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Topic: Ecclesiastical Latin


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In the News (Mon 25 Mar 19)

  
  Latin
Latin is a member of the family of Italic languages, and its alphabet, the Latin alphabet, is based on the Old Italic alphabet, which is in turn derived from the Greek alphabet.
Latin was first brought to the Italian peninsula in the 9th or 8th century BC by migrants from the north, who settled in the Latium region, specifically around the River Tiber, where the Roman civilization first developed.
Latin translations of modern literature such as Paddington Bear, Winnie the Pooh, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Le Petit Prince, Max und Moritz, Walter the Farting Dog, and The Cat in the Hat are intended to bolster interest in the language.
articles.gourt.com /en/Latin   (2190 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Church Latin
The aristocracy, who alone spoke it, were decimated by proscription and civil war, and the families who rose in turn to social position were mainly of plebeian or foreign extraction, and in any case unaccustomed to the delicacy of the literary language.
Africa, Greek was the chosen language of the clerics, to begin with, but Latin was the more familiar speech for the majority of the faithful, and it must have soon taken the lead in the Church, since Tertullian, who wrote some of his earlier works in Greek, ended by employing Latin only.
Henceforth correctness was to be the characteristic of ecclesiastical Latin.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/09019a.htm   (3275 words)

  
 Search Results for "Ecclesiastical Latin"
Latin Writings in England to the Time of Alfred.
Rota Roman Catholic Church A tribunal of prelates that serves as an ecclesiastical court.
Late Latin ecclsiasticus, from Greek ekklsiastikos, from ekklsiasts, a member of the ecclesia.
www.bartleby.com /cgi-bin/texis/webinator/sitesearch?FILTER=&query=Ecclesiastical+Latin   (293 words)

  
 Latin Translation Service - English to Latin Translation
Latin is unlike most of the languages we translate, in that it’s an extinct language.
Ecclesiastical Latin however, is still the official, 'national' language of Vatican City.
Latin has exerted a major influence on many other languages spoken through the world and continues to see limited use in academia, medicine, scientific classification and law.
www.appliedlanguage.com /languages/latin_translation.shtml   (421 words)

  
  Latin   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ecclesiastical Latin remains the formal language of the Roman Catholic Church to this day, and thus the official national language of the Vatican.
Latin is also still used (drawing heavily on Greek roots) to furnish the names used in the scientific classification of living things.
Latin is a synthetic or inflectional language: affixes are attached to fixed stems to express gender, number, and case in adjectives, nouns, and pronouns, which is called declension; and person, number, tense, voice, mood, and aspect in verbs, which is called conjugation.
www.abcworld.net /Latin.html   (1411 words)

  
  Ecclesiastical Latin
Latin words were created by derivations from existing Latin or Greek words by the addition of suffixes or prefixes, or by the combination of two or more words together (e.
Hardly had it been formed when church Latin had to undergo the shock of the invasion of the barbarians and the fall of the Empire of the West; it was a shock that gave the death-blow to literary Latin as well as to the Latin of everyday speech on which church Latin was waxing strong.
Until recently, Latin had retained its place in the Liturgy, as it was seen to point out and watch over, in the very bosom of the Church, that unity of belief in all places and throughout all times which is her birthright.
www.catholicity.com /encyclopedia/l/latin,ecclesiastical.html   (3155 words)

  
  Online Encyclopedia and Dictionary - Latin
Ecclesiastical Latin remains the formal language of the Roman Catholic Church to this day, which makes it the official national language of the Vatican.
Latin is also still used (drawing heavily on Greek roots) to furnish the names used in the scientific classification of living things.
Latin is a synthetic or inflectional language: affixes are attached to fixed stems to express gender, number, and case in adjectives, nouns, and pronouns, which is called declension; and person, number, tense, voice, mood, and aspect in verbs, which is called conjugation.
www.fact-archive.com /encyclopedia/Latin   (1036 words)

  
 Latin at AllExperts
Latin is a member of the family of Italic languages, and its alphabet, the Latin alphabet, is based on the Old Italic alphabet, which is in turn derived from the Greek alphabet.
Latin was first brought to the Italian peninsula in the 9th or 8th century BC by migrants from the north, who settled in the Latium region, specifically around the River Tiber, where the Roman civilization first developed.
Latin is a synthetic inflectional language: affixes (often suffixes, which usually encode more than one grammatical category) are attached to fixed stems to express gender, number, and case in adjectives, nouns, and pronouns a process called 'conjugation'.
en.allexperts.com /e/l/la/latin.htm   (2076 words)

  
 Latin language, alphabet and pronunciation
Latin was the language of the area known as Latium (modern Lazio), and Rome was one of the towns of Latium.
Latin was used throughout the empire as the language of law, administration and increasingly as the language of everyday life.
Modern Latin was used by the Roman Catholic Church until the mid 20th century and is still used to some extent, particularly in the Vatican City, where it is one of the official languages.
www.omniglot.com /writing/latin2.htm   (777 words)

