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Topic: Eastern Malayo-Polynesian languages


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In the News (Thu 23 May 19)

  
 Malayo-Polynesian languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Malayo-Polynesian (MP) languages are divided into two major subgroups, the Western MP and the Central-Eastern MP.
The Malayo-Polynesian languages tend to use reduplication (repetition of all or part of a word) to express the plural, and like other Austronesian languages have a low entropy ; that is, a text is quite repetitive in terms of the frequency of sounds.
All of the said languages have official status in the countries and territories of the Pacific Ocean.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Malayo-Polynesian_languages

  
 JAKWEB.COM IndonesiaONE.Net > East Nusatenggara > Languages
North central Flores, between Eastern Manggarai and Riung.
Central Flores, northeast of Ngad'a, on the northern and western slopes of Ebu Lobo volcano.
South central Flores, between Ngad'a and Nage in Kecamatan Golewa in the administrative villages of Sara Sedu, Taka Tunga, Sanga Deto, and in Kecamatan Boawae in desa Rowa, all in Kabupaten Ngada.
www.jakweb.com /id/ntt/language/language4_1.htm

  
 Eastern Malayo-Polynesian languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The family of Eastern Malayo-Polynesian languages is a subgroup of the Central Eastern Malayo-Polynesian languages.
This page was last modified 16:18, 19 May 2005.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Eastern_Malayo-Polynesian_languages

  
 POLYNESIA, (Gr. iroXi,, many, and vnno-os, island) - Online Information article about POLYNESIA, (Gr. iroXi,, many, and vnno-os, island)
Owing to the admixture of the Polynesians with the Papuans in Fiji some authorities have thought the first settlement was in those islands, and that the settlers were eventually driven thence by the Papuan occupiers.
Having no I The Polynesians invariably believe in the existence of the spirit metal or other vessels in which to boil water, all cooking is done by of man after the death of the body.
Polynesians generally are of singularly cleanly habits, love bathing, and have a taste for neatness and order.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /PIG_POL/POLYNESIA_Gr_iroXi_many_and_vn.html

  
 Oceanic subgroups
Austronesian languages are spoken from Madagascar in the west to Easter Island in the east, and from Taiwan and Hawaii in the north to New Zealand in the south.
He maintains that speakers of languages outside the Western Oceanic group migrated from the area in which POC was spoken, and that the languages of the Western Oceanic group evolved by a process of dialect differentiation from that point on.
The Oceanic languages are members of the Austronesian language family, a language family which, until the advent of European exploration and settlement of the 'New World', had spread out across a considerably larger proportion of the earth than had any other language family.
www.tlg.uci.edu /~opoudjis/Work/Oceanic_guide.html

  
 Ethnologue: Indonesia, Maluku
Eastern Teluti Bay to the north coast, districts of Seram, Bula, Werinama, and Tehoru, central Maluku, 8 villages.
Language use is declining in Ujir because of the influence of Malay used by an increasing number of outsiders.
Central Maluku, west Seram, 15 villages; 13 in Kairatu, mainly in the interior, and two westernmost coastal villages of Amahai District.
www.christusrex.org /www1/pater/ethno/Indm.html

  
 Philippines - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
More than 170 languages are spoken in the Philippines and almost all of them belong to the Western Malayo-Polynesian language group of the Austronesian language family.
The Moluccas and Celebes are farther south and on the eastern side of the Philippine Sea is Palau.
The official languages are Filipino (largely based on Tagalog) and American English.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Philippines

  
 Family tree - Polynesian languages
Rapa is here classified as a Tahitic language, and not as an unclassified language within the Central Polynesian subgroup, based on Biggs' 1971 statement that the language spoken on the island of Rapa today is a variant of the Tahitian language.
A bibliography of works refered to on this page may be found in the Polynesian Literature List.
J.F.G. Stokes 1955, however, claims that another language, clearly distinct from the other Tahitic languages, was earlier spoken on Rapa; and Niko Besnier 1992 classifies Rapa as a Marquesic language.
www.ling.su.se /pollinet/facts/tree.html

  
 Central Eastern Malayo-Polynesian languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The family of Central Eastern Malayo-Polynesian languages is a subgroup of the Malayo-Polynesian languages.
This page was last modified 12:56, 5 June 2005.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Central-Eastern_Malayo-Polynesian_languages

