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Topic: Donald Hebb


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In the News (Sat 29 Nov 14)

  
  Great Canadian Psychology Researcher--Donald O. Hebb
Donald Olding Hebb was born in 1904 in Chester, Nova Scotia.
His mother was heavily influenced by ideas of Maria Montessori, an Italian physician who believed in "education of the senses before development of the intellect".
Because of this, Donald's mother home schooled him until the age of 8.
www.psych.ualberta.ca /GCPWS/dhebb.html   (49 words)

  
  Donald Olding Hebb Summary
Hebb's answer to Lashley's localization problem was that the cells of each assembly are dispersed over a large area of the cortex so that enough interconnected cells survive all but the largest lesions, ensuring that objects continue to be represented.
Hebb explained generalization by stipulating that during the initial investigations of an object, many different sensory patterns contribute inputs that are incorporated into, or closely linked to, a single cell assembly representing the object.
Donald Hebb was born in Chester, Nova Scotia and lived there until the age of 16, when his parents moved to Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.
www.bookrags.com /Donald_Olding_Hebb   (3935 words)

  
  Donald Olding Hebb
Donald Hebb was born in Chester, Nova Scotia, the oldest of four children of Arthur M. and M. Clara (Olding) Hebb, and lived there until the age of 16, when his parents moved to Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.
Donald's mother was heavily influenced by the ideas of Maria Montessori and home schooled him until the age of 8.
Hebb was a member of the American Psychological Association (APA) and was its president in 1960.
pedia.counsellingresource.com /openpedia/Donald_Olding_Hebb   (2668 words)

  
  Homo Digitalis
Donald Hebb was born in Chester, Nova Scotia, the oldest of four children of Arthur M. and M. Clara (Olding) Hebb, and lived there until the age of 16, when his parents moved to Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.
Donald's mother was heavily influenced by the ideas of Maria Montessori and home schooled him until the age of 8.
Hebb was a member of the American Psychological Association (APA) and was its president in 1960.
homodigitalis.org /wikipedia-en.html?topic=Donald_Hebb   (2146 words)

  
 D.O. Hebb (1904 - 1985)
Hebb himself was not only altogether unpretentious but also ever sceptical about his ideas.
Hebb may well have been taking the proper measure of his subject when he declined the honor of having been its greatest contributor to date.
There is also a related tendency on the part of the students of "D. O." (as Hebb was affectionately known locally) to see all good things in psychology as having issued from him.
users.ecs.soton.ac.uk /harnad/Archive/hebb.html   (1036 words)

  
 Hebb Award Recipient 2007
The awardee is invited to give the Donald O. Hebb Distinguished Contribution address at the annual BBCS meeting of that year.
Originally from Romania, Morris Moscovitch was inspired during his undergraduate years at McGill University by the case of the well-known amnesic, H. M., to go on to a career in neuropsychology.
Professor Moscovitch's approach to the study of cognition embodies Hebb's notion that behaviour seen in clinical settings should inform research.
www.csbbcs.org /hebbrec07.html   (830 words)

  
 D.O. Hebb (1904 - 1985)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This gaunt maritimer called Hebb, with his stern spectacles and portentous limp, who pronounced "calm" "cam," looked more qualified to teach us about practical seamanship than about the mysteries of the psyche (although his tone was incongruously gentle, sometimes even dreamy).
Without any particular brief for symbolic representation, Hebb had been arguing for four decades that thoughts are processes represented in the head, and that behaviorism, in an over-reaction against introspectionism, was begging the important questions in psychology.
Hebb may well have been taking the proper measure of his subject when he declined the honor of having been its greatest contributor to date.
www.ecs.soton.ac.uk /~harnad/Archive/hebb.html   (1036 words)

