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Topic: Dutch East India Company


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In the News (Sun 21 Apr 19)

  
  East India Company - MSN Encarta
East India Company, any of a number of commercial enterprises formed in western Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries to further trade with the East Indies.
The most important of the companies were given charters by their respective governments, authorizing them to acquire territory wherever they could and to exercise in the acquired territory various functions of government, including legislation, the issuance of currency, the negotiation of treaties, the waging of war, and the administration of justice.
The East India Company, however, bought control of this new company, and in 1702 an act of Parliament amalgamated the two as “The United Company of Merchants of England Trading to the East Indies.” The charter was renewed several times in the 18th century, each time with financial concessions to the Crown.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761571539/East_India_Company.html   (1195 words)

  
  The Dutch East India Company - LoveToKnow 1911
Companies described as "Van Ferne"- that is, of the distant seas - were formed, and by 1602 from sixty to seventy Dutch vessels had sailed to Hindustan and the Indian Archipelago.
The history of the Dutch East India Company from its formation in 1602 until its dissolution in 1798 is filled, until the close of the 17th century, with wars and diplomatic relations.
The rivalry and the hostilities of French and English gradually drove the Dutch from the mainland of Asia and from Ceylon.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /The_Dutch_East_India_Company   (0 words)

  
 East India Company - MSN Encarta
The most important companies were given charters by their respective governments, authorizing them to acquire territory wherever they could and to exercise in the acquired territory various functions of government, including legislation, the issue of currency, the negotiation of treaties, the waging of war, and the administration of justice.
In 1784 the India Act created a department of the British government to exercise political, military, and financial control over the Indian affairs of the company, and for the next half century British control was extended over most of the subcontinent.
The company continued its administrative functions until the Indian Mutiny (1857-1859), a widespread revolt that began with the Indian soldiers in the company’s Bengal army.
uk.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761571539/East_India_Company.html   (1248 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Dutch East India Trading Company
East India Company, any of a number of commercial enterprises formed in western Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries to further trade with the East Indies.
The most important of the companies were given charters by their respective governments, authorizing them to acquire territory wherever they could and to exercise in the acquired territory various functions of government, including legislation, the issuance of currency, the negotiation of treaties, the waging of war, and the administration of justice.
The East India Company, however, bought control of this new company, and in 1702 an act of Parliament amalgamated the two as “The United Company of Merchants of England Trading to the East Indies.” The charter was renewed several times in the 18th century, each time with financial concessions to the Crown.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Dutch-East-India-Trading-Company   (0 words)

  
 Dutch East India Company
The Dutch East India Company (''Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie'' or ''VOC'' in Dutch, literally "United East Indies Company") was established on March 20, 1602, when the Estates-General Of The Netherlands granted it a 21-year monopoly to carry out colonial activities in Asia.
The flag of the company was orange, white, blue (similar to the current Dutch flag) with the company logo embroidered on it.
The company was in almost constant conflict with the English/British; relations were particularly embittered after the Amboyna Massacre in 1623.
www.seattleluxury.com /encyclopedia/entry/Dutch_East_India_Company   (1175 words)

  
 Dutch East Indies Summary
The Dutch East Indies, or Netherlands East Indies, (Dutch: Nederlands-Indië; Indonesian: Hindia Belanda) was the name of the colonies set up by the Dutch East India Company, which came under administration of the Netherlands during the 19th century (see Indonesia).
After the company was liquidated in 1799 (decades before the British HEIC was taken over in the form of crown colonies), and after a British interregnum — strategic custody — during the Napoleonic Wars, the Dutch government effectively took over the administration.
However, pressure from Australia and newly-independent India forced a negotiation brokered by the United States of America resulting in the Round Table Conference of 1949 in which the Dutch acknowledged the sovereignty of Indonesia excepting the region of western New Guinea.
www.bookrags.com /Dutch_East_Indies   (0 words)

  
  Dutch East India Company information - Search.com
Dutch colonial possessions, with the Dutch East India Company possessions marked in a paler green, surrounding the Indian Ocean plus Saint Helena in the mid-Atlantic.
The Dutch East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie or VOC in Dutch, literally "United East Indies Company") was established on March 20, 1602, when the Estates-General of the Netherlands granted it a 21-year monopoly to carry out colonial activities in Asia.
The East Indies were awarded to the Kingdom of the Netherlands by the Congress of Vienna in 1815.
www.search.com /reference/Dutch_East_India_Company   (1224 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Dutch East Indies   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Dutch East Indies, or Netherlands East Indies, was the name of Indonesia under the administration of the Netherlands.
After the Dutch East India Company was liquidated in 1799, and after a British interregnum during the Napoleonic Wars, the Dutch government took over administration until the independence of Indonesia in 1949 following the Indonesian National Revolution.
Sukarno proclaimed the East Indies independent in 1945, but the Netherlands successfully tried to thwart it in two wars until UN and other diplomatic pressure affected the outcomes.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/du/Dutch_East_Indies   (202 words)

