Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Douglas Bader


Related Topics

In the News (Sun 18 Aug 19)

  
  Douglas Bader - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Bader is upheld as an inspirational leader and hero of the era, not least because he fought despite having lost both legs in a pre-war flying accident.
Bader was an outspoken critic of the careful 'husbanding' tactics being used by 11 Group commander Keith Park, and Bader vociferously campaigned for an aggressive policy of assembling large formations of defensive fighters north of London ready to inflict maximum damage on the massed German bomber formations as they flew over South East England.
Bader's artificial legs are on display at the RAF Museum at Stafford, although this is not a museum that is open to the public.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Douglas_Bader   (1838 words)

  
 Douglas Bader
Bader was commissioned as an officer in the Royal Air Force in 1930 but after only 18 months he crashed his aeroplane and as a result of the accident had to have both legs amputated.
Bader was now promoted by Air Vice Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory and was given command of 242 Squadron, which had suffered 50 per cent casualties in just a couple of weeks.
Bader was freed at the end of the Second World War and when he returned to Britain he was promoted to group captain.
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk /2WWbaderD.htm   (1930 words)

  
 The Douglas Bader Foundation
Douglas Bader was born in London in 1910.
Douglas was commissioned as an officer in the Royal Air Force in 1930 but after only 18 months he crashed his aeroplane and became a double amputee caused by “my own fault” in an aeroplane accident in 1931.
As a consequence of the accident Douglas was discharged from the RAF.
www.douglasbaderfoundation.co.uk /content/DBF/DBF_Information/AboutDB.html   (379 words)

  
 WW II ACE STORIES
Douglas Robert Steuart Bader was born on February 10, 1910, in London, England, son of Frederick Roberts Bader and Jessie Bader.
Bader was uninjured, except for bent legs and a badly dented ego.
Bader quickly transformed 242 into a tight, tough squadron through his courage, leadership and uncompromising attitude toward his pilots, ground crews and the RAF high command, with whom he soon had a major brush.
www.elknet.pl /acestory/bader/bader.htm   (2937 words)

  
 BBC - h2g2 - Group Captain Sir Douglas Bader, DSO DFC
Sir Douglas Bader, a World War II hero, was injured in a plane crash before the war even started - yet he still was able to distinguish himself in the RAF during the war and became famous enough to have a pub named after him.
Douglas Robert Steuart Bader was born in London in 1910.
Douglas was pulled from the wreckage and rushed to hospital.
www.bbc.co.uk /dna/h2g2/A8248241   (922 words)

  
 Douglas Bader (via CobWeb/3.1 planet03.csc.ncsu.edu)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Douglas Bader Sir Douglas Robert Steuart Bader (February 10 1910 (St John's Wood, London) - September 5 1982), was a successful fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War.
Bader is upheld as an inspirational leader and hero of the era, not least because he fought in spite of having both legs amputated.
Bader was regarded as an above-average pilot and an outstanding sportsman, coming close to national team selection in rugby.
douglas-bader.iqnaut.net.cob-web.org:8888   (599 words)

  
 The Biography Channel - Douglas Bader Biography
Douglas Bader’s father was a major in the British Army in World War I who was injured badly by shrapnel in 1917, and would go onto die of those wounds in 1922.
Bader took to flying like a duck to water, going solo after only six and a half hours tuition.
Bader was knighted in 1976, and he died in 1982.
www.thebiographychannel.co.uk /biography_home/464:0/Douglas_Bader.htm   (350 words)

  
 Biography for Douglas Bader   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Douglas Bader, the son of a soldier killed in the First World War, was born in London in 1910.
Bader was commissioned as an officer in the Royal Air Force in 1930 but after only 18 months he crashed his plane and as a result of the accident had to have both legs amputated.
Bader was now promoted by Vice Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory and was given command of 242 Squadron, which had suffered 50 per cent casualties in just a couple of weeks.
us.imdb.com /name/nm0046035/bio   (663 words)

  
 About Douglas Bader   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Douglas Bader is well-known as an "ace" fighter pilot from World War II: he was a key figure in the Battle of Britain and shot down 23 enemy aircraft during the course of the war, making him number 11 in the RAF's tally of top fighter pilots.
Douglas Robert Steuart Bader was born on the 21st February 1910.
Bader proved that he could control an aircraft in flight but the RAF medical board were not so easily convinced and refused to pass him fit for flying, because the "King's Regulations" did not allow for the possibility of a pilot with no legs!
www.martleweb.co.uk /douglasbader/dbvc.html   (668 words)

