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Topic: Dwarfism


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  Dwarfism web page
Dwarfism is defined by the LPA (the Little People of America) as "An adult, height of 4 ft. 10 in.
SED is a form of dwarfism that results in severe osteoarthritis of hips, multiple loose bodies in various joints, and flattened metatarsal and metacarpal heads.
Genetics tutorial- Though it does not mention dwarfism, this is a helpful page for those interested in genetics, or for those who need a little more help with their biology.
www.tjhsst.edu /~jleaf/disability/jweb/JWEB.HTM   (968 words)

  
  P.O.V. - Big Enough . What is Dwarfism? | PBS
Dwarfism is a medical or genetic condition that usually results in an adult height of four feet ten or shorter, among both men and women, although in some cases a person with a dwarfing condition may be slightly taller than that.
Proportionate dwarfism — that is, a short-stature condition that results in the arms, legs, trunk, and head being the same size in relation to each other as would be expected with an average-sized person — is often the result of a hormonal deficiency, and may be treated medically.
Achondroplastic dwarfism is characterized by an average-sized trunk, short arms and legs, and a slightly enlarged head and prominent forehead.
www.pbs.org /pov/pov2005/bigenough/special_dwarfism.html   (1091 words)

  
  Dwarfism: Encyclopedia of Children's Health
Dwarfism is a term applied broadly to a number of conditions resulting in unusually short stature.
While dwarfism is sometimes used to describe achondroplasia, a condition characterized by short stature and disproportionately short arms and legs, it is also used more broadly to refer to a variety of conditions resulting in unusually short stature in both children and adults.
The four most common causes of dwarfism in children are achondroplasia, Turner syndrome, inadequate pituitary function (pituitary dwarfism), and lack of emotional or physical nurturance.
health.enotes.com /childrens-health-encyclopedia/dwarfism   (1802 words)

  
 Dwarfism - MSN Encarta
Dwarfism, in medicine, condition of being undersized, or less than 127 cm (50 in) in height.
Cretinism, a result of a disease of the thyroid gland, is the cause of most dwarfism in Europe, Canada, and the United States.
Pituitary dwarfism is successfully treated by administering human growth hormone.
encarta.msn.com /encnet/refpages/RefArticle.aspx?refid=761554291   (137 words)

  
 Inherited Dwarfism
Dwarfism is characterized by having a full grown height of 4'10" or less.
Pituitary dwarfism, or hypopituitary dwarfism, is caused by a growth hormone deficiency.
In pituitary dwarfism there is a mutation in one of the enzymes along this pathway, leading to a deficient amount of growth hormone release.
www.udel.edu /chemo/teaching/CHEM465/SitesF02/Prop03b/dwarfism.html   (689 words)

  
 Dwarfism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The distinguishing symptom of dwarfism is abnormally and significantly shorter stature with respect to other persons in the same age cohort, and especially in adults who have reached their final heights.
Skeletal dysplasia ("dwarfism") is usually suspected because of obvious physical features (e.g., unusual configuration of face or shape of skull), because of an obviously affected parent, or because body measurements (arm span, upper to lower segment ratio) indicate disproportion.
Insular dwarfism is the reduction of size of large animals, especially mammals, when they are isolated over a small area.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dwarfism   (1829 words)

  
 Dwarfism
In general, dwarfism caused by skeletal dysplasias results in what is known as disproportionate short stature - meaning the limbs are short in comparison with the rest of the body.
Metabolic or hormonal disorders typically cause proportionate dwarfism, meaning a person's arms, legs, and trunk are all shortened but remain in proportion to overall body size.
Although types of dwarfism, and their severity and complications, vary from person to person, in general a child's life span is not affected by the dwarfism.
kidshealth.org /parent/medical/bones/dwarfism.html   (1644 words)

  
 Pituitary Dwarfism Information on Healthline
Dwarfism is a condition in which the growth of the individual is very slow or delayed, resulting in less than normal adult stature.
Thus, dwarfism can result if there is a deficiency in any of these hormones, if there is a failure in the receptor cells receiving the hormonal stimuli, or if the target cells are unable to respond.
Growth hormone deficiency is present at birth, but since the primary symptoms of pituitary dwarfism are height and growth at a reduced rate, the condition is not diagnosed until later in childhood.
www.healthline.com /galecontent/pituitary-dwarfism   (982 words)

  
 Pituitary Dwarfism in the German Shepherd Dog   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dwarfism is a condition of abnor­mally small stature, and usually is characterized by altered body propor­tions.
Although it is possible that pituitary dwarfism in the GSD is a polygenic disorder of a threshold nature, most investigators so far believe it a result of a simple autosomal (not sex-linked) re­cessive trait.
Achon­droplastic dwarfism in the Malamute, for example, is connected with a blood cell disorder, both being pleiotropic results of the same defective gene.
www.dogstuff.info /dwarfism_lanting.html   (2597 words)

