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Topic: The Earl of Shrewsbury


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In the News (Fri 19 Jul 19)

  
  Earl of Shrewsbury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Earl of Shrewsbury is the senior Earl on the Roll in the Peerage of England (the more senior Earldom of Arundel being held by the Duke of Norfolk).
The 1st Earl of Shrewsbury was created Earl of Waterford, in the Peerage of Ireland, and Hereditary Lord High Steward of Ireland, in 1446, and the two earldoms have been united since.
The seat of the Earls of Shrewsbury was once Alton Towers until it was sold to The Tussauds Group.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Earl_of_Shrewsbury   (391 words)

  
 SHREWSBURY - LoveToKnow Article on SHREWSBURY   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
SHREWSBURY, ELIZABETH TALBOT, COUNTESS OF (1518-1608), better known by her nickname " Bess of Hardwick," was the daughter and co-heiress of John Hardwicke of Hardwicke in Derbyshire.
Shrewsbury is a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of Lichfield, and the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop.
Shrewsbury (Pengwerne, Scrobsbyryg, Salopesberie), then known as Pengwerne or Pengwym, was the capital of the kings of Powis during the 5th and 6th centuries, but was taken in 779 by Offa king of Mercia, who changed its name to Shrewsbury (Scrobsbyryg)..
www.1911encyclopedia.org /S/SH/SHREWSBURY.htm   (3379 words)

  
 George Talbot, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
George Talbot, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury (1528–18 November 1590) was an English statesman during the 16th century.
Meanwhile, in 1571, Lord Shrewsbury was appointed Lord High Steward (the premier Great Office of State) for the trial of Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk (regarding the Ridolfi plot).
Finally, in 1572, Lord Shrewsbury was appointed Earl Marshal, a position that he held (along with the aforementioned position of Justice in Eyre) until his death in 1590.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/George_Talbot,_6th_Earl_of_Shrewsbury   (271 words)

  
 EARLS OF SHREWSBURY - LoveToKnow Article on EARLS OF SHREWSBURY   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The earldom of Shrewsbury, one of the most ancient in the English peerage, dates from the time of William the Conqueror.
In 1071 the greater part of the county of Shropshire was granted to him, carrying with it the title of earl of Shropshire, though, from his principal residence at the castle of Shrewsbury, he' like his successors was generally styled earl of Shrewsbury.
He was the founder of Shrewsbury Abbey in 1083.
44.1911encyclopedia.org /S/SH/SHREWSBURY_EARLS_OF.htm   (198 words)

  
 Francis TALBOT (5º E. Shrewsbury)
The involvement of Francis Talbot, fifth Earl of Shrewsbury, in national political life in the reign of Henry VIII was limited.
Shrewsbury both advocated and prepared for the Parliament of Mar 1553, and his involvement in the succession conspiracy was reluctant enough for him to make his peace with Mary and continue to wield his patronage during her reign.
Shrewsbury did not agree with with the religious settlement of 1559, on Elizabeth's accesion, but again his loyalty to the crown was overcoming any religious scruples.
www.tudorplace.com.ar /Bios/FrancisTalbot(5EShrewsbury).htm   (367 words)

  
 Georgetown: The Earl of Shrewsbury Papers
Shrewsbury and Waterford is the premier Earldom in the United Kingdom, dating to 1442 when the celebrated warrior John Talbot was created the first Earl of Shrewsbury.
The 17th Earl, Bertram Arthur Talbot (1832 - 1856), died unmarried as a young man. The 17th Earl believed himself to be the last descendant in the male line of the first Earl and consequently had willed his extensive property to a son of the Duke of Norfolk.
In addition, in 1877 a suit was brought by Praed and Co. against Anna Theresa, Countess Shrewsbury, widow of the 19th Earl, for the administration of the estate of her husband.
gulib.lausun.georgetown.edu /dept/speccoll/shrews.htm   (3576 words)

  
 George TALBOT (6° E. Shrewsbury)
Shrewsbury was preoccupied as he was with the problem of Mary Stuart, now confined a close prisoner in the Turret House of Sheffield Castle.
Shrewsbury was well aware that, despite his vigilance, Mary was in contact with the French Ambassador and that that gentleman would soonhear the Queen of Scots' compaints of neglect.
Shrewsbury himself had come to the Court at Oatlands accompanied by his retainers, 'only myself excepted'; he had behaved discreetly in the matter of the charges of treason and had been graciously used by the Queen, but had utterly refused to be reconciled to his wife.
www.tudorplace.com.ar /Bios/GeorgeTalbot(6EShrewsbury).htm   (1772 words)

