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Topic: Dutch elm disease


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Elm

In the News (Wed 24 Apr 19)

  
  Dutch Elm Disease
The fungus (Ophiostoma ulmi), the causal agent of Dutch elm disease, is probably native to Asia.
Native elm bark beetles overwinter as larvae in bark or as adults.
The Siberian elm (Ulmus pumila, sometimes incorrectly referred to as Chinese elm, and the true Chinese or lacebark elm (Ulmus parvifolia) are resistant to the disease and also are adapted to growing conditions in the state.
www.oznet.ksu.edu /dp_hfrr/extensn/problems/dtchelm.htm   (1897 words)

  
  Dutch elm disease - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Dutch elm disease is a fungal disease of elm trees which is spread by the elm bark beetle.
Dutch elm disease was first noticed in Europe in 1910, and spread slowly, reaching Britain in 1927.
The disease was first reported in the United States in 1928, with the beetles believed to have arrived in a shipment of logs from the Netherlands destined for the Ohio furniture industry.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dutch_elm_disease   (1799 words)

  
 How to Identify and Manage Dutch Elm Disease
In areas where the native elm bark beetle is the principal vector, sanitation may be augmented by applying a registered insecticide to the lower stem of healthy elms in late summer to early fall (i.e., at the first sign of autumn leaf color change) to kill adult beetles as they prepare overwintering sites.
Whenever elm branches are pruned during the growing season, pruning paint specifically formulated for use on trees should be applied to prevent attraction of elm bark beetles to the wounded trees.
Infected elms in wild areas and natural stands that are within or near urban areas often serve as a reservoir of elm bark beetles and DED fungus to infect high value landscape trees.
www.na.fs.fed.us /spfo/pubs/howtos/ht_ded/ht_ded.htm   (4542 words)

  
 Dutch Elm Disease
Dutch elm disease is caused by the fungus
Discoloration of the sapwood caused by Dutch elm disease.
Dutch elm disease control involves two different but related programs: (1) community-wide sanitation programs designed to reduce the level of elm bark beetles (principal carriers of the Dutch elm disease fungus); and (2) prevention of the spread of the disease through natural root grafts from infected trees to adjacent healthy trees.
www.ag.ndsu.edu /pubs/plantsci/trees/pp324w.htm   (4729 words)

  
 Dutch Elm Disease
Dutch elm disease is caused by the fungus
Discoloration of the sapwood caused by Dutch elm disease.
Dutch elm disease control involves two different but related programs: (1) community-wide sanitation programs designed to reduce the level of elm bark beetles (principal carriers of the Dutch elm disease fungus); and (2) prevention of the spread of the disease through natural root grafts from infected trees to adjacent healthy trees.
www.ext.nodak.edu /extpubs/plantsci/trees/pp324w.htm   (4729 words)

  
 Dutch disease - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Dutch disease is an economic concept that tries to explain the seeming relationship between the exploitation of natural resources and a decline in the manufacturing sector.
There are two basic ways to reduce the threat of Dutch disease: by slowing the appreciation of the real exchange rate and by boosting the competitiveness of the manufacturing sector.
It it rather difficult to definitively say that a country has Dutch Disease because it is difficult to prove the relationship between an increase in natural resource revenues, the real-exchange rate and a decline in the lagging sector.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dutch_disease   (1250 words)

  
 Dutch Elm Disease Literature   (Site not responding. Last check: )
No disease symptoms were observed in the area, but an apparently endemic Ophiostoma similar to the known Dutch elm disease pathogens Ophiostoma ulmi and O. novo-ulmi was isolated from around breeding galleries of scolytid beetles in the bark of Ulmus wallichiana.
Dutch elm disease incidence was 22-45% lower in the trees treated with a Pseudomonas isolate in the year of treatment and the year after.
Sufficient feeding occurred on all taxa to enable spores of the Dutch elm disease fungus (Ceratocystis ulmi) to be introduced to the twigs.
www.wcrl.ars.usda.gov /cec/insects/ded.htm   (9440 words)

  
 Dutch Elm Disease. Elm Tree. Elm Beetle. Elms   (Site not responding. Last check: )
ELM BARK BEETLES SPREAD DEDThe distribution of DED is associated with the native elm bark beetle and a smaller European elm bark beetle.
DED fungus spores are eaten by, and stick to, adult beetles as they emerge from those elms.
Diseased elms or branches should be removed promptly, within a few weeks of detection, in the growing season.
www.mdvaden.com /dutch_elm.shtml   (1662 words)

  
 Dutch elm disease Summary
Dutch elm disease is a fungal disease of elm trees which is spread by the elm bark beetle.
Dutch elm disease was first noticed in Europe in 1910, and spread slowly, reaching Britain in 1927.
The disease was first reported in the United States in 1928, with the beetles believed to have arrived in a shipment of logs from the Netherlands destined for the Ohio furniture industry.
www.bookrags.com /Dutch_elm_disease   (2117 words)

