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Topic: Dysentery


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  dysentery. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-07
It is estimated that in some parts of the tropics 80% of the children acquire bacillary dysentery before the age of five; the mortality rate is high among infants and the aged if the infection is not treated, preferably with a broad-spectrum antibiotic.
Amebic dysentery is prevalent in regions where human excrement is used as fertilizer; in some such regions over half the population probably harbors the amebic cyst.
A combination of drugs is generally used to treat amebic dysentery: an amebicide (metronidazole or tinidazole) to eliminate the organism from the intestinal tract, an antibiotic to eradicate associated bacterial infection, and a drug to combat infection of the liver and other tissues.
www.bartleby.com /65/dy/dysenter.html   (559 words)

  
  Water-Borne Diseases: Cholera and Dysentery—Epidemic Dysentery   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dysentery is an inflammation of the intestine characterized by the frequent passage of feces with blood and mucus.
Dysentery caused by the amoeba is milder than its bacterial cousin, although it is quite difficult to treat and cure and often becomes chronic.
Amoebic dysentery may occur in a chronic form when the amoebas invade blood vessels of the intestine and are carried to other parts of the body, causing amoebic abscesses of the liver and brain.
www.factmonster.com /cig/dangerous-diseases-epidemics/epidemic-dysentery.html   (1016 words)

  
  Dysentery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Dysentery is an illness (formerly known as the bloody flux or simply flux) involving severe diarrhea that is often associated with blood in the feces.
Amoebic dysentery is transmitted by contaminated water, and is well known as a "travelers dysentery" because of its prevalence in developing nations, or "Montezuma's Revenge" (particularly in Mexico), although it is occasionally seen in industrialized countries.
The main symptom of epidemic dysentery is bloody diarrhea.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dysentery   (540 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Dysentery
Dysentery is an illness involving severe diarrhea that is often associated with blood in the feces.
Dysentery was the cause of death of Henry V, King of England.
A combination of drugs is generally used to treat amebic dysentery: an amebicide (metronidazole or tinidazole) to eliminate the organism from the intestinal tract, an antibiotic to eradicate associated bacterial infection, and a drug to combat infection of the liver and other tissues.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Dysentery   (1799 words)

  
 dysentery - HighBeam Encyclopedia
DYSENTERY [dysentery], inflammation of the intestine characterized by the frequent passage of feces, usually with blood and mucus.
It is estimated that in some parts of the tropics 80% of the children acquire bacillary dysentery before the age of five; the mortality rate is high among infants and the aged if the infection is not treated, preferably with a broad-spectrum antibiotic.
Amebic dysentery is prevalent in regions where human excrement is used as fertilizer; in some such regions over half the population probably harbors the amebic cyst.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/d1/dysenter.asp   (656 words)

  
 Dysentery   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dysentery is a severe diarrhea l illness often associated with blood in the feces.
Amoebic dysentery is transmitted by contaminated water, and is well known as a "travellers dysentery", although it is occasionally seen in Western countries.
Dysentery Disease involving the inflammation of the lining of the large intestines.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Dysentery.html   (292 words)

  
 BBC - Health - Conditions - Dysentery
Dysentery is a highly contagious bacterial infection, which is spread by poor hygiene.
Dysentery is an infection of the gut caused by a bacterium called shigella.
Dysentery is usually spread by hand-to-mouth transfer from person-to-person or from surfaces that have been contaminated by an infected person.
www.bbc.co.uk /health/conditions/dysentery1.shtml   (318 words)

  
 Dysentery - LoveToKnow 1911   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Although at one time a common disease in Great Britain, dysentery is now very rarely met with there, and is for the most part confined to warm countries, where it is the cause of a large amount of mortality.
Clinically, dysentery manifests itself with varying degrees of intensity, and it is often impossible without microscopical examination to determine between the amoebic and bacillary forms.
The dysentery poison appears to exert its effects upon the glandular structures of the large intestine, particularly in its lower part.
90.1911encyclopedia.org /D/DY/DYSENTERY.htm   (1303 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | Health | Medical notes | Dysentery
Dysentery is general term for a group of diseases which trigger inflammation of the lining of the large intestines, leading to stomach pains, and diarrhoea, and possibly vomiting and fever.
The diarrhoea associated with dysentery means that people suffering from the condition are likely to lose a large amount of important salts and fluids from the body.
Dysentery often poses a major threat in crowded areas with inadequate sanitation, poor hygiene and limited supplies of safe water.
news.bbc.co.uk /1/hi/health/medical_notes/4134539.stm   (532 words)

  
 Epidemic dysentery - Diarrhea, Diarrhoea - Dialogue on Diarrhoea Online - Prevention, Control, Management and Treatment ...
The cause of epidemic dysentery during the lost half of this century has always been Shigella dysenteriae type 1 (Sd1) with one possible exception - an outbreak of epidemic dysentery in Swaziland in 1992 where E. coli O157 was reported as the cause; however Sd1 and Vibrio cholerae were also present in the population.
The role of the laboratory during an epidemic of dysentery is two-fold: to confirm the diagnosis and to establish which drugs the organism responds to.
The experience gained during the course of one epidemic of dysentery should be used to strengthen the capacity of national diarrhoeal disease programmes to deal with all forms of diarrhoea.
www.rehydrate.org /dd/su55.htm   (4044 words)

