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Topic: Docetism


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  The Ecole Initiative: Docetism
"Docetism" is the name given a variety of christological tendencies whose unifying characteristics are subject to considerable scholarly debate.
Kaesemann's assessment of John's theology is subject to question--certainly many passages stress Jesus' actual carnality--but whether John is sponsoring incipient docetism or trying to oppose it, the Johannine literature (which is usually estimated to have come from the end of the first century) manifestly wrestles with the problem of incarnational theology.
Norbert Brox--concerned to differentiate ancient docetism from modern christological problems--suggests that the term "docetism" be reserved for cases where a doctrine deliberately distinguishes Jesus' manifestation from his essence: "Docetism lies at hand where a christology claims: Jesus was different from what he seemed to be" (Brox 309).
www2.evansville.edu /ecoleweb/articles/docetism.html   (1483 words)

  
 Docetism
Docetism is closely linked to the Gnostic ideas of the Middle East in its time, among them Valentianism.
Docetism is among the earliest Christian sectarian doctrines.
Docetism was rejected by the early Christian councils and mainstream Christianity, but it only slowly died out during the 1st millennium CE.
lexicorient.com /e.o/docetism.htm   (297 words)

  
  Docetism
Docetism was an error with several variations concerning the nature of Christ.
The basic principle of Docetism was refuted by the Apostle John in 1 John 4:2-3.
Docetism was condemned at the Council of Chalcedon in 451.
www.carm.org /heresy/docetism.htm   (212 words)

  
  Docetism
Docetic teachings were also advanced by the 2d - century proponents of Gnosticism and were combatted by the 2d - century church fathers, especially by Ignatius of Antioch and Irenaeus.
Docetism is a term used to refer to a theological perspective among some in the early church who regarded the sufferings and the human aspects of Christ as imaginary or apparent instead of being part of a real incarnation.
Docetic thinking became an integral part of the perspectives of Gnostics, who viewed Jesus as the alien messenger from outside the present evil world and one who was untouched by the evil creator.
mb-soft.com /believe/txc/docetism.htm   (409 words)

  
 Docetism - Information from Reference.com
In Christianity, Docetism (from the Greek δοκέω [dokeō], "to seem") is the belief that Jesus' physical body was an illusion, as was his crucifixion; that is, Jesus only seemed to have a physical body and to physically die, but in reality he was incorporeal, a pure spirit, and hence could not physically die.
Docetism could be further explained as the view that, because the human body is temporary and the spirit is eternal, the body of Jesus therefore must have been an illusion and his crucifixion as well.
Docetism was rejected by the ecumenical councils and mainstream Christianity, and largely died out during the first millennium A.D. Catharism, and other surviving gnostic movements, incorporated docetism into their beliefs, but the movement was destroyed by the Albigensian Crusade (1209-1229).
www.reference.com /search?q=Docetism   (462 words)

  
 Docetism
Docetic teachings were also advanced by the 2d - century proponents of Gnosticism and were combatted by the 2d - century church fathers, especially by Ignatius of Antioch and Irenaeus.
Docetism is a term used to refer to a theological perspective among some in the early church who regarded the sufferings and the human aspects of Christ as imaginary or apparent instead of being part of a real incarnation.
Docetic thinking became an integral part of the perspectives of Gnostics, who viewed Jesus as the alien messenger from outside the present evil world and one who was untouched by the evil creator.
www.mb-soft.com /believe/txc/docetism.htm   (409 words)

  
 Docetism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Docetism is derived from the Greek dokeo, “to seem.” It is the erroneous belief that Christ only seemed to be human, that He did not really have a body of human flesh.
He held that Jesus differed from other men only in that He was better and wiser than they, and that the divine Christ descended upon Him at the baptism and left Him at the cross.
Docetism stemmed from the view that flesh and physical matter were evil, or the source of evil.
www.tecmalta.org /tft320.htm   (263 words)

