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Topic: Dutch East Indies


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In the News (Sat 20 Apr 19)

  
  Batavia, Dutch East Indies - LoveToKnow 1911
BATAVIA, a city and seaport on the north coast of the island of Java, and the capital of all the Dutch settlements in the East.
The population of Batavia is varied, the Dutch residents being a comparatively small class, and greatly intermixed with Portuguese and Malays.
In 1811 a British armament was sent against the Dutch settlements in Java, which had been incorporated by France, and to this force Batavia surrendered on the 8th of August.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Batavia,_Dutch_East_Indies   (1034 words)

  
  Dutch East Indies - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Dutch East Indies, or Netherlands East Indies, (Dutch: Nederlands-Indië) was the name of the colonies set up by the Dutch East India Company, which came under administration of the Netherlands during the 19th century (see Indonesia).
Dutch penetration into the East Indies, which was Portugal's sphere, was slow and discreet.
Dutch colonial possessions, with the Dutch East India Company possessions marked in a paler green, surrounding the Indian Ocean plus Saint Helena in the mid-Atlantic.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dutch_East_Indies   (835 words)

  
 Dutch East India Company - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie or VOC in Dutch, literally "United East Indies Company") was established on March 20, 1602, when the Estates-General of the Netherlands granted it a monopoly to carry out colonial activities in Asia.
Other colonial outposts were also established in the East Indies what later became Indonesia, such as on the Spice Islands (Moluccas), which include the Banda Islands where the VOC forcibly maintained a monopoly over nutmeg and mace.
The East Indies were awarded to the Kingdom of the Netherlands by the Congress of Vienna in 1815.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dutch_East_India_Company   (1031 words)

  
 Batavia, Dutch East Indies (Residency) - LoveToKnow 1911
BATAVIA, a residency of the island of Java, Dutch East Indies, bounded E., S. and W. by the residencies of Krawana, Preanger and Bantam, and N. by the Java Sea.
A large strip of hill-country, almost corresponding to the present southern or Buitenzorg division of the residency, was appropriated by the governor-general in 1745 and attached to that office.
The principal towns are Batavia, which is the capital of the residency, as well as the seat of government of the whole Dutch East Indies, Meester Cornelis, Tangerang, Bekasi and Buitenzorg.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Batavia,_Dutch_East_Indies_(Residency)   (434 words)

  
 Encyclopedia article: Dutch East Indies   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dutch penetration into the East Indies (A group of islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans between Asia and Australia), which was Portugal (A republic in southwestern Europe on the Iberian Peninsula; Portuguese explorers and colonists in the 15th and 16th centuries created a vast overseas empire (including Brazil)) 's sphere, was slow and discreet.
In the Indies, the foundation of Batavia (additional info and facts about Batavia) formed the permanent center from which Dutch enterprises, more mercantile than colonial, could be coordinated.
The capital of the Dutch East Indies was Batavia (additional info and facts about Batavia), now known as Jakarta (Capital and largest city of Indonesia; located on the island of Java; founded by the Dutch in 17th century).
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/d/du/dutch_east_indies.htm   (305 words)

  
 Dutch East India Company
The Dutch East India Company (''Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie'' or ''VOC'' in Dutch, literally "United East Indies Company") was established on March 20, 1602, when the Estates-General Of The Netherlands granted it a 21-year monopoly to carry out colonial activities in Asia.
Other colonial outposts were also established in the East Indies what later became Indonesia, such as on the Spice Islands (Moluccas), which include the Banda Islands where the VOC forcibly maintained a monopoly over Nutmeg and Mace.
The East Indies were awarded to the Kingdom Of The Netherlands by the Congress Of Vienna in 1815.
www.seattleluxury.com /encyclopedia/entry/Dutch_East_India_Company   (1175 words)

  
 Reference for Dutch East Indies - Search.com
The Dutch East Indies, or Netherlands East Indies, (Dutch: Nederlands-Indië; Indonesian: Hindia-Belanda) was formed from the nationalised colonies of the former Dutch East India Company that came under the administration of the Netherlands during the nineteenth century, and now form modern-day Indonesia.
Although Java was under Dutch domination for most of the 350 years of the combined VOC and Dutch East Indies era, many areas remained independent for much of this time including Aceh, Lombok, and Borneo.
During the Dutch East Indies era, the most prolonged conflicts were the Padri War in Sumatra (1821–38), the Java War (1825–30) led by Prince Diponegoro, and a bloody thirty-year war in Aceh.
www.search.com /reference/Dutch_East_Indies   (1885 words)