  
 Dysentery | Principal Health News
Dysentery is not a disease but a symptom of a potentially deadly illness.
Dysentery is the body's response to an unwanted visitor in the digestive system.
While cases of amebic dysentery tend to be isolated and sporadic, epidemics of bacillary dysentery can sweep through entire villages, cities, or regions.
www.principalhealthnews.com /topic/dysentery   (787 words)

  
 dysentery   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Water-Borne Diseases: Cholera and Dysentery—Epidemic Dysentery - Water-Borne Diseases: Cholera and Dysentery Epidemic Dysentery Water-Borne Diseases: Cholera and...
Water-Borne Diseases: Cholera and Dysentery—Introduction - Water-Borne Diseases: Cholera and Dysentery Introduction Water-Borne Diseases: Cholera and...
Water-Borne Diseases: Cholera and Dysentery—Cholera: Scourge of the Poor - Water-Borne Diseases: Cholera and Dysentery Cholera: Scourge of the Poor Water-Borne Diseases:...
www.infoplease.com /ce6/sci/A0816516.html   (235 words)

  
 Dysentery - healing with herbs, vitamins and minerals.
An inflammation in the region of the colon is the cause of the diarrhea typical during dysentery, the inflammation is in turn caused by an infection in the colon due to pathogens including bacteria, many types of internal parasites and some viruses.
Where the bacteria has been responsible for causing the dysentery, it is usually because insects like flies have transferred the bacteria from exposed and infected feces to food stuffs in many regions and countries and especially in those where community hygiene standards are rather poor.
Amebic dysentery is dissimilar to dysentery caused by infection from shigella, in that it mostly occurs in places or countries with hot climates.
www.herbs2000.com /disorders/dysentery.htm   (1139 words)

  
 Bolivia Information: Amebiasis, Amoeba, Dysentery
Dysentery, acute or chronic disease of the large intestine of humans, characterized by frequent passage of small, watery stools, often containing blood and mucus, accompanied by severe abdominal cramps.
Amoebic dysentery, caused by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica, is endemic in many tropical countries, but is attributable more to unsanitary conditions than to heat.
It is the most common type of dysentery in the Philippine Islands, the Malay Archipelago, and the West Indies, but it also occurs in almost all temperate countries.
www.redfish.to /bolivia/amoebas/amoebas.html   (562 words)

  
 * Dysentery - (Disease): Definition   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Dysentery is an infection of the gut caused by a bacterium called Shigella.
Dysentery is highly infectious and is usually spread by hand-to-mouth transfer from person-to-person or from surfaces or articles that have been contaminated by an infected...
Be sure to tell your doctor if you may be at risk for dysentery, or diarrhea containing blood, which is often caused by exposure to water contaminated by bacteria or protozoa.
en.mimi.hu /disease/dysentery.html   (285 words)

  
 Natural, Herbal Home Remedies for Dysentery Treatment and cure
Dysentery is a disease of the intestines attended with frequent bloody and mucous stools.
The chief reason for dysentery is an inflammation in the lower part of ileum and the large intestine.
- Amoebic Dysentery: It is caused by the germ Entamoeba Histolytia.
www.online-vitamins-guide.com /dietary-cure/dysentery.htm   (528 words)

  
 natural, Herbal Home Remedies For Dysentery
However, amoebic dysentery (which is caused by amoeba living in the raw green vegetables of some countries) and viral dysentery are more severe forms of dysentery.
All types of dysentery should be treated by a health professional.
To help prevent bacterial dysentery, two weeks before you travel to a foreign country,eat a finely chopped raw onion in a cup of yogurt every day.
www.herbal-home-remedies.org /remedies/dysentery.htm   (267 words)

  
 Dysentery - LoveToKnow 1911
In the milder forms of the disease there is simply a congested or inflamed condition of the mucous membrane, with perhaps some inflammatory exudation on its surface, which is passed off by the discharges from the bowels.
They may be applied externally as fomentations, for the relief of tormina; by rectal injection for the relief of the tenesmus and irritability of the bowel; hypodermically in advanced cases, for the relief of the general distress.
(1907), "Dysentery," Drs Andrew Davidson and Simon Flexner; Davidson, Hygiene and Diseases of Warm Climates (Edinburgh, 1903); Fearnside in Ind.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Dysentery   (1303 words)

  
 Imperial College London - Dysentery uses ‘sword and shield’ approach to cause infection
Dysentery uses ‘sword and shield’ approach to cause infection
They found that shigella was able to infect cells by using a secretion system to inject proteins into human cells, (the sword), while lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the surface of the bacteria acts as a shield to protect the dysentery bacterium from being destroyed by the bodys immune system.
In this case, the dysentery bacteria has evolved into a highly effective and dangerous infection.
www.ic.ac.uk /p6117.htm   (474 words)

  
 dysentery - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about dysentery
Infection of the large intestine causing abdominal cramps and painful diarrhoea with blood.
There are two kinds of dysentery: amoebic (caused by a protozoan), common in the tropics, which may lead to liver damage; and bacterial, the kind most often seen in the temperate zones.
For that most dreaded of Solomon Island scourges, dysentery, had struck Berande plantation, and he was all alone to cope with it.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /dysentery   (201 words)

  
 MyFox Houston | Dysentery - Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Diagnosis
Dysentery is defined as diarrhea in which there is blood and pus.
Poor hygiene and sanitation increase the risk of dysentery by spreading the protozoa or bacteria that cause it through food or water contaminated by infected human feces.
Dysentery is rarely caused by chemical irritants or by intestinal worms.
health.myfoxhouston.com /conditionfactsheet.aspx?id=156   (700 words)

  
 Fighting Disease: Disease List--EPIDEMIC DYSENTERY
Dysentery may simply be defined as diarrhea containing blood.
In Africa, epidemic dysentery due to Sd1 appeared in eastern Zaire in 1979 and has subsequently been confirmed in Angola, Burundi, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Sao Tom‚ and Principe, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
During an epidemic, all dysentery patients should receive an antibiotic to which Sd1 from local cases has been shown to be sensitive.
www.un.org /Pubs/CyberSchoolBus/special/health/disease/dysentry.htm   (378 words)

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