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Topic: E (mathematical constant)


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  The Constant e
"e" is a numerical constant that is equal to 2.71828.
The value of "e" is found in many mathematical formulas such as those describing a nonlinear increase or decrease such as growth or decay (including compound interest), the statistical "bell curve," the shape of a hanging cable or a standing arch.
The number e was first studied by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in the 1720s, although its existence was more or less implied in the work of John Napier, the inventor of logarithms, in 1614.
www.ndt-ed.org /EducationResources/Math/Math-e.htm   (338 words)

  
  e - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com
Digraphs starting with E are common in many languages to indicate diphthongs or show a different value of E, such as EA or EE for // or // in English, EI for // in English or // in German, or EU for // in English or // in German.
E is very often silent in English, particularly at the ends of words where old noun inflections have been dropped, although even when silent at the end of a word it often causes vowels in the word to be pronounced as long (compare rat and rate).
E is often used as a digit meaning fourteen in hexadecimal and other positional numeral systems with a radix of 15 or greater.
www.onpedia.com /encyclopedia/e   (771 words)

  
 E
The fifth letter of the Roman alphabet, E is derived from the Greek letter epsilon which is much the same in appearance and function.
In mathematics, e is a transcendental number (approximately equal to 2.71828182846) which is used as the base for natural logarithms.
In mathematics, ∃ (a backwards E) is a symbol for "there exists...", called the existential quantifier.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ea/E.html   (273 words)

  
 E (mathematical constant) Summary
In 1873, Charles Hermite proved that e is transcendental, that is, that e is not the root of a polynomial equation with integer coefficients.
The first references to the constant were published in 1618 in the table of an appendix of a work on logarithms by John Napier.
The first known use of the constant, represented by the letter b, was in correspondence from Gottfried Leibniz to Christiaan Huygens in 1690 and 1691.
www.bookrags.com /E_(mathematical_constant)   (1600 words)

  
 E (mathematical constant)
(e is not to be confused with γ – the Euler–Mascheroni constant, sometimes called simply Euler's constant.) The number e is one of the most important numbers in mathematics, alongside the additive and multiplicative identities 0 and 1, the imaginary unit i, and π, the circumference to diameter ratio for any circle in a plane.
e is irrational, and furthermore is transcendental (Lindemann–Weierstrass theorem).
Brothers and J. Knox, New closed-form approximations to the Logarithmic Constant e.
en.explicatus.org /wiki/E_(mathematical_constant)   (1186 words)

  
 E FACTS AND INFORMATION
E is very often silent in English (silent E), particularly at the ends of words where old noun inflections have been dropped, although even when silent at the end of a word it often causes vowels in the word to be pronounced as long (compare ''rat'' and ''rate'').
E is often a mis-understood letter in the English language, silent in many cases, badly portraited in upper cases and exchanged with Y by many unschooled and illiterate.
In education, E is a very low grade, except in some grading systems such as the one used in the USA which goes from D to F, omitting E. In electrochemistry, E is a symbol for electrode potential, and is a symbol for standard electrode potential.
www.phera.com /E   (964 words)

  
 SingaporeMoms - Parenting Encyclopedia - E
E is derived from the Greek letter epsilon which is much the same in appearance (Ε, ε) and function.
E is very often silent in English, particularly at the ends of words where old noun inflections have been dropped, although even when silent at the end of a word it often causes vowels in the word to be pronounced as long (compare rat and rate).
E is the pseudonym of Mark Oliver Everett, lead singer of The Eels.
www.singaporemoms.com /parenting/E   (765 words)

  
 E (mathematical constant)
(occasionally called Euler's number or Napier's constant in honor of the Scottish mathematician John Napier who introduced logarithms) is the base of the natural logarithm.
The number e is known to be irrational and even transcendental.
It was the first number to be proved transcendental without having been specifically constructed; the proof was given by Charles Hermite in 1873.
www.teachersparadise.com /ency/en/wikipedia/e/e_/e__mathematical_constant_.html   (225 words)

  
 math lessons - E (mathematical constant)
The mathematical constant e (occasionally called Euler's number after the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler, or Napier's constant in honor of the Scottish mathematician John Napier who introduced logarithms) is the base of the natural logarithm function.
Alongside the number π and the imaginary unit i, e is one of the most important mathematical constants.
The exact reasons for the use of e are unknown, but it may be because the letter e is the first letter of the word exponential.
www.mathdaily.com /lessons/E_(mathematical_constant)   (642 words)

  
 Introduction to the Fundamental Physical Constants
The velocity of light (c) and Planck's constant (h) are examples of quantities that occur naturally in the mathematical formulation of certain fundamental physical theories, the former in James Clerk Maxwell's theory of electric and magnetic fields and Albert Einstein's theories of relativity, and the latter in the theory of atomic particles, or quantum theory.
In this equation, E and m are variables and c is invariant, a constant of the equation.
For example, the fine-structure constant is the fundamental constant of quantum electrodynamics, the quantum theory of the interaction (mutual influence) among electrons, muons, and photons.
www.physics.nist.gov /cuu/Constants/introduction.html   (1216 words)