  
 SIL Bibliography: Language classification
McElhanon, Kenneth A. "Lexicostatistics and the classification of Huon Peninsula languages."
McElhanon, Kenneth A. A classification of the languages of the Morobe province, Papua New Guinea, with the linguistic situation of individual villages.
Clouse, Duane A. "Towards a reconstruction and reclassification of the Lakes Plain languages of Irian Jaya."
www.ethnologue.com /show_subject.asp?code=LCL

  
 Online Database of Languages, Linguasphere.org
The aims of the Foundation are to raise awareness of endangered languages, both inside and outside the communities where they are spoken; to support the use of endangered languages in all contexts; to monitor linguistic policies and practices, and to seek to influence the appropriate authorities where necessary.
WLI is a section of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at the State University of New York at Buffalo that offers language and culture instruction in twelve less commonly taught languages, and promotes global awareness and intercultural sensitivity on campus and in the community.
The website is a useful source of information about the Creole world and Creole languages.
www.linguasphere.org /links.html

  
 Reference.com/Web Search/eastern malayo-polynesian
The family of Eastern Malayo - Polynesian languages is a subgroup of the...
The family of Central Eastern Malayo - Polynesian languages is a subgroup of the
Eastern Malayo - Polynesian - definition of Eastern Malayo...
www.reference.com /search?q=eastern+malayo-polynesian

  
 Tahitian facts
A bibliography of works refered to in this file may be found in the Polynesian Literature List.
Te parau a Honoura (in: Journal of the Polynesian Society, vol 4, p 256-294).
Conversational Tahitian: An introduction to the Tahitian language of French Polynesia.
www.ling.su.se /pollinet/facts/tah.html

  
 Ethnologue report for Solomon Islands
Classification: Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Central-Eastern Oceanic, Southeast Solomonic, Malaita-San Cristobal, Malaita, Longgu
Classification: Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Central-Eastern Oceanic, Remote Oceanic, Eastern Outer Islands, Utupua Nearly extinct.
Dialects: Brought over long ago by settlers from Malaita; probably not intelligible with Malaitan languages.
www.ethnologue.com /show_country.asp?name=Solomon+Islands

  
 East Fijian-Polynesian languages - Enpsychlopedia
The family of East Fijian-Polynesian languages is a subgroup of the Central Pacific languages.
www.grohol.com /psypsych/East_Fijian-Polynesian_languages

  
 Science - Social Sciences - Linguistics - Languages - Natural - Austronesian - Malayo-Polynesian
Polynesian Languages and Literature Group - Polynesian language texts, literature citations, mailing list and general information.
An Introduction to Oceanic Linguistic Prehistory - Article on the current state of research in Oceanic languages with commentary on how these related languages should be grouped.
Linguistic Evidence for Primogeniture and Ranking in Proto-Oceanic Society - Exploration of dichronic and synchronic evidence supporting the claim that if Proto-Oceanic society was based on primogeniture and ranking, the term for elder sibling shuld be marked in Oceanic terminologies.
resources.usresolve.org /category/Science/Social_Sciences/Linguistics/Languages/Natural/Austronesian/Malayo-Polynesian

  
 CIA - The World Factbook -- East Timor
Southeastern Asia, northwest of Australia in the Lesser Sunda Islands at the eastern end of the Indonesian archipelago; note - East Timor includes the eastern half of the island of Timor, the Oecussi (Ambeno) region on the northwest portion of the island of Timor, and the islands of Pulau Atauro and Pulau Jaco
All Factbook content used by permission of the Central Intelligence Agency.
On 20 May 2002, East Timor was internationally recognized as an independent state.
www.phatnav.com /factbook/geos/tt.html

  
 Lexique of Marquesian
Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Remote Oceanic, Central Pacific, Polynesian, Nuclear, East, Central, Marquesic
Marquesan is the antecedent to modern Polynesian languages.
If you want to know more about the language, please consult the following page.
www.alptuna.com /public/marquesas/LEXIQUE.htm

  
 Link Sink for Formosan & Malayo-Polynesian Linguistics
Less Commonly Taught Languages Project (CARLA, U Minnesota)
The Tukang Besi Language of Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia [Ph.D. diss.
Donald Gilbert Kennedy: Handbook on the Language of the Ellice Islands (Henry Lundsgaarde)
www.pair.com /waldzell/fmp-list/LinkSink