  
 Earl of Shrewsbury   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The Earl of Shrewsbury is the senior Earl in the Peerage of England.
Roger of Montgomery, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury (d.
Robert of Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury (1052-1113)
www.1-free-software.com /en/wikipedia/e/ea/earl_of_shrewsbury.html   (315 words)

  
 Definition of Earl
An official defining characteristic of an earl consisted of the receipt of the "third penny" of the revenues of justice of a shire.
Thus we find the "earl of Shrewsbury" (Shropshire), "earl of Arundel" or "earl of Chichester" (Sussex), "earl of Winchester" (Hampshire), etc. In a few cases the earl was traditionally addressed by his family name, e.g.
The eldest son of an Earl generally bears the courtesy title of Viscount or Lord; one refers to a younger son of an earl as the Honourable [Forename] [Surname] and to a daughter as Lady [Forename] [Surname] (Lady Diana Spencer furnishing a well-known example).
www.wordiq.com /definition/Earl   (717 words)

  
 Roger de Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Afterwards he was entrusted with land in two places critical for the defense of England, receiving the Rape of Arundel at the end of 1067 (or in early 1068), and in November 1071 he was created Earl of Shrewsbury.
Roger was thus one of the half a dozen greatest magnates in England during William the Conqueror's reign.
In addition to the large part of Sussex included in the Rape of Arundel, and seven-eights of Shropshire which were associated with the earldom of Shrewsbury, he had estates in Surrey, Hampshire, Wiltshire, Middlesex, Hertfordshire, Gloucestershire, Worcestershire, Cambridgeshire, Warwickshire and Staffordshire.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Roger_de_Montgomery   (430 words)

  
 Georgetown: The Earl of Shrewsbury Papers
The Earl of Shrewsbury Papers, which concern the estate of Henry John Chetwynd-Talbot (1803 - 1868), the 18th Earl of Shrewsbury and Waterford, and 3rd Earl Talbot of Hensol, consists of 3.0 linear feet of material, including correspondence, documents, deeds, accounts, drawings and related printed material.
The 3rd Earl Talbot's claim to the Earldom of Shrewsbury and to the Earldom of Waterford was allowed by the Committee for Priveleges in 1858, and consequently Henry John Chetwynd-Talbot became the 18th Earl of Shrewsbury.
ALS from the 19th Earl of Shrewsbury to Henry Smith.
www.library.georgetown.edu /dept/speccoll/shrews.htm   (3576 words)

  
 Nottinghamshire: history and archaeology | Worksop, The Dukery and Sherwood Forest: The Ancient Lords of Worksop, ...
At the latter end of this year, 1530, the Earl of Northumberland, Shrewsbury's son-in-law, was sent to arrest the Cardinal, at Cawood, and deliver him into the custody of the Earl of Shrewsbury.
This Earl of Shrewsbury died July 26th, 1531, at Win-field Manor, and was buried at Sheffield.
The Howards.—On the death of Edward, the eighth Earl of Shrewsbury, in 1617, the title, it is seen, went to a distant relative; while the principal part of the property, including the ancient Baronies, descended to three surviving daughters of Gilbert, the seventh Earl.
www.nottshistory.org.uk /white1875/lords2.htm   (772 words)

  
 Maximilian Genealogy Master Database 2000 - pafn498 - Generated by Personal Ancestral File
Shrewsbury, which was also revived when the 19th Earl died in 1877.
In addition, in 1877 a suit was brought by Praed & Co. against Anna Theresa, Countess Shrewsbury, widow of the 19th Earl, for the administration of the estate of her husband.
Talbot was brought in the same year by the 20th Earl Shrewsbury against his uncles and Henry Smith.
www.peterwestern.f9.co.uk /maximilia/pafn498.htm   (1751 words)

  
 Church of England
The Library holds the papers of the earls of Shrewsbury from the 15th century to the death of Gilbert Talbot, 7th earl, in 1616.
Shrewsbury is of the opinion that Mary should not be moved, for fear of attempts at rescue.
The Earl of Shrewsbury to Sir Francis Walsingham, 27 and 31 August 1574.
www.lambethpalacelibrary.org /holdings/guides/mary-mss.html   (1342 words)

  
 Nottinghamshire: history and archaeology | The Scenery of Sherwood Forest: Welbeck (2)
Being educated along with the sons of the Earl of Shrewsbury, he became the friend and almost inseparable companion of Gilbert Talbot, who succeeded to the earldom; with him he travelled abroad.
On James the First's progress through England when he succeeded to the crown we find the Earl of Shrewsbury sending invitations to his neighbours and friends in various parts of the country to meet the King at Worksop Manor, where a noble entertainment was prepared for him.
Sir Charles Cavendish died at Welbeck in 1617, and was buried in the Cavendish Chapel attached to the church at Bolsover.
www.nottshistory.org.uk /rodgers1908/welbeck2.htm   (1580 words)

