Districts of the Achaemenid Empire - Factbites
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Topic: Districts of the Achaemenid Empire


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In the News (Wed 26 Jun 19)

  
 An Introduction to the History of the Assyrian Church
The empire was inhabited by a tolerably homogeneous nation, as far as its central provinces went; though a fringe of sub-kings (Armenian, Arab, Turk) ruled districts round its borders.
Its ambition, however, was not to form a new empire, but to revive an old one; and it claimed to be the lawful heir, not of the Arsacid kingdom of modern Mesopotamia and Persia, but of the Achaemenid Empire of Xerxes and Darius, stretching from the Hindu-Kush to the Mediterranean.
In the Roman Empire it was the name of a civil and financial office; but previously to its use as an ecclesiastical title in Persia it had been adopted by the Armenians as the title of the principal bishop of their national Church.
www.aina.org /books/itthotac/itthotac.htm   (17313 words)

  
 The Achaemenids
An overview of articles on the Achaemenid empire can be found here; a list of kings is here.
According to the official story, the Achaemenid or Persian empire was founded by Cyrus the Great, who became king of Persis in 559 BCE and defeated his overlord
Darius reorganized the empire and created satrapies, territorial units that also served as tax districts.
www.livius.org /aa-ac/achaemenians/achaemenians.html   (773 words)

  
 The Achaemenids
According to the official story, the Achaemenid or Persian empire was founded by Cyrus the Great, who became king of Persis in 559 BCE and defeated his overlord
After the death of Artaxerxes III, there was a crisis in the Achaemenid dynasty.
It should be stressed that there is not a single piece of contemporary evidence that calls Cyrus or Cambyses Achaemenids.
www.livius.org /aa-ac/achaemenians/achaemenians.html   (778 words)

  
 Cappuccino Persian Online Magazine Passing Relief
Unfortunately, in 338 BCE Artaxerxes III was poisoned by his eunuch Bagoas, who by murdering one of the most able Achaemenid emperors, unknowingly facilitated the fall of the Persian Empire.
After that, he had become the governor of several districts in Cappadocia, and following some court conspiracy against him, managed to enlarge his territory and become almost independent.
He was reinstated in his position as ruler of Halicarnassus and after his death in 353 BCE, his “Mausoleum” which was modelled after the tomb of Cyrus in Pasargadae, became one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.
www.cappuccinomag.com /iranologyenglish/001555.shtml   (778 words)

  
 Cappuccino Iranian Weekly Magazine: Passing Relief
Unfortunately, in 338 BCE Artaxerxes III was poisoned by his eunuch Bagoas, who by murdering one of the most able Achaemenid emperors, unknowingly facilitated the fall of the Persian Empire.
After that, he had become the governor of several districts in Cappadocia, and following some court conspiracy against him, managed to enlarge his territory and become almost independent.
He was reinstated in his position as ruler of Halicarnassus and after his death in 353 BCE, his “Mausoleum” which was modelled after the tomb of Cyrus in Pasargadae, became one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.
www.cappuccinomag.com /iranologyenglish/print/001555.html   (778 words)

  
 Cappuccino Persian Online Magazine Passing Relief
Unfortunately, in 338 BCE Artaxerxes III was poisoned by his eunuch Bagoas, who by murdering one of the most able Achaemenid emperors, unknowingly facilitated the fall of the Persian Empire.
After that, he had become the governor of several districts in Cappadocia, and following some court conspiracy against him, managed to enlarge his territory and become almost independent.
He was reinstated in his position as ruler of Halicarnassus and after his death in 353 BCE, his “Mausoleum” which was modelled after the tomb of Cyrus in Pasargadae, became one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.
www.cappuccinomag.com /iranologyenglish/001555.shtml   (778 words)

  
 THE IRANIAN: Pallava empire of Dravidia, Samar Abbas
Pallava administration was based on the Maurya pattern, which was in turn based on that of the Achaemenid Empire.
The Pallavas are believed to be identical with the Kurumbas, of whom the Kurumbar of the Tamil country and the Kurubas of the Kanarese districts and of the Mysore State may be taken as the living representatives.
Kirtivarman II, son of Vikramaditya II, also claims to have led an expedition in his youth against the Pallavas.
www.iranian.com /History/2003/May/Pallava   (6382 words)

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