lfw.pennnet.com /resource/optics   (694 words)

  
 Dispersion - LoveToKnow 1911
Apart from the technical use of the term, especially in optics (see below), the expression particularly applied to the settlements of Jews in foreign countries outside Palestine.
andaoroper) is also used of these scattered communities, but s usually confined to the dispersion among the Hellenic and Roman peoples, or to the body of Christian Jews outside Palestine (see JEws).
This page was last modified 01:53, 3 Sep 2006.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Dispersion   (102 words)

  
 Definition: dispersion   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Note 1: In communication technology, "dispersion" is used to describe any process by which an electromagnetic signal propagating in a physical medium is degraded because the various wave components (i.e., frequencies) of the signal have different propagation velocities within the physical medium.
Note 3: In optical fiber communications, the incorrect terms "multimode dispersion" and "intermodal dispersion" should not be used as synonyms for the correct term "multimode distortion." Note 4: In classical optics, "dispersion" is used to denote the wavelength dependence of refractive index in matter, (dn/d
material dispersion: In optical fiber communication, the wavelength dependence of the velocity of propagation (of the optical signal) on the bulk material of which the fiber is made.
www.its.bldrdoc.gov /fs-1037/dir-012/_1740.htm   (379 words)

  
 Definition: dispersion   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
dispersion: Any phenomenon in which the velocity of propagation of an electromagnetic wave is wavelength dependent.
Note 1: In communication technology, "dispersion" is used to describe any process by which an electromagnetic signal propagating in a physical medium is degraded because the various wave components (i.e., frequencies) of the signal have different propagation velocities within the physical medium.
material dispersion: In optical fiber communication, the wavelength dependence of the velocity of propagation (of the optical signal) on the bulk material of which the fiber is made.
www.atis.org /tg2k/_dispersion.html   (407 words)

  
 Sunrise Luciol - Glossary
The first component of the dispersion is Polarisation Mode Dispersion, caused by the fact that, even in a so-called singlemode fiber, there are in fact two propagation modes allowed, with two orthogonal polarisations.
The second component of the dispersion is chromatic dispersion, caused by the fact that a light pulse is not monochromatic, i.e.
The chromatic dispersion coefficient, D, is the parameter, which is usually used to characterize the chromatic dispersion of the fibre.
www.luciol.com /glossary.html   (558 words)

  
 Laser pulse travels 300 times faster than light - optics.org
This unusual phenomenon is the result of "anomalous dispersion", an effect not seen in nature in transparent materials and is created by the non-natural thermal state of the cesium gas used in the chamber.
Anomalous dispersion causes components with a shorter wavelength in a vacuum to have a longer wavelength in the chamber and conversely, components with a longer wavelength in a vacuum have a shorter wavelength in the chamber.
Unlike with normal dispersion, anomalous dispersion has the extraordinary effect of enabling a light pulse to appear again at a distant point along its direction of propagation and produce the exact shape of the light pulse that entered the chamber.
optics.org /articles/news/6/7/19/1   (466 words)

  
 Understanding and measuring chromatic dispersion
Chromatic dispersion is the combined result of material dispersion and waveguide dispersion, which tend to have opposite effects.
Dispersion is found by differentiating the delay equation with respect to wavelength.
While the single-ended access and compact size make the OTDR chromatic dispersion measurement ideal for field testing, the speed and simplicity of the measurement is of interest to fiber and cable manufacturers that need to provide chromatic dispersion data to their customers.
www.fiberopticsonline.com /content/news/article.asp?DocID={AD24094E-6231-11D4-8C55-009027DE0829}&VNETCOOKIE=NO   (1704 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In optics, dispersion is a phenomenon that causes the separation of a wave into spectral components with different frequencies, due to a dependence of the wave's speed on its frequency.
In materials science, dispersion is the fraction of atoms of a material exposed to the surface.
In general: where D is the dispersion, NS is the number of surface atoms and NT is the total number of atoms of the material.
www.fearofphysics.com /w.php?define=Dispersion   (117 words)

  
 Encyclopedia of Laser Physics and Technology - dispersion, chromatic dispersion, group velocity, anomalous, normal, ...
The chromatic dispersion of an optical medium is basically the frequency dependence of the phase velocity with which light propagates in the medium.
Anomalous dispersion of short pieces of fiber can also be measured using soliton effects: a spectral modulation arises from picosecond pulses the parameters of which do not fully match those of a soliton, and from this modulation one can derive the dispersion.
Dispersion in the cavity of a wavelength-tunable passively mode-locked laser can be measured by monitoring changes in the pulse repetition frequency when the laser wavelength is changed, as this reveals the wavelength-dependent group delay.
www.rp-photonics.com /dispersion.html   (1679 words)