  
 Church of England
Francis, 5th earl, was president of the Council of the North, and Gilbert, 6th earl, was custodian of Mary Queen of Scots.
Robert Swift to the Earl of Shrewsbury from London, 12 February 1554, written in the aftermath of Wyatt’s rebellion.
The Lords of the Council to the Marquess of Winchester, the Earl of Shrewsbury and the Earl of Derby from Hatfield, 21 November 1558.
www.lambethpalacelibrary.org /holdings/guides/elizabeth-mss.html   (1420 words)

  
 John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury (1384/90-17 July 1453) was an important English military commander during the Hundred Years War.
Then for five years from February 1414 he was lieutenant of Ireland, where he held the honour of Wexford.
He married, secondly, Lady Margaret Beauchamp, daughter of Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick and Elizabeth de Berkeley, on 6 September 1425 and had four children:
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/John_Talbot,_1st_Earl_of_Shrewsbury   (447 words)

  
 Shrewsbury, John Talbot, 1st earl of --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Shrewsbury, Charles Talbot, duke and 12th earl of, Marquess Of Alton
Thomas Sackville, the 1st earl of Dorset, and an English statesman, poet, and dramatist, is remembered largely for his share in two achievements of significance in the development of Elizabethan poetry and drama: the collection Mirror for Magistrates (1563), probably the most important work between the periods of Geoffrey Chaucer and Edmund Spenser, and the...
As chief justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1953 to 1969, Earl Warren presided during a period of sweeping changes in United States constitutional law, especially in the areas of race relations, criminal procedure, and legislative apportionment.
www.britannica.com /eb/article?tocId=9067536   (844 words)

  
 Hardwick Hall
Tradition says that Mary visited Hardwick, and it is quite possible, as it belonged to the Earl of Shrewsbury, or, rather, to his wife, the celebrated Bess of Hardwick and the Queen of Scots was a prisoner in his charge.
Lord Shrewsbury had been rendered so unhappy and anxious by her temper, - and by that of the queen, - and the care of his dangerous prisoner, that his health failed under his troubles, and he died in 1590, when she built Hardwick.
Lady Shrewsbury (Bess of Hardwick) had under her care, for some time, the Lady Arabella Stuart, whose future fate was to be so romantic and so miserable.
www.mspong.org /picturesque/hardwick_hall.html   (1062 words)