  
 Katalog :  : Science : Social_Sciences : Linguistics : Languages : Natural : Austronesian : Malayo-Polynesian : Eastern : Fijian - Netz-Tipp.De
Implications of a Syntactically Ambiguous Structure in Standard Fijian - Research claiming that syntactically ambiguous structure implies a transition from one structure to another in the historical past which has further implications on how some Fijian dialects should be subgrouped.
Learn Fijian Online - Write or Speak in Fijian Language Exchange - Learn and practice your Fijian with a native speaker in a language exchange via email, text chat, and voice chat.
Welcome to Fijian Language - Brief description of Fijian grammar.
www.netz-tipp.de /kat/Science/Social_Sciences/Linguistics/Languages/Natural/Austronesian/Malayo-Polynesian/Eastern/Tongan

  
 Ethnicity and Race by Countries
Eastern Hamitic stock (Egyptians, Bedouins, and Berbers) 99%, Greek, Nubian, Armenian, other European (primarily Italian and French) 1%
Melanesian 93%, Polynesian 4%, Micronesian 1.5%, European 0.8%, Chinese 0.3%, other 0.4%
Samoan 92.6%, Euronesians 7% (persons of European and Polynesian blood), Europeans 0.4%
www.infoplease.com /ipa/A0855617.html

  
 Ethnologue: Solomon Islands
Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Central-Eastern Oceanic, Southeast Solomonic, Malaita-San Cristobal, Malaita, Longgu.
Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Central-Eastern Oceanic, Southeast Solomonic, Gela-Guadalcanal, Guadalcanal.
Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Central-Eastern Oceanic, Southeast Solomonic, Gela-Guadalcanal, Bughotu.
www.christusrex.org /www3/ethno/Solo.html

  
 Ethnologue report for New Caledonia
Classification: Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Central-Eastern Oceanic, Remote Oceanic, New Caledonian, Northern, North Nearly extinct.
Classification: Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Central-Eastern Oceanic, Remote Oceanic, New Caledonian, Southern, South, Wailic Nearly extinct.
Classification: Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Central-Eastern Oceanic, Remote Oceanic, New Caledonian, Southern, South, Wailic
www.ethnologue.com /show_country.asp?name=New+Caledonia

  
 StressTyp
Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Western Oceanic, Papuan Tip,Nuclear, North Papuan Mainland-D'Entrecasteaux,Are-Taupota, Taupota.
Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Western Oceanic, North NewGuinea, Huon Gulf, North.
Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, South Halmahera-West New Guinea, South Halmahera, East Makian-Gane.
www.let.uu.nl /~Anne-Marie.Mineur/personal/TD_Project/stresstyp-metadata.html

  
 Ethnologue report for Papua New Guinea
Classification: Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Western Oceanic, Meso Melanesian, New Ireland, South New Ireland-Northwest Solomonic, Patpatar-Tolai Nearly extinct.
Classification: Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Admiralty Islands, Eastern, Southeast Islands
Of those, 820 are living languages and 10 are extinct.
www.ethnologue.com /show_country.asp?name=Papua+New+Guinea

  
 UH Press Journals: Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 32, no. 2 (1993)
CMP, encompassing over 100 languages in the Lesser Sunda and Moluccan islands of eastern Indonesia, is justified by a set of phonological, lexical, and morphosyntactic innovations that often fail to include all members of the proposed group.
These overlapping distributions of innovated features in CMP languages are interpreted as evidence for a rapid spread of Austronesian speakers through eastern Indonesia from a primary dispersal point in Northern Moluccas soon after separation of the ancestral CMP and EMP language communities.
It is concluded that the Bomberai languages reached their historical locations through a back-migration from the southern Moluccas well after the initial Austronesian settlement of eastern Indonesia.
www.uhpress.hawaii.edu /journals/ol/OL322.html   (1126 words)

  
 Austronesian languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Formosan languages, unrelated to Chinese) and one ancestral to all other members of the family ( Malayo-Polynesian languages).
Austronesian is one of the largest language families in the world, both in terms of number of languages (1244 according to Ethnologue) and in terms of the geographical extent of the homelands of its languages (from Madagascar to
However, it is clear that the greatest genealogical diversity is found among the Formosan languages of Taiwan, and the least among the islands of the Pacific, supporting a dispersal of the family from Taiwan or mainland China.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Austronesian_languages   (1126 words)

  
 Niuean language
The Niuean language or Niue language (Niuean: ko e vagahau Niuē) is a Polynesian language, belonging to the Malayo-Polynesian subgroup of the Austronesian languages.
This has led to some Samoan influences in morphology and grammar and also to a noticeable one in spelling: the sound /ŋ/ ( SAMPA /N/) is written g, rather than ng as in Tongan and other Polynesian languages with this sound.
A Vocabulary and Grammar of the Niue Dialect of the Polynesian Language.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/niuean_language   (1126 words)

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