  
 Dutch Elm Disease   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dutch Elm disease -- the inexorable killer of elm trees -- is on the increase in New Hampshire and spreading rapidly in the seacoast area, it was learned by the Union yesterday in an interview with Dr. James G. Conklin, state entomologist of the N. Dept. of Agriculture, at Durham.
A real healthy elm can withstand many attacks, according to tree experts, but once weakened through defoliation by the leaf beetle or hurricane damage, it becomes easy prey to the Dutch Elm disease, which means sure death to the tree, sometimes within a matter of hours, depending on the condition of the tree.
Presence of the Dutch Elm disease in a tree is first spotted by scouting crews through a yellowing of the foliage, a failure of the tree to leave out, or a single branch not bearing foliage.
www.hampton.lib.nh.us /HAMPTON/history/storms/dutchelmdisease.htm   (549 words)

  
 Dutch elm disease
Because the bark beetles that spread the disease can survive beneath the bark of infected elm logs, felled trees containing a beetle population should not be used for fuel unless the bark has been removed.
Wilt and dieback caused by Ophistoma ulmi, the causal agent of Dutch elm disease, on a white elm.
Diseased trees should be replaced with elm hybrids that show some resistance to the disease or with nonsusceptible species.
www.glfc.cfs.nrcan.gc.ca /treedisease/dutch_elm_disease_e.html   (390 words)

  
 Dutch Elm Disease   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dutch elm disease (DED) is notorious for decimating the majestic elm trees that use to shade many city streets in the Midwest and Northeast.
The disease restricts water movement through the tree resulting in wilted and yellowing leaves, twig and branch dieback, premature defoliation, and often the death of the tree.
The DED spreads primarily by the feeding and breeding activity of elm bark beetles.
gardening.wsu.edu /library/lpro021/lpro021.htm   (527 words)

  
 Dutch Elm Disease   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dutch elm disease is a fatal vascular disease that attacks American elms.
The disease is caused by a fungus that survives the winter in infected and recently killed trees, stumps, and in recently cut brush and logs.
Application of insecticides to tree trunks to kill pupating adults is ineffective because the vector of the disease in Montana, the European elm bark beetle, pupates higher in the tree, under the bark, and insecticides to not penetrate the bark.
scarab.msu.montana.edu /extension/disea009.htm   (831 words)

  
 How to Identify and Manage Dutch Elm Disease
In areas where the native elm bark beetle is the principal vector, sanitation may be augmented by applying a registered insecticide to the lower stem of healthy elms in late summer to early fall (i.e., at the first sign of autumn leaf color change) to kill adult beetles as they prepare overwintering sites.
Whenever elm branches are pruned during the growing season, pruning paint specifically formulated for use on trees should be applied to prevent attraction of elm bark beetles to the wounded trees.
Infected elms in wild areas and natural stands that are within or near urban areas often serve as a reservoir of elm bark beetles and DED fungus to infect high value landscape trees.
na.fs.fed.us /spfo/pubs/howtos/ht_ded/ht_ded.htm   (4542 words)

  
 Dutch Elm Disease
Dutch Elm disease is a lethal fungus that grows in the water conducting vessels (Xylem) of American, Red, English and other varieties of elms.
Dutch Elm disease is persistent and remains active in a community indefinitely.
It prevents healthy elms from becoming infected by bark beetles for 2-1/2 to 3 growing seasons from a single application, and is the only product known to move into the new growth during the period of protection.
www.rainbowscivance.com /ded   (183 words)

  
 The Threat of Dutch Elm Disease
Dutch elm disease only became an epidemic in the early part of this century when the fungus responsible for the disease was somehow transported from Asia to Europe.
The disease's arrival in Europe was marked by the sudden decline and death of millions of elms in the first two decades of this century.
Further, it is illegal to prune elm trees between the dates of April 15th and July 30th as the bark beetles which play a critical role in the transmission of the disease are attracted to pruning wounds during this time.
gardenline.usask.ca /trees/elm-1.html   (1219 words)

  
 Dutch Elm Disease
Dutch elm disease was introduced to the United States from Europe in logs which contained both the fungus and the smaller European elm bark beetle.
The European elm bark beetle (Scolytus multistriatus) is the primary vector (disease carrier) in the southern portion of Minnesota, including the Twin Cities Metropolitan area, while the native elm bark beetle (Hylurgopinus rufipes) is the primary vector in the northern region of the state.
Adult elm bark beetles lay their eggs under the bark of recently dead or dying elm trees in brood galleries (tunnels in the inner bark where the eggs are laid) constructed by the female beetles.
www.ci.eagan.mn.us /live/page.asp?menu=2106   (1430 words)