  
 Glossary
Diffractive Optics, a revolutionary new lens optical technology that permits super-telephoto lenses that are significantly shorter and lighter than previously possible, while simultaneously improving optical performance by reducing chromatic aberrations and even spherical aberrations.
When light enters a lens or prism, the dispersion characteristics of the lens or prism cause the index of refraction to vary depending on the wavelength thus dispersing the light.
However, partial dispersion characteristics differ for some glass materials, such as glass that exhibits larger partial dispersion at short wavelengths, FK glass which features a small index of refraction and low dispersion characteristics, fluorite, and glass that exhibits larger partial dispersion at long wavelengths.
www.usa.canon.com /html/eflenses/lens101/glossary/index_d.html   (2208 words)

  
 Optics of Prisms
But because dispersion is really a very small effect, it isn't the main optical action of a prism; more correctly, it should be looked at a a minor side effect.
In optics, prisms made for the purpose of dispersing light are usually made with bases that are equilateral triangles, so that the angles between adjacent sides of the prism are 60°.
The figure was constructed using the actual dispersion curve of BK 7 crown glass, similar in its optical properties to ordinary window glass.
mintaka.sdsu.edu /GF/explain/optics/prisms.html   (811 words)

  
 GIA: Research: Article Detail
Most of these causes are found in the interdependent relationship between the optical properties of diamond as a material, the effects of a polished diamond's cut (e.g., facet angles, the quality of a diamond's polish, etc.), and the illumination and environment (or "panorama") in which the diamond is viewed.
RI is measured for materials at the Fraunhofer [Footnote 3] D-line (due to light emission from sodium) in the yellow region of the visible spectrum at 589.3 nm.
Seen from the inside of the diamond, this means that for a wider spread of light rays, the light should strike the inner surface as close to the critical angle as possible (while still remaining inside of that angle so that the rays are not reflected back into the diamond).
www.gia.edu /research/1383/2307/article_detail.cfm   (2837 words)

  
 Lightwave - Three approaches to solving dispersion compensation at 10G
As multiple amplifiers are cascaded to achieve a longer transmission distance, other optical impairments occur, including chromatic dispersion and polarization mode dispersion (PMD), which result in a spreading or broadening of the signal due to the propagation of different wavelengths at different speeds.
Dispersion causes a spreading or broadening of an optical signal due to the propagation of different wavelengths at different speeds.
In long-haul networks, over- or undercompensating the dispersion is not a concern, since the distance is fixed and the amount of dispersion required is known.
lw.pennnet.com /articles/article_display.cfm?Section=ARTCL&C=Techn&ARTICLE_ID=242495&KEYWORDS=OpVista&p=13   (1737 words)

  
 National Technological University -- Optical Sciences
Optical sciences, often simply referred to as optics, is a broad, multidisciplinary field involving the design and fabrication of instruments and devices to generate, control, and detect light, as well as the physics of optical sources, optical detectors, optical propagation, and the interactions of light with matter.
Optics is a pervasive enabling technology whose importance in areas such as communications, medicine, manufacturing, and consumer products is rapidly increasing.
To support this growth, a large number of trained professionals in optics will be needed, but there are only three institutions of higher education in the United States that have comprehensive optics programs leading to graduate degrees in optical sciences.
iiswinprd03.petersons.com /ntu/msos.asp   (1020 words)

  
 White Papers
Fiber optic technology is simply the use of light to transmit data.
The optic core is the light-carrying element at the center.
Dispersion can also occur when the optical signal gets out of the core and into the cladding, causing shrinking of the total pulse.
www.transition.com /TransitionNetworks/Learning/Whitepaper/Fiber.aspx   (2209 words)

  
 ATM MM SM Taps | Fiber Optic Cable Singlemode & Multimode   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The first is modal dispersion, which is caused by different path lengths followed by light rays as they bounce down the fiber.
The second type of dispersion is material dispersion: different wavelengths of light travel at different speeds.
By varying the optical properties of the core, the graded-index multimode fiber reduces dispersion and increases bandwidth.
www.netoptics.com /products/fiber_cables.asp?Section=products&menuitem=5   (2459 words)

  
 Optics
Accurate compression has to be employed in order to compensate for the dispersion of the optical path between the laser and the experimental target.
Dispersive mirrors show dispersion of the opposite sign compared to e.g.
To be able to use the laser beam from an oscillator at different locations at the same time, a variety of beam splitters with different splitting ratios are offered.
www.femtolasers.com /Pages/Optics.html   (270 words)

  
 Dispersion Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Biological dispersal, the distribution of spores, fruits and their seeds, etc.
Dispersion (materials science), a stable or unstable system of fine particles, evenly distributed in a medium
Dispersive mass transfer, in fluid dynamics, the spreading of mass from areas of high to low concentration
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Dispersion   (79 words)

  
 Dispersion of Light - Succeed in Physical Science: School for Champions
Dispersion can cause problems with camera lenses and must be minimized.
The solution to that problem is to combine a positive lens that has one index of refraction with a negative lens of a different type of glass and a different index of refraction, such that the dispersion of the two negate each other.
Optics by Eugene Hecht; Addison Wesley (2001) $108.00 - Textbook covers wave motion, electromagnetic theory, propagation of light, geometrical optics, superimposition of waves, polarization, interference, diffraction, fourier optics and lasers
www.school-for-champions.com /science/light_dispersion.htm   (1076 words)

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