  
 Biographies of Donald Olding Hebb
D.O. Hebb, one of the outstanding psychologists of this century, was born in Nova Scotia and educated at Dalhousie (B.A., 1925) and McGill (M.A. He taught briefly in public schools.
Hebb then conducted research on brain-damaged patients with Wilder Penfield at the Montreal Neurological Institute (1937-1939), and after teaching at Queen's (1941-1942), went to the Yerkes Laboratories of Primate Biology as research fellow (1942-1947).
Hebb's central concern as a psychologist was to develop his neurophysiological theory of such mental functions as thought, imagery, volition, attention and memory - all problems which orthodox behaviourism tended to avoid or dismiss.
www.mcgill.ca /hebb/biographies   (455 words)

  
 Exciting new evidence of how we learn
Hebb went on to propose a simple way in which nerve connections could be altered to produce learning.
Hebb proposed that when a receptor in the forebrain or hippocampus is hit by a glutamine neurotransmitter, something else happens too.
Hebb was also right in a more fundamental way -- learning is the result of molecular interactions that take place between nerve cells in the brain.
www.txtwriter.com /Onscience/Articles/smartermice.html   (1958 words)

  
 Donald Olding Hebb (1904-1985)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Best known for the Organization of Behavior, Hebb's study of the effect of early and late brain damage on intelligence has had a major impact on the psychology of individual differences.
Importantly, Hebb's research (presented at the 1941 Annual General Meeting of the American Psychological Association) provided independent, neuropsychological support for a multifaceted intellectual structure.
Hebb's work with primates led to his anthropomorphic description of "chimpanzee horror." This is when these animals are confronted with replicas of dismembered body parts.
www.psych.usyd.edu.au /difference5/scholars/hebb.html   (164 words)

  
 Psychology 312: Brain Mechanisms   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Hebb's key idea was that stimuli and responses might activate distinct sets of neurons and that when this happened the connections within and between activated sets would be strengthened.
Hebb's cell assembly was circular in nature so that once activated it persisted for some amount of time.
Hebb's rule was implemented as the learning principle in computer simulations of the operation of ensembles of neurons (neural network or connectionist models) in the 1980's when such simulation became a feasible method of theorizing about the matters that concerned Hebb.
psycho.psy.ohio-state.edu /dept/psy312/brain.html   (1304 words)

  
 The Hebb Legacy   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Unimpressed, Hebb was "softened up for [his] encounter with Kohler’s Gestalt Psychology and Lashley’s critique of reflexology." Hebb went to work with Lashley, and in 1936 completed his PhD at Harvard on the effects of early visual deprivation upon size and brightness perception in the rat.
But Hebb believed that a class of theory was needed, of which his was merely one specific form — subject to modification or rejection in the face of new evidence, and that the primary role of our fleetingly correct theories was to stimulate scientific discovery.
Hebb’s interest in "The Nature of Thought" was the theme of a lecture series and book (1980a) celebrating his return to Dalhousie in 1977 as an honorary professor.
www.cpa.ca /Psynopsis/special_eng.html   (1673 words)

  
 once and future Hebb synapse, The Canadian Psychology - Find Articles
Hebb conjectured that cortical circuits admit selfsustaining activity that reverberated in "cell assemblies," inspired by anatomical evidence for recurrent connections between neighbouring cells in the cerebral cortex and reverberatory activity lasting for up to half a second.
Biological evidence for the Hebb rule had to wait for neurobiology to discover conditions that elicited longterm changes in synaptic strength and could be reliably studied at the cellular level.
The case for Hebb synapses was made even stronger by the discovery that the induction of LTP at some synapses is controlled by the NMDA receptor, whose activation requires the binding of the neurotransmitter glutamate to the receptor and simultaneous depolarization of the postsynaptic neuron.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_qa3711/is_200302/ai_n9174373   (882 words)