  
 Indonesia, the country my mother was born
In 1602 the Dutch parliament granted to the Dutch East India Company a charter that gave it a trading monopoly with all countries east of the Cape of Good Hope in Africa and west of the Strait of Magellan in South America.
The Netherlands lost a war against Indonesian nationalists in the East Indies, and in 1949 the Netherlands formally transferred sovereignty in the East Indies (excluding Netherlands New Guinea) to the Indonesian government.
Forgotten Campaign: The Dutch East Indies Campaign 1941-1942 This website is dedicated to the study of the Japanese Invasion of the Dutch East Indies (DEI) in 1941-1942.
www.thehollandring.com /indonesia.htm   (861 words)

  
 Paul van der Velde - The Royal Dutch Geographical Society and the Dutch East Indies, 1873-1914
The Dutch government was perceptive enough not to join in the race for new territories in the 1870s.
The Dutch Geographical Society, which was founded in 1873, has a role in such a reassessment, and it is also possible to view the foundation of the society within the framework of the increase of private initiative in the Dutch East Indies.
Since the majority of the Dutch in the Dutch East Indies were opposed to these kinds of provocation, they also opposed the scientific expedition of the society because they viewed it as a veiled attempt to extend control over Sumatra in an amoral way.
www.paulvandervelde.nl /geo_imp.html   (4905 words)

  
 biology - Dutch East Indies
The Dutch East Indies, or Netherlands East Indies, (Dutch: Nederlands Indië) was the name of the colonies set up by the Dutch East India Company, which came under administration of the Netherlands during the 19th century (see Indonesia).
In 1605 armed Dutch merchantmen captured the Portuguese fort at Amboyna in the Moluccas, which was developed into the first secure base of the V.O.C., as the Dutch called their Company.
By concentrating on monopolies in the fine spices, Dutch policy encouraged monoculture: Amboyna for cloves, Timor for sandalwood, the Bandas for mace and nutmeg.
www.biologydaily.com /biology/Dutch_East_Indies   (484 words)

  
 goDutch » Book Store
In 1628 the Dutch East India Company loaded the Batavia, the flagship of its fleet, with a king’s ransom in gold, silver, and gems for her maiden voyage to Java.
Toward the end of the sixteenth century, the Dutch were fighting to establish their independence from Spain, and overseas trading and colonial explorations were a vital part of tha...
A fictionalized memoir of family life in the former colonial Dutch East Indies, the novel is the story of the once powerful De Paulys, and especially Aunt Sophie, the matriarch, wh...
www.godutch.com /store/index.php?cid=2   (1094 words)

  
 Search Results for "Dutch East Indies"   (Site not responding. Last check: )
As governor-general for the Dutch East India Company in the East Indies after 1636, he captured Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and Malacca from the Portuguese....
...Formerly the administrative and military headquarters of the Netherlands East Indies, it is the third largest city in Indonesia, an industrial hub, a famous educational...
Mataram, with the port of Ampenan nearby, is the chief town.
bartleby.com /cgi-bin/texis/webinator/65search?query=Dutch+East+Indies   (250 words)

  
 Dutch East Indies – FREE Dutch East Indies Information | Encyclopedia.com: Facts, Pictures, Information!
Her study pivots on the Dutch jurist Grotius (1583-1645), who developed his rights and contract theory for the benefit of...
Travel: Dutch relics linger in Sri Lanka; The 400th anniversary of the arrival of the Dutch East Indies Company is being marked this year in Sri Lanka with a series of events throughout the island.(Features)
A Dictionary of World History Dutch East India Company A CHARTERED COMPANY established (1602) under the aegis of Prince Maurice of Nassau to coordinate the activities of companies competing for trade in the East Indies and to act as an arm of the Dutch state in its struggle against Spain.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-X-DutchEInds.html   (864 words)

  
 The Dutch East Indies Campaign 1941-1942
The area of Dutch West Timor was 5,500 square miles, Koepang being the capital and principal port, 517 miles from Darwin and 670 miles to Java.
Across the Dutch New Guinea border on the southern coast of the dragon shaped island of New Guinea at Merauke the administrative centre of Irian Jaya, a colony of a colonial possession, a few Dutch and Indonesian officials had remained.
The "Indies" was the Crown Jewel to the Japanese.
www.geocities.com /dutcheastindies   (3969 words)

  
 Dutch East India Company (Pepys' Diary)
The Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie or VOC in old-spelling Dutch, literally "United East Indian Company") was established in 1602, when the States-General of the Netherlands granted it a 21-year monopoly to carry out colonial activities in Asia.
The VOC's territories became the Dutch East Indies and were expanded over the course of the 19th century to include the whole of the Indonesian archipelago, and in the twentieth century would form Indonesia.
In 1600, the Dutch joined forces with the local Hituese (near Ambon) in an anti-Portuguese alliance, in return for which the Dutch were given the sole right to purchase spices from Hitu.
www.pepysdiary.com /p/3947.php   (5799 words)

