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Topic: Djibouti


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 Djibouti - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Djibouti is a semi-presidential republic, with executive power in the government, and legislative power in both the government and parliament.
Djibouti's second president, Guelleh was first elected to office in 1999, taking over from his uncle, Hassan Gouled Aptidon, who had ruled the country since its independence from France in 1977.
The Somali ethnic component in Djibouti is mainly composed of the Issas, who form the majority and rule the nation, and the Gadabuursi and Isaaq, all of whom are closely related as Dir subclans.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Djibouti   (1069 words)

  
 Economy of Djibouti - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Djibouti's fledgling economy depends on a large foreign expatriate community, the maritime and commercial activities of the Port of Djibouti, its airport, and the operation of the Addis Ababa-Djibouti railroad.
Djibouti became the only significant port for landlocked Ethiopia, handling all its imports and exports, including huge shipments of U.S. food aid in 2000 during the drought and famine.
Djibouti's unfavorable balance of trade is offset partially by invisible earnings such as transit taxes and harbor dues.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Economy_of_Djibouti   (716 words)

  
 Djibouti (03/06)
Djibouti is a republic whose electorate approved the current constitution in September 1992.
Djibouti's most important economic asset is its strategic location on the shipping routes between the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean--the republic lies on the west side of the Bab-el-Mandeb, which connects the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden.
Djibouti is a member of the Arab League, as well as the African Union, the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA).
www.state.gov /r/pa/ei/bgn/5482.htm   (3373 words)

  
 Background Notes Archive - Africa   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
ECONOMY Djibouti's fledgling economy depends on a large foreign expatriate community, the maritime and commercial activities of the Port of Djibouti, its airport, and the operation of the Addis Ababa-Djibouti railroad.
Djibouti's most important economic asset is its strategic location on the shipping routes between the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean -- the republic lies on the west side of the Bab-el-Mandeb, which connects the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden.
Because Djibouti is greatly affected by events that occur in Somalia and Ethiopia, and vice versa, relations are delicate.
dosfan.lib.uic.edu /ERC/bgnotes/af/djibouti9603.html   (2438 words)

  
 Djibouti
Djibouti is host to several thousand French military personnel, including the 13e Démi-Brigade de la Légion Étrangère (13e DBLE - 13th Half-Brigade of the Foreign Legion).
Djibouti's population of approximately 600,000 is predominantly Muslim and mainly of Somali or Afar origin.
Djibouti has a coastline of 314 km and the Red Sea is known to be very rich in fish.
www.globalsecurity.org /military/facility/djibouti.htm   (710 words)

  
 NationMaster - Statistics on Djibouti. 719 facts and figures, stats and information on Djiboutian economy, crime, ...
The French Territory of the Afars and the Issas became Djibouti in 1977.
Djibouti occupies a very strategic geographic location at the mouth of the Red Sea and serves as an important transshipment location for goods entering and leaving the east African highlands.
Djibouti currently hosts the only United States military base in sub-Saharan Africa and is a front-line state in the global war on terrorism.
www.nationmaster.com /country/dj   (284 words)

  
 Djibouti travel guide - Wikitravel
Djibouti is in East Africa, bordered by Eritrea to the north, Ethiopia to the west and south, and Somalia to the southeast.
Djibouti occupies a strategic geographic location at the mouth of the Red Sea and serves as an important transshipment location for goods entering and leaving the east African highlands.
Djibouti hosts the only US military base in sub-Saharan Africa and is a front-line state in the global war on terrorism.
wikitravel.org /en/Djibouti   (299 words)

  
 Djibouti
Djibouti maintains economic ties and border accords with "Somaliland" leadership while maintaining some political ties to various factions in Somalia; although most of the 26,000 Somali refugees in Djibouti who fled civil unrest in the early 1990s have returned, several thousand still await repatriation in UNHCR camps.
Djibouti lies in northeast Africa on the Gulf of Aden at the southern entrance to the Red Sea.
Djibouti, country, Africa: Economy - Economy Djibouti's economy is based on a number of service activities associated with its strategic...
www.factmonster.com /ipka/A0107467.html   (602 words)