  
 Dutch East India Company – FREE Dutch East India Company Information | Encyclopedia.com: Facts, Pictures, ...
The company's Chinese pirates: how the Dutch East India Company tried to lead a coalition of pirates to war against China; 1621-1662.
this crown was the Dutch East India Company.
The English East India Company and India, concentrates on the Company in its commercial...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-X-DutchEIC.html   (904 words)

  
 1614 The East India companies
The Dutch had found that competition among their merchant-venturers to buy spices in the East was raising the price: so, hey presto, form a unified company, and grant it a monopoly east of the Cape of Good Hope.
Dutch or British, the men on the spot were no less ready to pocket their employers’ money, making up for low pay with embezzlement and trading on their own account.
The Dutch one declined, as the country’s industry did, in 1750-1800, to be wound up on the last day of the 18th century.
www.uwec.edu /geography/Ivogeler/w111/estindia.htm   (0 words)

  
 Glossary: East India Company
East India Company was the name of several historic European companies chartered with the monopoly of trading with Asia for their respective countries.
The Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie or VOC in Dutch, literally "United East Indies Company") was established on March 20, 1602, when the Estates-General of the Netherlands granted it a monopoly to carry out colonial activities in Asia.
The venture was inspired by the success of the British East India Company and grew to become the largest trading company in Sweden during the 18th century, until it closed in 1813.
www.gotheborg.com /glossary/data/eastindiacompany.shtml   (3211 words)

  
  Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies - Biocrawler
The Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies represented the Dutch rule in the Dutch East Indies between 1610 and the recognition of the independence of Indonesia in 1949.
After the VOC was dissolved in 1796, the Dutch East Indies became a colony of the Netherlands, and the Governors-General were appointed by the Dutch government.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Governor-General_of_the_Dutch_East_Indies   (106 words)

  
  DUTCH EAST INDIA COMPANY - LoveToKnow Article on DUTCH EAST INDIA COMPANY   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Companies described as Van Ferne that is, 0f the distant seaswere formed, and by 1602 from sixty to seventy Dutch vessels had sailed to Hindustan and the Indian Archipelago.
The history of the Dutch East India Company from its formation in 1602 until its dissolution in 1798 is filled, until the close of the 17th century, with wars and diplomatic relations.
The rivalry and the hostilities of French and English gradually drove the Dutch from the mainland of Asia and from Ceylon.
100.1911encyclopedia.org /D/DU/DUTCH_EAST_INDIA_COMPANY.htm   (1531 words)

  
 Dutch East India Company - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Dutch colonial possessions, with the Dutch East India Company possessions marked in a paler green, surrounding the Indian Ocean plus Saint Helena in the mid-Atlantic.
The Dutch East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie or VOC in Dutch, literally "United East Indies Company") was established on March 20, 1602, when the Estates-General of the Netherlands granted it a 21-year monopoly to carry out colonial activities in Asia.
The East Indies were awarded to the Kingdom of the Netherlands by the Congress of Vienna in 1815.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dutch_East_India_Company   (1233 words)

  
 Dutch West India Company - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The WIC was organised similar to the (far greater and richer) Dutch East India Company (VOC), which had a trade monopoly for Asia (mainly present Indonesia) since 1602, except for the fact that the WIC was not allowed to conduct military operations without approval of the Dutch government.
After the English took control of Suriname for several years in the 1780s, the WIC appeared unable to recover from this, and in 1791, the stocks of the company were bought by the Dutch government, and the territories were placed under its control.
Dutch Portuguese Colonial HistoryDutch Portuguese Colonial History: history of the Portuguese and the Dutch in Ceylon, India, Malacca, Bengal, Formosa, Africa, Brazil.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dutch_West_India_Company   (571 words)

  
 Dutch East India Company
The Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie or VOC in Dutch, literally "United East Indies Company") was established on March 20, 1602, when the government of the Netherlands granted it a monopoly to trade with Asia.
In 1664, Koxinga expelled the Dutch from Taiwan.
After the fourth war between the Dutch Republic and England (1780-1784), the VOC got into financial trouble, and in 1798, the company was dissolved.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/vo/VOC.html   (277 words)