  
 What are Docetism, Apollinarianism, Ebionism, and Eutychianism?
Answer: Docetism, Apollinarianism, Ebionism, and Eutychianism (also known as monophysitism) are all false views of the relationship between Jesus' deity and humanity.
Similarly to Docetism, Apollinarianism is refuted by the many Scriptures which teach that Jesus was truly a human being (John 1:14; 1 John 4:1-3).
Docetism, Apollinarianism, Ebionism, Eutychianism, and Nestorianism are all to be rejected because they are not Biblical views of Jesus' nature.
www.gotquestions.org /Docetism-Apollinarianism-Ebionism-Eutychianism.html   (410 words)

  
 Dictionary of Christian Biography and Literature to the End of the Sixth Century A.D., with an Account of the Principal ...
But in order to make the argument valid, there ought to be proof that the rise of Docetism was probably later than the age of Ignatius, whereas the probability seems to be quite the other way.
In the forms of Docetism thus far described there is no evidence that there was involved any more subtle theory than that the senses of the spectators of our Lord's earthly life were deceived.
The Docetism of Valentinus was exhibited in a more artificial theory, which is fully set forth in our art.
www.ccel.org /ccel/wace/biodict.html?term=Docetism   (1517 words)

  
 Docetism - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In Christianity, Docetism is the belief that Jesus did not have a physical body; rather, that his body was an illusion, as was his crucifixion.
Even so, saying that the human body is temporary has a tendency to undercut the importance of the belief in resurrection of the dead and the goodness of created matter, and is in opposition to this orthodox view.
Docetism was rejected by the ecumenical councils and mainstream Christianity, and largely died out during the first millennium A.D. Catharism, and other surviving gnostic movements, incorporated docetism into their beliefs, but the movement was destroyed by the genocide of the Albigensian Crusade.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Docetism   (217 words)

  
 Docetism
A.K.M. Adam, "Docetism, Kasemann, and Christology," Scottish Journal of Theology 49.4 (1996): 391-410.
Jerry W. McCant, "The Gospel of Peter: Docetism Reconsidered," New Testament Studies 30.2 (1984): 258-273.
Edwin Yamauchi, 'The Crucifixion and Docetic Christology', Concordia Theological Quarterly, 46 (1982): 1-20.
www.earlychurch.org.uk /docetism.php   (74 words)

  
 Docetism Summary
The term docetism is primarily used with reference to ancient Christologies where the reality of Jesus Christ's physical body was denied, or at least various of the normal carnal properties and functions were refused in favor of those more spiritual or ethereal.
Another problem was the reality of his death, and again one can track a variety of strategies that have attempted to circumvent that most human of fates, such as substitution of another on the cross or survival somehow of the experience to awaken in the tomb.
Docetism was rejected by the ecumenical councils and mainstream Christianity, and largely died out during the first millennium A.D. Catharism, and other surviving gnostic movements, incorporated docetism into their beliefs, but the movement was destroyed by the Albigensian Crusade.
www.bookrags.com /Docetism   (1025 words)

  
 Docetism - Glasgledius   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In Christianity, Docetism is the belief that Jesus Christ did not have a physical body: his body was an illusion, as was his crucifixion.
Even so, saying that the human body is temporary has a tendency to undercut the importance of the belief in resurrection of the dead and the goodness of created matter and is in opposition to this orthodox view.
Docetism was rejected by the ecumenical councils and mainstream Christianity, and largely died out during the first millennium A.D. Catharism incorporated docetism into its beliefs, but the Cathars died out, or were, rather, killed off during the 1st papal crusade.
www.glasglow.com /E2/do/Docetism.html   (144 words)