  
 Hebb, Donald O. (1904-1985) Encyclopedia of Psychology - Find Articles   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Donald Olding Hebb was born in Cheser, Nova Scotia, on July 22, 1904.
In 1937, Hebb was appointed a research fellow at the Montreal Neurological Institute, where he became involved in studies of the brain.
Hebb was a long-time member of both the Canadian and the American Psychological Assocations.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_g2699/is_0004/ai_2699000494   (466 words)

  
 sofa. rites de passage
It was proposed by Donald Hebb (1949) that cortical activity is organized in functional groups ('cell assemblies') that form the building blocks of computational processes by the coordinated activity of the participating neurons.
The McGill studies arose out of the theories of Donald O. Hebb, as published in his 1949 book The Organization of Human Behavior, and were attempts to verify his hypothesis that tedious and uniform stimulation led to a degeneration in the ability to think and reason effectively (Brownfield, 1965).
Hebb and his colleagues at McGill began their studies in 1951 with 22 male college students as subjects.
arrog.antville.org /stories/425177   (476 words)

  
 IJCNN'05 Special Session   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Hebb's ideas regarding neuronal communication have had a profound and lasting influence on the fields of neurophysiology, psychology, and computer science, to name but a few.
The selection of research is intended to reflect the broad influence of Donald Hebb in the field of neural networks.
Donald Hebb resided in Montreal during the most prominent years of his career.
faculty.uwb.edu /ijcnn05/Special-Sessions/09_Thivierge_-_Donald_Hebb.htm   (1742 words)

  
 Richard Brown   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Donald O. Hebb is best known for his neurophysiological postulate on learning, which appeared in his book The Organization of Behavior (1949/2002).
Neuroscientists associate Hebb with the Hebbian synapse and the Hebbian learning rule, and much of our current understanding of functional neural connections is based on Hebbian concepts.
This presentation reviews Hebb's life and work and its lasting influence in neuroscience in honour of the centenary of his birth in 2004.
www.science.mcmaster.ca /~BBCS/2004/viewabstract.php?id=218   (140 words)

  
 Half a century of Hebb - Nature Neuroscience
In 1949, Donald Hebb predicted a form of synaptic plasticity driven by temporal contiguity of pre- and postsynaptic activity.
Hebb believed that synaptic connections were the material basis of mental associations, but he went beyond the naive connectionism of behaviorists like J.
Second, Hebb rejected the notion that stimulus−response relationships could be explained by simple reflex arcs connecting sensory neurons to motor neurons.
www.nature.com /cgi-taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/neuro/journal/v3/n11s/full/nn1100_1166.html   (991 words)

  
 Donald Olding Hebb - Psychology Wiki - a Wikia wiki
The focus of study at McGill was more in the direction of education and intelligence, and Hebb was now more interested in physiological psychology and was critical of the methodology of the expirements there.
And while the method of signal transmission in a nervous system was later found to be due to a complex interaction of chemicals, modern artificial neural networks are still based on the transmission of signals via electrical impulses that Hebbian theory was first designed around.
Hebb, D.O. (1958) Alice in Wonderland or psychology among the biological sciences.
psychology.wikia.com /wiki/Donald_Olding_Hebb   (2555 words)

  
 Donald Hebb: A Century of Legacy
It is entitled: "Donald Hebb: a Century of Legacy".
This event is quite a propos, because Montreal was host to Donald Hebb during the most prominent years of his career.
Researchers interested in this special session are encouraged to submit a short abstract before November 1st 2004, describing their research on a topic related to Hebbian learning.
www.psych.mcgill.ca /labs/lnsc/html/hebb.html   (125 words)

  
 a-a Encyclopedia Index
Do from Donald E Belfi to Donald Judd
Do from Donald Justice to Donald Olding Hebb
Do from Donald Oliver to Donald Watts Davies
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /alpha/d.html   (1581 words)