  
 South Sea Bubble tulip frenzy Dutch East India Company rich trades
The Dutch solution was the United East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie or VOC), a chartered, joint-stock company overseen by a federal board of directors.
Dutch expectations were that hard work would deliver the spice trade into their hands, while a spice market, with unlimited demand, would serve as a never-ending source of wealth.
The Dutch were willing to go to war to protect their markets, but at times the markets they were dependent on were those of the nations they were at war with, and a permanent state of war was not an environment conducive to trade.
www.periclespress.com /Dutch_tulip.html   (3193 words)

  
 Dutch East India
The Dutch tried to establish one such monopoly on tin and early Dutch efforts in the Malay Peninsula were concentrated on securing a firm control of the tin trade on the west coast.
The Dutch adopted their traditional policy of signing treaties with the Malay tin-producing states, followed by the setting up of fortified trading posts or factories, as they were called.
For example, in 1651 the Dutch factory in Perak was destroyed by the Malays, and this was followed by a short period of hostilities, before a peace treaty was signed in 1655.
www.sabrizain.demon.co.uk /malaya/dutch.htm   (1145 words)

  
 W.Michel: Travels of the Dutch East India Company in the Japanese Archipelago.
The Dutch East India Company, or Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC), was active on the Japanese stage from 1609 onward, initially competing with the "southern barbarians" - as the Iberians were called in Japan - and then briefly with an English trading post.
Fig.25 Engelbert Kaempfer: The Dutch retinue on the journey to the court of the shogun in Edo.
After transferring to the Dutch East India Company in Batavia in 1642 with the rank of adelborst, a sort of naval cadet, he rapidly rose to assistant and map-copyist.
www.flc.kyushu-u.ac.jp /~michel/publ/books/05/05.html   (7139 words)

  
 Dutch east India Company .............
It was the Dutch, and not the English, who challenged Portuguese first in the Indian Ocean by rounding Cape of Good Hope in 1595 (which British had done in 1591), depriving Portuguese of their hold on Straits of Islands.
The Dutch had 15 voyages to the East between 1595 to 1601, and in 1602, combined several companies for trading with India into Dutch United East India Company (VOC) with powers of attack and conquest.
In 1619 AD, the Dutch intercepted four English ships, compelling them to come to terms and in the 1619 treaty the Dutch Company was allowed half of the trade in pepper against English monopoly and the Dutch allowed the English one third of fine spices.
www.panhwar.com /Article58.htm   (8782 words)

  
 Dutch East India Company: The Dutch Trading Empire
The Dutch East India Company was a joint stock company who monopolized the spice trade of the 17th century.
The Dutch East India Company was a first of its kind in Northern Europe, having taken trade routes away from the Germanic Hanseatic League.
By 1620, the Dutch East India Company was the biggest trading corporation in all of Europe and a force to be reckoned with.
dutch-history.suite101.com /article.cfm/dutch_east_india_company   (620 words)

  
 Dutch East India Company - Information from Reference.com
The Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie or VOC in old-spelling Dutch, literally "United East Indian Company") was established in 1602, when the States-General of the Netherlands granted it a 21-year monopoly to carry out colonial activities in Asia.
In 1604, a second British East India Company voyage commanded by Sir Henry Middleton reached the islands of Ternate, Tidore, Ambon and Banda; in Banda, they encountered severe VOC hostility, which saw the beginning of Anglo-Dutch competition for access to spices.
During the 18th century, the possessions of the Company were increasingly focused on the East Indies.
www.reference.com /search?q=Dutch+East+India+Company   (0 words)

  
 Taiwan History. Taiwan Under the Dutch.
The Dutch East India Company eventually annexed the whole of the Southeast Asian archipelago, and the Spice Islands became known as the Dutch East Indies.
The Dutch built their settlement at Fort Orange in Taiwan, which was later to become known as Fort Zeelandia (or Anping in Chinese), located in the present city of Tainan in southern Taiwan.
The Dutch were very pleased with this compromise agreement, and not to be satisfied with just a trading post, they soon converted Taiwan into a full-blown colony similar to their empire in the Dutch East Indies.
www.geocities.com /apapadimos/Taiwan_Pages/Taiwan_History_2.htm   (1191 words)

  
 Dutch East India
The Dutch felt that the capture of Portuguese outposts and trade in Asia would be an important second front that would lead towards the eventual defeat of the main enemy, Spain, and they established the Dutch East India Company (Verenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, VOC), in 1602.
The Dutch tried to establish one such monopoly on tin and early Dutch efforts in the Malay Peninsula were concentrated on securing a firm control of the tin trade on the west coast.
The Dutch adopted their traditional policy of signing treaties with the Malay tin-producing states, followed by the setting up of fortified trading posts or factories, as they were called.
www.sabrizain.org /malaya/dutch.htm   (1145 words)

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