  
 The Docetae
Whatever its source, Docetism was certainly the first of the so-called Christian "heresies." Differences of opinion about the nature of Jesus' body brought the first major dispute and cleavage within the ranks of early Christians, and there seems to have been little or no ground for reconciliation.
For the church-going believer of today, however, Docetism would almost certainly be a new and strange word; and for all those to whom the Bible, even in its present mutilated form, is still the veritable word of God, the testimony of John, that people holding such views are "deceivers," must settle the issue.
The docetic teaching, however conceived or applied -- and it may have been applied by some of the early Christians with undue extravagance -- forces men to think of their true being in terms of an immortal Ego, or Soul, which once inhabited the body.
www.wisdomworld.org /additional/christianity/TheDocetae.html   (2191 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Docetae
Docetism is not properly a Christian heresy at all, as it did not arise in the Church from the misundertanding of a dogma by the faithful, but rather came from without.
Docetism seems to have been closely connected with Judaism (cf.
Docetism are found as far West as Spain among the Priscillianists of the fourth and the fifth century.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/05070c.htm   (1813 words)

  
 Docetism - Information from Reference.com
Docetism, from the Greek 'dokeo' (to seem, to appear) was the contention that
Docetism is derived from the Greek dokeo, “to seem.” It is the erroneous belief
Docetism (or Illusionism) is a Christological heresy, the teaching that Jesus
www.reference.com /search?q=Docetism&db=web   (215 words)

  
 Erroneous Views Concerning The Person of Christ   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Docetism was therefore simply pagan philosophy within the Church.
The Scripture refutation of Docetism is found in John's declaration that "The Word became flesh, and dwelt among us (and we beheld His glory, glory as of the only begotten from the Father), full of grace and truth," 1:14; and also in the unequivocal statement of Heb.
Not until the rise of Socinianism in the sixteenth century do we find an important defection from the Church doctrine; and that was in substance a recrudescence of the ancient Ebionite heresy which denied the Deity of Christ.
www.mbrem.com /jesus_Christ/errors.htm   (2478 words)

  
 Docetism -- Early Christian Heresy
The word ‘Docetism’ is derived from the Greek word “dokeo” which means “to appear or seem”.
Gnosticism produced docetism because it considered it intolerable to think that a pure spiritual being, Christ, could suffer as a man. Hence he must have been human in appearance only.”
Docetism, the first of the heresies involving Christology, provoked a reaction which called forth the earliest Christian creed, that of Ignatius of Antioch.
home.sprynet.com /~eagreen/docetism.html   (704 words)

  
 The Goddess Within
The latter aspect, docetism, assumes that if Christ was truly divine he could not be human, and thus he could not actually suffer and die.
Docetism stems from the Greek “appear” and suggests that Jesus only appeared to be a flesh and blood human.
According to Bart Ehrman [1], a slight variation of the docetism of the ancient Christians assumed Jesus to be a real flesh-and-blood human.
www.halexandria.org /dward770.htm   (1206 words)

  
 Docetism - OrthodoxWiki
Docetism (or Illusionism) is a Christological heresy, the teaching that Jesus Christ only appeared to be man but was not in actuality.
According to Docetae (Illusionists), the eternal Son of God did not really become human, have a physical body, or suffer on the cross; he only appeared to do so, i.e., his body was an illusion, as was his crucifixion.
Docetism existed during the New Testament period and even afterwards, being addressed by both the New Testament epistles and by those of St. Ignatius of Antioch.
orthodoxwiki.org /Docetism   (123 words)

  
 Silver Street Mission -- Marrickville Baptist Church; sermon 26 October 2003
Docetism is the earliest heresy after the Judaising heresy to be clearly identified in the New Testament.
Docetism radically disconnected the divine and the human.
Docetism arises when people fear and loathe their own physical human nature.
www.pnc.com.au /~pspete1/ser/03/ser251203.html   (2237 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Docetism: Books   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Docetism comes from the Greek word dokesis, meaning appearance.
Christ only seemed to have a body, a view called Docetism, from the Greek dokeo ("to seem"), and (2) others said...
4 This heresy John is refuting became known as "docetism," formed from the Greek word Soxw that means to "think,"...
www.amazon.com /s?ie=UTF8&keywords=Docetism&tag=benlopark&index=books&link_code=qs&page=1   (972 words)

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