  
 Operation Enduring Freedom - Horn of Africa / Djibouti
A small desert country located at the south entrance of the Red Sea on the Horn of Africa, Djibouti is split by a central mountain range which runs between a coastal plain and an inland plateau.
Djibouti's climate is hot and arid with negligible rainfall.
Djibouti's importance stems from its strategic location at the entrance to the Bab al Mandeb.
www.globalsecurity.org /military/ops/oef-djibouti.htm   (632 words)

  
 Worldworx Travel - Regional Information - Africa - East Africa - Djibouti
Djibouti is located in Eastern Africa on the coast of the Aden Gulf and the Red Sea.
Djibouti has a coastline of 314 km and is a great destination for Red Sea Diving as reef life is in exceptional abundance.
In some ways Djibouti is fortunate in the respect that it is located near some of the world's busiest shipping lanes and is close to Arabian oilfields.
www.worldworx.tv /regional-information/africa/east-africa/djibouti   (534 words)

  
 djibouti map and information page
The tiny country of Djibouti is strategically situated between the western edge of the Gulf of Aden, and the entrance to the Red Sea.
As a significant regional port, Djibouti's modern economy revolves (almost totally) around the shipping and refueling industries, as the country has limited natural resources and is (through little fault of its own) economically underdeveloped.
Central and south Djibouti is covered by a stony desert, as well as scattered volcanic plateaus crisscrossed by deep, time-worn troughs, some with shallow salt water lakes.
www.worldatlas.com /webimage/countrys/africa/dj.htm   (486 words)

  
 Djibouti: Location, Map, Area, Capital, Population, Religion, Language - Country Information
Location: Djibouti is part of the African continent bounded to the northeast and east by the Red Sea, the southeast by Somalia and the south, west and north by Ethiopia.
The country is a barren strip of land around the Gulf of Tadjoura, varying in width from 20km to 90 km, with a coastline of 800 km, much of it white sandy beaches.
Membership: Djibouti is a member of the UN, OAU, the Arab League, Organization of the Islamic Conference and is an ACP state of the EU.
www.arab.de /arabinfo/djibouti.htm   (194 words)

  
 Djibouti
Djibouti is a republic with a strong presidency and a weak but evolving legislature.
On April 3, police forces used tear gas and clubs to disperse 60 students of the Balbara district of Djibouti City who were protesting their exclusion from graduate exams.
The ILO Committee of Experts again cited section 6 of the Djibouti labor code, which limits trade union representatives to citizens, consequently restricting the full exercise of the right of workers to elect representatives in full freedom.
www.state.gov /g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2002/18180.htm   (6227 words)

  
 Worldworx Travel - Safety - Africa - Djibouti
Djibouti is a developing African country located on the shore of the Red Sea.
Djibouti enjoys a stable political climate, thanks in part to the large French military presence based in country.
Roads in Djibouti City and elsewhere in the country are narrow, poorly maintained, and poorly lit.
www.worldworx.tv /safety/africa/djibouti   (1055 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
It is bound by Eritrea to the northwest, Ethiopia to the west and south, Somalia to the southeast and the Gulf of Aden to the northeast and east.
Average annual precipitation for Djibouti City is 130 mm (5 inches) and average temperature ranges are from 23 to 29 degrees Celsius (73 to 84 degrees Fahrenheit) in January to 31 to 41 degrees Celsius (88 to 106 degrees Fahrenheit) in July.
In 1990 the unsettled state of affairs in neighboring Somali caused tensions in Djibouti and during most of the year there were border disputes with Somali troops re-taking a border area it had lost in 1989.
www.atlapedia.com /online/countries/djibouti.htm   (1096 words)