  
 Goodwood Aviation
On 9th August 2001, The Duke of Richmond and Lady Bader unveiled a sculpture, at Goodwood Aerodrome, of the legendary fighter pilot, Douglas Bader.
Douglas Bader was an inspirational leader; he was a charismatic figure who had lost both legs in a flying accident some years before the war; despite this disability, he displayed flying skills and leadership qualities of the highest order, which made him a household name during and after the war.
The charity "The Douglas Bader Foundation" carries on that work to this day, and was well represented at the unveiling.
www.goodwood.co.uk /aviation/bader.htm   (268 words)

  
 Douglas Bader quiz -- free game
Douglas met his first wife, Thelma, at a roadside café where she was working as a waitress.
In his support of the 'Big Wing' theory, Douglas argued that all British fighters should have a larger wing to enable them to fly higher than the enemy and so aid interception.
Bader preferred an all-machine gun armament on his Spitfire fighter to the newly introduced cannon and machine guns armament.
www.funtrivia.com /playquiz.cfm?qid=171841   (210 words)

  
 Reach for the Sky: The Story of Douglas Bader, Legless Ace of the Baffle of Britain. . - Net Assessment - book review ...
Young Bader flourished in the clubby atmosphere typical of the Royal Air Force (RAF) between the wars, excelling at rugby, boxing, and cricket (in which he was scheduled to compete for England).
Bader rebuilt a demoralized squadron, devised new fighter tactics and formations, and fought gallantly in the Battle of Britain.
Bader's is really a good story of determination, courage, and refusal to accept what others define as the limits of the possible.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m0NXL/is_4_16/ai_97737383   (759 words)

  
 [No title]
However, unobserved by the public and even most of his friends, Douglas Bader was bringing hope to people all over the world who had suffered disabilities such as his.
What I found out later was that Douglas Bader for many years acted as an angel of mercy, travelling long distances at his own expense to hospitals to visit children who had lost their limbs, and by demonstrating how well he managed on his own tin legs brought new hope into their shattered lives.
Douglas Bader hated publicity and if he were alive to day and heard what was being said, he'd probably puff away at his pipe, laugh a bit, then say "bloody idiots!" And that would be that.
members.lycos.co.uk /jadastra/Bader.html   (1736 words)

  
 [No title]
Douglas Bader under went Officer training at RAF Cranwell in Lincolnshire, then got posted to No 23 Squadron to fly the Gloster Gamecock.
Causing havoc throughout his internment, Bader was sent to Colditz for the rest of the war.
Bader left the RAF in 1946 and took up a position with Shell Oil which involved him flying around the world.
homepage.ntlworld.com /p.whitehead/page2.html   (284 words)

  
 Douglas Bader   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Douglas Bader, often called "The Legless Wonder," stands out as a remarkable figure, even among the unique characters in the Royal Air Force.
An early convert to aviation, Bader graduated from the RAF College at Cranwell in 1930.
Such was his status among fliers that his German hosts informed the RAF of his capture and allowed a substitute set of legs to be dropped for him.
mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk /battleofbritain/douglasbader.html   (269 words)

  
 TIME.com: One Valuable Man -- Aug. 25, 1941 -- Page 1   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Douglas Bader cracked up bringing an R.A.F. plane out of a slow roll in 1931, woke up with both legs amputated, one at the thigh, one at the knee.
Douglas Bader learned to fox trot, play cricket, turn a backward somersault, finally had one leg shortened for further agility.
Last week the Berlin radio announced that Douglas Bader's plane had been shot down over the coast of France, he had bailed out, been found by the Germans, and was now a prisoner of war in Germany.
www.time.com /time/magazine/article/0,9171,765972,00.html   (463 words)

  
 Douglas Bader - A true RAF Fighter ace - WW2inColor Talk
Challenged to perform various acrobatic stunts, Bader protested that the Bulldog planes that they had begun using were very different from what he had been flying, much heavier, and as such he wouldn’t be able to perform the stunts safely.
Bader’s amazing aura of invincibility was broken in 1941 when the plane he was flying collided with a German Messerschmit, and the Nazis captured him.
Bader wanted the Sqns used as they were in 1942, where the Fighter Directors gave the enemy's position and left the fighting to those on the scene and merely ensured there were sufficient numbers in the area to deal with the threat.
www.ww2incolor.com /forum/showthread.php?t=3370   (1637 words)

  
 Telegraph | News
A STATUE to Group Captain Sir Douglas Bader, one of the Battle of Britain's best-known heroes and a man whose name became synonymous with triumph over adversity, will be unveiled next week.
Bader, whose life was featured in the film Reach for the Sky, starring Kenneth More, joined the RAF in 1930 at the age of 20.
Bader said that he was "lucky" and the publicity surrounding him was "not because I was better than others but because I was the chap with the tin legs".
www.telegraph.co.uk /news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2001/08/04/nbader04.xml   (864 words)