  
 LPA Online   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A: Little People of America (LPA) defines dwarfism as a medical or genetic condition that usually results in an adult height of 4'10" or shorter, among both men and women, although in some cases a person with a dwarfing condition may be slightly taller than that.
Proportionate dwarfism -- that is, a short-stature condition that results in the arms, legs, trunk, and head being the same size in relation to each other as would be expected with an average-size person -- is often the result of a hormonal deficiency, and may be treated medically.
Dwarfism is a recognized condition under the Americans with Disabilities Act.
www.lpaonline.org /resources_faq.html   (2519 words)

  
 Dwarfism
Dwarfism refers to a group of conditions characterised by shorter than normal skeletal growth.
Achondroplasia is the most common type of short-limb dwarfism, occurring in around one in 25,000 children with both sexes at equal risk.
Dwarfism is a disorder characterised by shorter than normal skeletal growth that can be genetic.
www.disability.vic.gov.au /dsonline/dsarticles.nsf/pages/Dwarfism?OpenDocument   (917 words)

  
 Pituitary dwarfism
Dwarfism is a condition in which the growth of the individual is very slow or delayed.
The primary symptom of pituitary dwarfism is lack of height.
If the dwarfism is due to environmental and emotional problems, the individual may be hospitalization to monitor hormone levels.
www.healthatoz.com /healthatoz/Atoz/ency/pituitary_dwarfism.jsp   (1720 words)

  
 Dwarfism: Little People of America and Genetic Testing   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dwarfism is not all that different from other disabilities and genetic conditions in general regarding these issues.
However, the fatal form of achodroplasia dwarfism, occurs only when both parents are achondroplastic dwarfs, which is 10-15% of the time, i.e., 80% of achondroplastic babies are born to average size parents, and perhaps 5% are born to mixed parents, dwarf and average size.
Of the 10-15% of achondroplastic babies that are born to achondroplast parents, one-fourth have the fatal, homozygous condition (inheriting the dominant achondroplasia gene from both parents), which is 2-4% of all achondroplasia births.
home.earthlink.net /~dkennedy56/dwarfism_genetics.html   (2437 words)

  
 Dwarfism
In general, dwarfism caused by skeletal dysplasias results in what is known as disproportionate short stature - meaning the limbs are short in comparison with the rest of the body.
Metabolic or hormonal disorders typically cause proportionate dwarfism, meaning a person's arms, legs, and trunk are all shortened but remain in proportion to overall body size.
Although types of dwarfism, and their severity and complications, vary from person to person, in general a child's life span is not affected by the dwarfism.
www.kidshealth.org /parent/growth/growth/dwarfism.html   (1643 words)

  
 USATODAY.com - Little people reframe story of their lives   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dwarfism is a commonly used term for the more than 200 medical or genetic conditions that result in significantly below-average height.
Delano's documentary is the first film about dwarfism to be broadcast on national TV made by someone who actually knows what life under 5 feet is all about.
Although many types of dwarfism cause physical disabilities that hamper everyday activities, most people are able to live long, fulfilling lives.
www.usatoday.com /tech/science/2006-10-02-dwarfism_x.htm   (949 words)

  
 Dwarfism Introduction
Dwarfism syndromes are complex, heterogeneous, and generally rare.
In fact, dwarfism as an entity is a type of skeletal dysplasia - a term used to refer to syndromes with abnormal bone growth and development.
The term dwarf is somewhat ambiguous, but generally refers to a condition with shortening of a limb or the spine such that the pattern is recognized as a syndrome and that the affected region is generally shorter than 97 % of children of the same age.
www.stevensorenson.com /residents6/dwarfism_introduction.htm   (178 words)

  
 Dwarfism - WrongDiagnosis.com
Dwarfism is listed as a "rare disease" by the Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
This means that Dwarfism, or a subtype of Dwarfism, affects less than 200,000 people in the US population.
With a diagnosis of Dwarfism, it is also important to consider whether there is an underlying condition causing Dwarfism.
www.wrongdiagnosis.com /d/dwarfism/intro.htm   (642 words)

  
 Pituitary dwarfism Encyclopedia of Medicine - Find Articles   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Pituitary dwarfism is a condition of growth retardation in which patients are very short, but have normal body proportions.
Pituitary dwarfism is caused by a dysfunction of the pituitary gland.
In both types of pituitary dwarfism, height is stunted, but so is growth in the rest of the body, resulting in a perfectly proportioned little person.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_g2601/is_0010/ai_2601001064   (972 words)

  
 Genetic mechanisms in equine dwarfism - dwarf horse genes
Dwarfism is considered rare in large horses and considered fare more common in USA miniature horses, especially among those who breed horses with known dwarf ancestors.
The link between genetics and miniature horse dwarfism is not surprising, given that the hallmark of dwarfism is a small size.
In England, many of the smaller Dartmoor Ponies are well-within the height requirements of the USA Miniature Horse Registries, yet dwarfism is virtually unknown in the breed.
www.mini-horse.org /dwarf_horse_genes.html   (1329 words)