  
 Dutch Elm Disease
Yet, any citizen who trimmed branches on his own elm or took down a sickly tree and hauled it to the landfill this fall would quickly have discovered that the city's fight against Dutch elm disease is a sporadic one at best.
The lab analysis of a sample taken from a dying elm tree in Wainwright, Alberta on June 225 1998 has confirmed that the Dutch elm disease fungus Ophiostoma nova-ulmi was the cause of its demise.
DED is prevalent in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Montana.
www.cps-scp.ca /pathologynews/dutchelmdisease.htm   (1372 words)

  
 Saskatchewan Dutch Elm Disease Association -- What is DED?   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dutch elm disease (DED) is a deadly fungus that can kill an elm in as little as three weeks by clogging its water-conducting vessels.
Once a tree is infected by DED it needs to be removed and disposed of properly by either burying or burning it.
Dutch elm disease is spread in Saskatchewan by the native elm bark beetle which can fly up to two kilometres as it searches for healthy elms to feed on.
www.sdeda.ca /what_is.html   (162 words)

  
 The Ramblers' Association   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dutch Elm Disease is the fungus, Ophiostoma ulmi, which is spread by the bark beetles Scolytus scolytus and Scolytus multistriatus.
It spread rapidly across southern England, and by 1977 was estimated to have killed 50% of the elms in the area.
The English Elm (Ulmus procera) was severely affected, but Wych Elms and Hybrid Elms seemed less prone to attack and survived even in Southern England into the 1990s.
www.ramblers.org.uk /elms/nhm_elmdisease.html   (236 words)

  
 Bark Beetles & Dutch Elm Disease
Dutch Elm Disease (DED) is spread from tree to tree by elm bark beetles.
The trees are most susceptible to DED in the spring because then the xylem vessels are very large and long so the disease spreads quickly; summer xylem cells are short and narrow, slowing the fungal spread and giving the tree more time to react.
I have since learned that elm bark beetles are highly attracted to the odor of fresh dead wood and that firewood is particularly susceptible to infestation; very large populations build over a period of two years in wood that is stacked and protected.
crawford.tardigrade.net /bugs/BugofMonth38.html   (1976 words)

  
 APSnet Education Center - Plant Disease Lessons - Dutch Elm Disease- Historical Significance
Dutch elm disease epidemics that resulted from movement of Ophiostoma species between and across continents vividly illustrate the dangers inherent in our movement of plant material around the world.
A Dutch scientist, Marie Beatrice Schwarz, is credited with first identifying the causal agent of what was to become known as Dutch elm disease.
Over 40 million American elm trees have been killed by this disease, and today it is still a very destructive disease of shade trees in the U.S. Many of the elm trees in North America and Europe were planted in rows along streets and walkways, or in hedgerows, or on dikes.
www.apsnet.org /education/LessonsPlantPath/DutchElm/signif.htm   (412 words)

  
 Dutch Elm Disease
Dutch Elm Disease is a vascular wilt disease causing rapid decline in as few as 6 weeks after infection.
B: Elm Bark Beetles are the vector of the Dutch Elm Disease.
Dutch Elm Disease must be treated pro-actively before the disease is present in the tree.
www.arborjet.com /problems-solutions/dutch-elm-disease.htm   (448 words)

  
 Forest Research - Dutch elm disease in Britain   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dutch elm disease is one of the most serious tree diseases in the world.
Dutch elm disease (DED) first appeared in north-west Europe around 1910, and much of the seminal work on its cause was carried out between 1919 and 1934 by several outstanding Dutch women scientists.
A competitor of the elm bark beetles, the fungus Phomopsis, is a common, rapid invader of the bark of newly dying Wych elm, thereby acting as a competitor of the elm bark beetles which normally breed in the bark.
www.forestresearch.gov.uk /website/forestresearch.nsf/ByUnique/HCOU-4U4JCL   (1507 words)

  
 Dutch Elm Disease factsheet
Dutch Elm Disease has been a devastating event in the history of tree diseases.
It is caused by the fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi and vectored by bark beetles.
The disease is referred to as "Dutch" Elm Disease because it was first described in Holland in 1921.
plantclinic.cornell.edu /FactSheets/dutchelmdisease/DED.htm   (1138 words)

  
 wcco.com - Dutch Elm Disease Lessons
According to the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, Dutch elm disease was first carried into this state in 1961.
The disease is often spread by the elm bark beetle.
Elm wood tends to be lighter almost bone-colored and when it is cut splinters like a toothpick.
wcco.com /terriblog/local_blogentry_310204535.html   (679 words)

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