  
 Djibouti
In particular, Somalia, Djibouti's neighbor to the south, is considered by many to be a haven for terrorists and other insurgent elements.
Malaria and dengue fever are prevalent in Djibouti.
In 2005, polio was found in all of Djibouti’s neighbors (Somalia, Ethiopia, Eritrea and Yemen) and health professionals strongly suspect it is present in Djibouti.
travel.state.gov /travel/djibouti.html   (2341 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | World | Africa | Country profiles | Country profile: Djibouti
Djibouti's location is the main economic asset of a country that is mostly barren.
After independence from France in 1977, Djibouti was left with a government which enjoyed a balance between the two main ethnic groups, the Issa of Somali origin and the Afar of Ethiopian origin.
Mr Guelleh, known in Djibouti by his initials, IOG, won a second term in one-man presidential elections in April 2005.
news.bbc.co.uk /1/hi/world/africa/country_profiles/1070579.stm   (565 words)

  
 Passport Express
In particular, Somalia, Djibouti's neighbor to the south, is believed to be a haven for terrorists and other insurgent elements.
Djibouti is a developing east African country on the shore of the Red Sea that achieved independence from France in 1977.
The two main international routes to Djibouti City via Dire Dawa, Ethiopia, and Yoboki, Djibouti, are in poor condition due to the passage of 1000 heavily-laden trucks per day.
www.passportexpress.com /default.aspx?page=show_visa&action=Djibouti   (1208 words)

  
 An MBendi Profile: An MBendi Country Profile for Djibouti including economic and travel overviews and directories of ...
Djibouti is a small independent republic with a democratic government which lies in the Horn of Africa at the southern entrance to the Red Sea and forms part of the North East African Region.
The country consists of the port capital Djibouti where two thirds of the population live, and a surrounding enclave of hinterland.
The management of the country’s main airport, the Djibouti International Airport has been granted to a private company and is an indication of the privatisation process underway in the country.
www.mbendi.co.za /cydjcy.htm   (561 words)

  
 Disaster Par Extraordinaire?, by Christopher Deliso
In Djibouti, all the president's men, and the businessman providing "human resources" for Brown and Root, have murky enough backgrounds to make us wonder whether the US Government really understands what it is getting itself into.
A case in point was Djibouti's abrupt closure of their border and massing of troops (on 12 April 2001).
The American move to Djibouti can therefore be interpreted as an attempt to undercut, and perhaps eliminate French political and military influence – a tactic that has been used in other theaters, notably in Georgia, where last spring the US sent military trainers.
www.antiwar.com /orig/deliso68.html   (5819 words)

  
 Djibouti
Djibouti City is the capital of the Republic of Djibouti.
The economy of the city and country depends on the city's role as a storage, refueling and supply station, notably between Ethiopia and the Red Sea trade.
As a result, guerrilla warfare on parts of the Djibouti-Addis Ababa railway at the time of the Ethiopian civil war in the late 1970's upset Djibouti's economy, which was already weakened by the closing of the Suez Canal (1967-75).
us-africa.tripod.com /djibouti.html   (550 words)

  
 Travel Advice for Djibouti - Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Roads in Djibouti are often narrow, poorly lit and badly maintained.
When you are in Djibouti, be aware that local laws and penalties, including ones that appear harsh by Australian standards, do apply to you.
If you are travelling to Djibouti, whatever the reason and however long you'll be there, we encourage you to register with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.
www.smartraveller.gov.au /zw-cgi/view/Advice/Djibouti   (1250 words)

  
 Overview - Djibouti Country Guide - World Travel Guide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Djibouti was originally inhabited by nomadic tribes, the main ones being the Afars and the Issas, who are strongly linked to Ethiopia and Somalia respectively.
In 1945, French Somaliland (as the area was called) was declared an ‘overseas territory’ and in 1967, it became the French territory of the ‘Afars and Issas’.
During the Gulf War it was the base of operations for the French military, who continue to maintain a significant presence, contributing directly and indirectly to more than half the country's income.
www.travel-guide.com /country/country_guide.ehtml?o=75&NAV_guide_class=CountryGuide&NAV_Region=75   (179 words)

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