  
 Mathematical Markup Language (MathML) Version 2.0 (Second Edition)
MathML is an XML application for describing mathematical notation and capturing both its structure and content.
The goal of MathML is to enable mathematics to be served, received, and processed on the World Wide Web, just as HTML has enabled this functionality for text.
The material in Appendices D, E, G and L was not present in MathML 1.01.
www.w3.org /TR/MathML2   (1037 words)

  
 » Mathematical Constant E
This server is a database of more than 215,000,000 mathematical constants like Pi, E, Catalan or Euler-Mascheroni constant with more than 2...
Euler (1707-1783) introduced e for this constant in a manuscript, Meditatio in Experimenta explosione tormentorum...
When Google IPO'd a year ago, it initially sought to raise $2,718,281,828, which is the first ten digits of the mathematical constant e.
physicalconstant.info /info/Mathematical-Constant-E   (170 words)

  
 [E (mathematical constant)] | [All the best E (mathematical constant) resources at karaoke.velocityincome.com]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
e is the unique number such that the value of the derivative (slope of a tangent line) of f (x)=ex (blue curve) at the point x=0 is exactly 1.
(e is not to be confused with γ – the Euler-Mascheroni constant, sometimes called simply Euler's constant.) The number e is one of the most important numbers in mathematics, alongside the additive and multiplicative identities 0 and 1, the imaginary unit i, and π, the circumference to diameter ratio for any circle.
e is irrational, and furthermore is transcendental (Lindemann-Weierstrass theorem).
karaoke.velocityincome.com /E_(mathematical_constant)   (1835 words)

  
 E
The fifth letter of the Roman alphabet, E is derived from the Greek letter epsilon which is much the same in appearance and function.
In mathematics, e is a transcendental number (approximately equal to 2.71828182846) which is used as the base for natural logarithms.
In mathematics, ∃ (a backwards E) is a symbol for "there exists...", called the existential quantifier.
www.wordlookup.net /ea/e.html   (395 words)

  
 Math Forum - Ask Dr. Math   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Certainly more people have heard of Pi; there is mention of it in the Old Testament of the Bible, and e didn't come about until long after that (logarithms were invented in the 16th and 17th centuries, and it probably took a little while until people noticed that e was a nice base).
Anyway, e and Pi are both numbers that will pop out of your problems when you least expect it, and I'd say that they do it with about the same frequency.
I guess e and Pi are kind of the Burger King and McDonalds of the math world, and the golden ratio is like a Hardee's or something.
mathforum.org /dr.math/problems/e_and_pi_2.html   (942 words)

  
 Mathematical Constants
This is the most well known mathematical constant, and is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter - the fact that this is the same for all circles is amazing in itself.
Not many transcendental numbers are known (e and Liouville's number are another two examples) but in fact in 1874 Cantor showed that almost all real numbers are transcendental.
is known as Euler's or Mascheroni's constant and is approximately 0.577 215 664 901...
www.mayer.dial.pipex.com /maths/constant.htm   (2115 words)

  
 Mathematical Quotations -- D
Thus metaphysics and mathematics are, among all the sciences that belong to reason, those in which imagination has the greatest role.
But mathematics would hold the unique position of being the only branch of theology possessing a rigorous demonstration of the fact that it should be so classified.
For a physicist mathematics is not just a tool by means of which phenomena can be calculated, it is the main source of concepts and principles by means of which new theories can be created.
math.furman.edu /~mwoodard/ascquotd.html   (1962 words)

  
 E (mathematical constant) - Gurupedia
The first indication of e as a constant was discovered by Jacob Bernoulli, trying to find the limit of the following equation.
While in the subsequent years some researchers used the letter c, the use of e was more common and is used nowadays as the standard symbol for the constant.
Yet, e is also said to have been used both from the ancient Greeks and Egyptians, in the construction of Parthenon and the Great Pyramid, where it is encoded.
www.gurupedia.com /e/e_/e_(mathematical_constant).htm   (608 words)

  
 PHP: Class Constants - Manual
The value must be a constant expression, not (for example) a variable, a class member, result of a mathematical operation or a function call.
By keeping the constant definition class seperate from the rest of your classes (if you are calling this from a class), you minimize the possibility of accidental variable assignment.
If you can define a global constant based on the return of a function, please explain why you do not see it justifiable that a class constant should be able to be assigned in the same manner.
www.php.net /manual/en/language.oop5.constants.php   (1336 words)

  
 6.1 math -- Mathematical functions
It provides access to the mathematical functions defined by the C standard.
The distinction between functions which support complex numbers and those which don't is made since most users do not want to learn quite as much mathematics as required to understand complex numbers.
Receiving an exception instead of a complex result allows earlier detection of the unexpected complex number used as a parameter, so that the programmer can determine how and why it was generated in the first place.
www.python.org /doc/current/lib/module-math.html   (449 words)

  
 6.2 cmath -- Mathematical functions for complex numbers
6.2 cmath -- Mathematical functions for complex numbers
It provides access to mathematical functions for complex numbers.
Release 2.5, documentation updated on 19th September, 2006.
www.python.org /doc/lib/module-cmath.html   (389 words)

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