  
 Dwarfism (Hypopituitarism)
Dwarfism develops in young dogs from a deficiency of growth hormone (GH), which is normally secreted by the pituitary gland.
Dwarfism is sometimes a component of hypopituitarism, in which one or more of the pituitary hormones are not produced in normal amounts.
There is no known preventative of pituitary dwarfism, but if a puppy is diagnosed with the inherited form of the disease, neither the sire nor dam (father or mother) should be used for breeding again.
www.petplace.com /dogs/dwarfism-hypopituitarism/page1.aspx   (729 words)

  
 Dwarfism
Because dwarfism is relatively rare, not many worry about unprejudiced treatment of dwarfs.But dwarfs deal with the same issues as “normal” people, while also trying to overcome the problems posed by their abnormally small height.
All the websites concerning dwarfism had one common theme:dwarfs are normal.It was also common to find on these websites that there are names that dwarfs respect and those that they find derogatory.
Dwarfism is a condition found in both genders where, according to the website Little People of America, the average adult height is approximately of four feet.
www.meredith.edu /stones/dwarfism.htm   (568 words)

  
 LABRADOR NET - Dwarfism in Labradors
The gene acts as an autosomal recessive in regards to dwarfism, but acts as though it were dominant when only one parent passes on the gene to its offspring.
This implies that 1) any Labrador with any type of RD is a carrier for dwarfism, and 2) at least one of the two parents of puppies with RD is a carrier for dwarfism.
Homozygous dogs are all reported to have abnormal skeletons - dwarfism in the sense of front shoulders lower than rear - a sort of 'bulldog' appearance.
www.labradornet.com /dwarfism.html   (1777 words)

  
 MedlinePlus: Dwarfism
The primary NIH organization for research on Dwarfism is the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
A single type, called achondroplasia, causes about 70 percent of all dwarfism.
However, there is a greater risk of some health problems With proper medical care, most people with dwarfism have active lives and live as long as other people.
www.nlm.nih.gov /medlineplus/dwarfism.html   (201 words)

  
 Dwarfism - What is it?
Dwarfism is the result of the disproportionate growth of the skeleton.
Dwarfism is a general term covering a large number of medical conditions which result in short stature.
We refer to persons affected with dwarfism as "Little People", and the condition is often referred to as "short stature".
www.lprf.org /dwarfism.html   (623 words)

  
 ACC: Dogs Needed for Dwarfism Study
A study into chondrodysplasia (dwarfism) in Chesapeake Bay Retrievers is underway at the University of California at Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.
It also appears that the dwarfism is due to an autosomal recessive gene and that multigenic factors may be involved.
This description is very useful for veterinarians who may wish to do radiographic workups on dwarfism in Chesapeakes or other breeds prone to this form of dwarfism.
www.amchessieclub.org /dwarfism.html   (472 words)

  
 Dwarfism :: Congenital Anomalies : RSS Feeds : Video : Gourt
Dwarfism is now rarely used as a medical term and is sometimes considered impolite or pejorative.
Of the hundreds of causes of dwarfism in humans, most are genetic, and most involve single gene variations that affect the structure or metabolism of bone, cartilage, or connective tissue.
For instance, insular dwarfism is the dwarfism of species due to isolated environment and it helps to reduce the need for food.
www.gourt.com /Health/Conditions-and-Diseases/Musculoskeletal-Disorders/Congenital-Anomalies/Dwarfism.html   (831 words)

  
 A Small Problem Dwarfism in Dogs
There are miniature and toy versions of “standard”-size breeds, but this is not the same as dwarfism, the latter being the result of an abnormality rather than a variation within normal limits in genes.
Proportional dwarfism in the GSD is called “pituitary dwarfism” because an old name for the hypophysis, or part of it, is “pituitary gland”.
To even attempt to delve into the mysteries of inheritance of various forms of dwarfism, one must be prepared to consider different genetic causes and expressions in what, on first glance, is easy to assume are the same conditions.
www.dogstuff.info /dwarfism_part_three_lanting.html   (1527 words)

  
 Canine & Equine Dwarf - Dog & Horse dwarfism
Understand the parallels between equine and canine dwarfism will help you understand the issues involved with the health are breeding of miniature horses.
The dwarf horse has far more observable anomalies than the achondroplastic dwarf, and this type of dwarfism is far more disabling, primarily because of the severe leg deformities and nasal constriction.
The factorial interaction of the 36 genes contributing to equine dwarfism creates thousands of variations on brachiocephalic dwarfism, ranging from a minimal dwarf with sound legs and a short neck, to a grossly-deformed “monster” with nostrils immediately under their eyes.
www.mini-horse.org /dwarf_dog_horse.html   (742 words)

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