  
 THE CEREBRAL CODE by William H. Calvin (Intermission Notes)
Experimental work in Hebb's own lab in Montreal about 1960 eventually provided evidence for various specialized groups participating in what seemed to be a unitary percept, such as that of a triangle or square.
Lorente's reverberating circuits may have gotten Hebb to thinking about neuronal ensembles about 1940, but they really aren't needed to get sustained activity -- something we only learned about in the early 1960s, once we were able to control the firing rate of a single neuron during intracellular recording.
Hebb's dual trace memory is thereby implemented: any adjacent pair of these hexagonal circuits could later reconstitute the firing pattern in all of the multiple triangular arrays that were originally formed during the original stimulus presentation.
williamcalvin.com /bk9/bk9inter.htm   (3444 words)

  
 Carlson
Donald Hebb was the first winner (in 1980) of the Donald O. Hebb Award of the Canadian Psychological Association and the 1961 winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.
Bryan Kolb was the 2000 winner of the Donald O. Hebb Award of the Canadian Psychological Association and was elected to the Royal Society of Canada in 2000.
Brenda Milner was the 1981 winner of the Donald O. Hebb Award of the Canadian Psychological Association and the 1973 winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.
www.pearsoned.ca /highered/divisions/hss/carlson/student/srs_docs/srs4.html   (631 words)

  
 The Unlearned Reverberatory Circuit: Lashley's Legacy to Hebb, and How Hebb Invested itThe Unlearned Reverberatory ...   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Talking to Hebb at the convention was the first step in a process that included a visit to the exotic foreign city of Montreal, where I stayed with the French-speaking family of another Cornell graduate student.
At 75+, Hebb may not, as Orbach reported, have been willing to go on the lecture circuit as a superannuated celebrity like his respected colleague B. Skinner, but he was certainly capable of writing a realistic evaluation of his own contribution, a theoretical prospectus, and an interesting philosophical speculation on neuropsychology and psychology in general.
Hebb's original perceptual cell assemblies were created by the successive firing of neurons representing un-analysable perceptual units (Lashley's term) linked by eye movements, and Hebb thought that cortical neurons that triggered eye movements were involved as the assemblies were formed.
psycprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk /perl/local/psyc/makedoc?id=696&type=xml   (1946 words)

  
 Richard Brown   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Donald O. Hebb has had a profound effect on the development of modern psychology and neuroscience.
As 2004 is the 100th anniversary of his birth, it seems fitting to have a symposium to celebrate his life and work.
The four speakers provide a biographical view of Hebb's life and work (Brown); his relationship with his PhD supervisor and mentor, Karl Lashley (Bruce); his contribution to cognitive neuroscience (Klein) and his influence on behavioural neuroscience (Harley).
www.science.mcmaster.ca /~BBCS/2004/viewabstract.php?id=218&symposium=1   (104 words)

  
 Ratting on Donald Hebb
However, it may have a germ of truth in that he initiated one of the first experiments on the effects of deprivation of early experience.
In it Hymovitch refers to Hebb's experiment as involving presumably control rats raised as "pets" [quotes in the original].
As for cell assemblies, I believe they were purely an abstract concept for Hebb, and he never made any attempt to locate them in the brain.
www.mail-archive.com /tips@fre.fsu.umd.edu/msg05507.html   (476 words)

  
 Donald O. Hebb
This assumption was a bold move on Hebb's part, since at the time he had no evidence for it whatsoever.
In his lecture, Licklider went on to explain Hebb's second assumption: that the selective strengthening of the synapses would cause the brain to organize itself into "cell assemblies"-subsets of several thousand neurons in which circulating nerve impulses would reinforce themselves and continue to circulate.
Hebb considered these cell assemblies to be the brain's basic building blocks of information.
userwww.sfsu.edu /~rob/Hebb.html   (1439 words)

  
 Donald O - Moviefone
Donald O?Connor is buried in the Forest Lawn - Hollywood Hills Cemetery in...
When one is not equipped to write an objective biographical tribute on the occasion of a great man's passing,...
Donald O - Filmography, Biography, News, Photos, Birth date, Relationships, Donald O Film Clips, and Fun Facts on Moviefone.
movies.aol.com /celebrity/donald-o/53717/main   (85 words)

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