  
 Dutch East India
The Dutch tried to establish one such monopoly on tin and early Dutch efforts in the Malay Peninsula were concentrated on securing a firm control of the tin trade on the west coast.
The Dutch adopted their traditional policy of signing treaties with the Malay tin-producing states, followed by the setting up of fortified trading posts or factories, as they were called.
For example, in 1651 the Dutch factory in Perak was destroyed by the Malays, and this was followed by a short period of hostilities, before a peace treaty was signed in 1655.
www.sabrizain.org /malaya/dutch.htm   (1145 words)

  
 Dutch Maritime Ventures
The Spanish, with whom the Dutch were at war, could not ban Dutch shipping from their ports because they were so dependent on grain brought from the Baltic by Dutch ships.
Dutch shipwrights, building plank-first, evolving the shape of the ship by eye, were able to build whatever shape they thought would serve best, whereas builders of frame-first ships were constrained by the type of shapes they could develop by unsophisticated techniques of drawing a ship's plan.
The Dutch East Indies Company (VOC) was set up to coordinate the activities of several Dutch companies competing in the Spice Trade - to provide a united opposition to the Portuguese, Spanish and English competitors.
www.duyfken.com /original/dutch.html   (337 words)

  
 Dutch Indies Campaign - Part III: Raid!
The East Indies held the world’s powers in its sway as early as the 17th century.
In 1815, the Congress of Vienna awarded the East Indies to the Kingdom of the Netherlands during its re-drawing of Europe’s post-Napoleonic political map.
Dutch naval elements joined the ABDA (American-British-Dutch-Australian) fleet, which suffered a crushing defeat in February 1942 at the Battle of the Java Sea.
www.wizards.com /default.asp?x=ah/article/ah20051216c   (972 words)

  
 Colonial Knowledge and Indigenous Power in the Dutch East Indies
The Dutch, in as much as their rhetoric emphasized indigenous rule, were in the position of privilege that allowed them to define and redefine what that role should be.
Throughout these changes, the Dutch maintained that they were simply trying to preserve the indigenous system of rule, and by the early twentieth century had, in effect, created a class of rulers who had become more extractive in their relationship toward their subjects, and at the same time demanded ever more deferential treatment from them.
Although the Dutch were keen to maintain the status of the bupati vis à vis their subjects, they forced them into the position of becoming a large cog in the colonial machine: in a sense turning them into tools of Dutch administration.
www2.hawaii.edu /~seassa/explorations/v2n1/art2/v2n1-art2.html   (4642 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Dutch East Indies
The Dutch East Indies, or Netherlands East Indies, (Dutch: Nederlands Indië) was the name of Indonesia under the administration of the Netherlands.
Sukarno proclaimed the East Indies independent in 1945, but the Netherlands successfully tried to thwart it in two wars until UN and other diplomatic pressure affected the outcome.
The Dutch retained sovereignty over Netherlands New Guinea, the west side of the island of New Guinea or West Papua until 1962, when US and UN diplomatic pressure again caused a change.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Dutch_East_Indies   (257 words)

  
 WHKMLA : History of the Dutch East Indies : World War II, 1939-1945
The royal family and the Dutch government had fled to London, where a government-in-exile was established, which was recognised by the administration in Batavia.
The Dutch residents, in total 170,000, were INTERNED, a Japanese military administration established; the Japanese partitioned the archipelago in three zones, Sumatra, the Central and the Eastern Islands; many Indonesians found employment in the new administration.
Dutch was replaced, as language of administration, education and jurisdiction, by Bahasa Indonesia and Japanese.
www.zum.de /whkmla/region/seasia/wwiidei.html   (611 words)

  
 Avalanche Press
Dutch warships first took up permanent station in the huge island chain now known as Indonesia in the early 1600s.
By the time of World War Two, Dutch practice was to patrol the archipelago with a force of cruisers and destroyers, to enforce Dutch neutrality in time of war and provide at least some deterrent to potential enemies.
In December 1941 she was under refit again, this time at Soerabaya in the East Indies, and once again she escaped with a skeleton crew.
www.avalanchepress.com /CruiserSquadron.php   (889 words)

  
 Dutch East Indies - MSN Encarta
The Dutch East Indies, or Netherlands East Indies, (Dutch : Nederlands-Indië ; Indonesian : Hindia-Belanda) was the Dutch colony that became modern Indonesia following World...
Dutch East Indies, historic name for the islands of Southeast Asia under Dutch control from the 17th century to the mid-20th century.
The majority of the islands are now part of the Republic of Indonesia, although the Dutch also controlled land now belonging to Malaysia.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761587168/Dutch_East_Indies.html   (129 words)

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