  
 Shropshire. History. Heritage. Shrewsbury Through the Ages</u>   <i>(Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)</i></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Some believe that <b>Shrewsbury</b> owes its origins to the Britons who deserted Viriconium on the banks of the Severn a few miles downstream and found refuge from the invading Saxons at a place they called Pengwern, from where, later, the Prince of Powys ruled his lands. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> At the end of the 9th century, Alfred was on the throne and <b>Shrewsbury</b> would have consisted of little more than a wooden tower and stockade on its highest point, perhaps where the castle stands today. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Roger was the first <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b>, and one of his first tasks was to replace the earlier wooden fort with something more substantial.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.shropshire-promotions.co.uk /Shrews-1.html</font>   (812 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><a href="http://www.thepeerage.com/p1229.htm">thePeerage.com - Person Page 1229</a></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> John Talbot, 2nd <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b> was the son of General John Talbot, 1st <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b> and Maud de Neville, Baroness Furnivalle. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> John Talbot, 3rd <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b> was the son of John Talbot, 2nd <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b> and Elizabeth Butler. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> George Talbot, 4th <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b> was the son of John Talbot, 3rd <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b> and Catherine Stafford.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.thepeerage.com /p1229.htm</font>   (696 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><a href="http://www.rotherhamweb.co.uk/h/shrewsbury.htm">Earl of Shrewsbury</a></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> The fourth and fifth <b>Earls</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b> were both prominent at Court under the early Tudors and the Talbot patrimony reached its greatest extent in the time of Francis, the fifth <b>Earl</b>, who had large grants of monastic and chantry lands, notably Rufford, Worksop Priory, Glossop and Rotherham. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> This <b>Earl's</b> wealth from his estates in at least seven counties and from lead and iron smelting in Derbyshire and Herefordshire were well known, but his expenditure as warder of Mary, Queen of Scots, depleted his fortune. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> The marriage of Alathea, the youngest, to Thomas Howard, <b>Earl</b> of Arundel whose mother was Anne, one of the sisters and co-heiresses of George, Lord Dacre of Gilsland.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.rotherhamweb.co.uk /h/shrewsbury.htm</font>   (1047 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><u>thePeerage.com - Person Page 1215</u>   <i>(Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)</i></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> George Talbot, 6th <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b> was the son of Francis Talbot, 5th <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b> and Mary Dacre. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> She married Gilbert Talbot, 7th <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b>, son of George Talbot, 6th <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b> and Gertrude Manners, between 9 February 1567 and 1568. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Gilbert Talbot, 7th <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b> was the son of George Talbot, 6th <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b> and Gertrude Manners.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.thepeerage.com /p1215.htm</font>   (468 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><u>AllRefer.com - Shrewsbury, John Talbot, 1st earl of (British And Irish History, Biography) - Encyclopedia</u>   <i>(Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)</i></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> <b>Shrewsbury</b>, John Talbot, 1st <b>earl</b> of, British And Irish History, Biographies </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> <b>Shrewsbury</b>, John Talbot, 1st <b>earl</b> of[shrOz´burE, shrOOz´–] Pronunciation Key, 1388?–1453, English soldier. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> As lieutenant of Ireland (1414–19, 1445–47) he quelled unrest in that country, but he achieved his greatest fame for his military daring in France during the latter years of the Hundred Years War.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/S/ShrwsbryJ.html</font>   (196 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><a href="http://hereditarytitles.com/Page24.html">Earl of Shrewsbury</a></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Charles Henry John Benedict Crofton Chetwynd Chetwynd-Talbot, Premier <b>Earl</b> of both England and Ireland - 22nd <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b> and Waterford, 7th <b>Earl</b> Talbot, Viscount Ingestre, Baron Talbot. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Because of his effective service, he was created <b>Earl</b> of the County of Salop, or as usually styled, <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b> on May 20, 1442. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> The current titles of <b>Earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b>, <b>Earl</b> of Waterford, <b>Earl</b> Talbot, Viscount Ingestre, and Baron Talbot are all carried today by Charles Henry John Benedict Crofton Chetwynd Chetwynd-Talbot.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>hereditarytitles.com /Page24.html</font>   (421 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><u>Shrewsbury, John Talbot, 1st earl of on Encyclopedia.com</u>   <i>(Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)</i></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> <b>Shrewsbury</b>, John Talbot, 1st <b>earl</b> of on Encyclopedia.com </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> As lieutenant of Ireland (1414-19, 1445-47) he quelled unrest in that country, but he achieved his greatest fame for his military daring in France during the latter years of the Hundred Years War. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> He was present at the siege of Orléans and was taken prisoner (1429) at Patay and held for four years.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.encyclopedia.com /html/S/ShrwsbryJ1.asp</font>   (251 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><a href="http://www.ku.edu/carrie/texts/carrie_books/nelson/6.html">Chapter 6: The Welsh Reaction</a></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> In the first place, Roger of Montgomery, the <b>earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b>, died, and was succeeded by Hugh, his second son. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Hugh of Chester, one of the great warriors of marcher tradition, was dead; Hereford and <b>Shrewsbury</b> were escheated to the crown; and Gloucester lay in the hands of Robert Fitz-Hamon, a man increasingly involved in the continental struggles between King Henry and Duke Robert. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> The great <b>earls</b> and the border barons who had achieved the successes of the previous century, had proved incapable of consolidating and holding what they had won, and, what is more, had proven extremely dangerous to the peace of the realm of England.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.ku.edu /carrie/texts/carrie_books/nelson/6.html</font>   (7090 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><a href="http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9067535?tocId=9067535">Shrewsbury, Roger de Montgomery, 1st earl of --  Encyclopædia Britannica</a></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> More results on <b>"Shrewsbury</b>, Roger de Montgomery, 1st <b>earl</b> of" when you join. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> In the 11th century the Norman Roger de Montgomery, 1st <b>earl</b> of <b>Shrewsbury</b>, built his castle at Hendomen, northwest of the present town, and a small village developed under its walls. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> The capital of Alabama and seat of Montgomery County, Montgomery is known as the Cradle of the Confederacy.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.britannica.com /eb/article-9067535?tocId=9067535</font>   (799 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><a href="http://www.jacobite.ca/documents/16880630.htm">Invitation to the Prince of Orange, June 30, 1688</a></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Lord Lumley was a famous convert from Catholicism to Protestantism; he received the title "Viscount Lumley" from the Prince of Orange in 1689 and the title <b>"Earl</b> of Scarborough" in 1690. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> He served as a rear-admiral in the Royal Navy, but was cashiered when he refused to serve with Catholic officers after the Declaration of Indulgence. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> He commanded the fleet which conveyed the Prince of Orange to England and received the title <b>"Earl</b> of Torrington" from the Prince of Orange in 1689.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.jacobite.ca /documents/16880630.htm</font>   (520 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><script language="JavaScript"> <!-- // This function displays the ad results. // It must be defined above the script that calls show_ads.js // to guarantee that it is defined when show_ads.js makes the call-back. function google_ad_request_done(google_ads) { // Proceed only if we have ads to display! 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