  
 William Sholto Douglas
In 1936 Douglas was appointed as director of staff studies in the Air Ministry.
After the Second World War Douglas became Commander in Chief and Military Governor of the British Occupation Zone in Germany and in January 1946 was knighted and promoted to marshal of the RAF.
Douglas retired from active duty in 1948 and was awarded a peerage as 1st Baron Douglas of Kirtleside.
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk /2WWdouglasS.htm   (645 words)

  
 Golf Gets Personal with Brent Morrison » Blog Archive » The Story of Douglas Bader
Born in London in 1910, Douglas Bader was immediately separated from his parents who left for India.
Bader responded magnificently and graduated into the RAF, narrowly missing out on receiving the Sword of Honor, awarded to the best graduate of the year.
Bader’s amazing aura of invincibility was broken in 1941 when the plane he was flying collided with a German Messerschmitt, and the Nazis captured him.
www.golfradio.ca /?p=32   (1157 words)

  
 Amazon.co.uk: Bader: The Man and His Men (Cassell Military Classics): Books: Michael Burns   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Douglas Bader: A Biography of the Legendary World War II Fighter Pilot (Airlife's Classics) by John Frayn Turner
This volume portrays Bader as a pilot and leader, whose endeavours and techniques were emulated by his colleagues.
Douglas Bader had lost both his legs in a flying accident before World War 2 broke out, but he was accepted for flying duties on the strength of his ability as a pilot.
www.amazon.co.uk /Bader-His-Cassell-Military-Classics/dp/0304350524   (967 words)

  
 Reach For The Sky - Kenneth More 1956
How easy it would have been for pilot Douglas Bader, played by Kenneth More here, to simply give in to circumstances, drop out of active life, and lead a limited existence all because of a dreadful plane accident in which he lost both legs.
Douglas Bader had an amazing spirit, and lived life to the fullest.
The film covers Baders life, and the loss of his legs in a flying accident that was in truth of his own making, and then how he puts his life back together afterwards.
www.learmedia.ca /product_info.php/products_id/34   (1083 words)

  
 douglas bader spitfire RAF aviaion art   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
This was the call sign for W/C Douglas Bader D.S.O and Bar, D.F.C and two Bars.
Bader lost his legs in a flying accident in 1931 while flying with the RAF.
As a wing leader Bader was entitled to have his initials on his Spitfire.
www.durnanavart.com /bader.htm   (93 words)

  
 Wing Commander Douglas Bader   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
One of the most well-known airmen of World War II, Bader's triumph over disablement, following the loss of both legs in a flying accident in 1931, and his subsequent acceptance back into the RAF, became as legendary as his reputation as a pilot with No. 242 Squadron, RAF Fighter Command.
Although greatly respected by his German adversaries, his individual approach to the problem of enemy interception (i.e.
In 1941 he was captured after a mid-air collision with an enemy aircraft.
expage.com /douglasbader   (103 words)

  
 The Douglas Bader Foundation /content/DBF/popup1
Douglas became an inspiration to disabled and able-bodied alike by demonstrating the ability to “get on with your life”.
Douglas was honoured in 1976 with a Knighthood for his contribution and work on behalf of the disabled.
It is this maxim that our charitable foundation established in Douglas’ name immediately following his death in 1982, seeks to replicate.
www.douglasbaderfoundation.com   (345 words)

  
 Plane Writing: pilots biographies 2
Born in 1910, Douglas Robert Steuart Bader seems to have taken after a grandfather called John Steuart Amos - an adventurer who went to India in 1840 and 'was able to express himself rather forcefully'.
Late December 1931, Bader felt he had to demonstrate his superior low flying skill at a nearby flying club, and crashed coming out of the roll.
Douglas Bader died in 1982, 72 years old.
www.xs4all.nl /~blago/planewriting/bios2.html   (3824 words)

  
 Bader-Legend
However the outbreak of war saw Bader reinstated in the RAF and, complete with artificial legs, piloting a Spitfire in the thick of the action at the time of Dunkirk.
Typically, Bader quickly dispelled their doubts with a brilliant and daring aerobatic demonstration in his Hurricane, and within a few weeks the dynamic Squadron Leader transformed the dispirited Canadians into one of the RAF's elite fight units.
Featured in Robert's drawing is Douglas Bader's MkI Hurricane in the markings of No. 242 Squadron, Bader's command throughout the Battle of Britain.
www.milartgl.com /HTML/Bader-Legend.htm   (322 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.