  
 Ecclesiastical Latin - Definition, explanation
Ecclesiastical Latin, sometimes called "Church Latin", is the Latin language as used in documents of the Roman Catholic Church and in the Latin liturgies of both the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches.
The rule now in force on the use of Latin in the eucharistic liturgy of the Roman rite is: "Mass is celebrated either in Latin or in another language, provided that liturgical texts are used which have been approved according to the norm of law.
Ecclesiastical Latin is in most countries pronounced[1] as is traditional in Rome, giving the letters the value they have in modern Italian, but without distinguishing between open and close "e" and "o".
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/e/ec/ecclesiastical_latin.php   (1058 words)

  
 Amazon.de: Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin: English Books: John F. Collins   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ecclesiastical Latin is so much more inviting to write than Classical Latin is, and as such this book makes a valuable contribution to keeping the Latin language alive.
Those learning or teaching Latin for ecclesiastical usage are very quickly faced with the problem that most text books are intended to teach *classical* and military Latin, usually preparing introductory students to first read the works of Julius Caesar and then of the other classic writers.
There is, I feel, no better text for ecclesiastical Latin on the market, and it deserves to be ranked on par with such academic standards as Wheelock or Henle (both of which stress classical, not ecclesiastical, Latin).
www.amazon.de /Primer-Ecclesiastical-Latin-John-Collins/dp/0813206677   (824 words)

  
 Latin
Latin developed in west-central Italy in an area along the River Tiber known as Latium which became the birthplace of the Roman civilization.
The Catholic Church used Latin as its primary liturgical language until the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) after which it was largely replaced by the local spoken languages of the parishioners.
However, Ecclesiastical Latin, also known as Church Latin, remains the official language of Vatican City, and is used in documents of the Roman Catholic Church and in its Latin liturgies.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/january/Latin.html   (1672 words)

  
 Ecclesiastical Latin
Ecclesiastical Latin refers to the pronunciation and usages of Latin by the Catholic Church.
Classical Latin is what classics departments in major universities teach, and is also the Latin taught on language tapes, unless Ecclesiastical Latin is specified.
In Ecclesiastical Latin, which is defined as Latin spoken as Italian would be pronounced in Rome, the "g" is soft and the c has a "ch" sound.
www.ewtn.com /expert/answers/ecclesiastical_latin.htm   (796 words)

  
 Indian Christianity
Latin words were created by derivations from existing Latin or Greek words by the addition of suffixes or prefixes, or by the combination of two or more words together (e.
With the exception of some Hebraic or Hellenist expressions popularized through Bible translations, the grammatical peculiarities to be met with in ecclesiastical Latin are not to be laid to the charge of Christianity; they are the result of an evolution through which the common language passed, and are to be met with among non-Christian writers.
Hardly had it been formed when church Latin had to undergo the shock of the invasion of the barbarians and the fall of the Empire of the West; it was a shock that gave the death-blow to literary Latin as well as to the Latin of everyday speech on which church Latin was waxing strong.
www.indianchristianity.org /latin.html   (6744 words)

  
 The Pronunciation of CHURCH / Ecclesiastical Latin
The second, and the one we are concerned with here, is Ecclesiastical Pronunciation, which is the way Latin has been spoken from somewhere in the 3rd/4th centuries down to present day and is the way Latin is spoken in the Church.
Technically Latin has no letter J. It was introduced in the 13th century or thereabouts to differentiate between the vowel i and the consonant i.
In Latin, it is the ending of the word that indicates who did what to whom.
www.harding.edu /USER/jmfortner/WWW/HIST377GENPronuncChurchLatinWord.htm   (778 words)

  
 The Pronunciation of Ecclesiastical Latin and Classical Latin
With the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, Latin “died” as a popular, spoken language.
But Latin was retained as the universal language of the Church, and, over time, ecclesiastical Latin developed some pronunciation differences that distinguish it from Classical Latin.
Latin has two ways to pronounce vowels: long and short, referring to the “length” of time spent in voicing the vowel, which changes the sound.
www.shrinesf.org /latin.htm   (273 words)

  
 Ecclesiastical Latin Resources
Ecclesiastical Latin is that form of Latin that emerged from Classical Latin beginning about the 4th century A.D. Despite being gradually replaced by various vernacular tongues up through the 16th century, ecclesiastical Latin has been used continuously by the Catholic Church as its primary language to the present day.
Neither intended for nor capable of teaching Latin as a whole, this work instead focuses on points of grammar and syntax needed to get a decent idea of what the prayers of the Divine Office mean.
Geared to ecclesiastical (emphasis on Scriptural) Latin, this series by a Vatican Latin master teaches Latin as the living language it is. Comes with printed support materials.
www.canonlaw.info /catholicissues_ecclatin.htm   (1402 words)

  
 Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin
The Wheelock vocabulary sections throw a lot of strange archaic, even for Latin, words at the student that have little or no conection to other languages and would be completley unfamiliar to the student, thus causing them to have to look up words in the back of the book constantly.
PEL presents Latin as a complete and full language that is not defective, dead or broken as is suggested by Wheelock.
Although Latin is no longer the universal language of the Church, it continues to shape our thinking about theological matters in the form of vocabulary drawn from texts.
www.8notes.com /books/detpage.asp?asin=0813206677&field-keywords=Couperin&schMod=music&type=&sb=s   (1387 words)

  
 Dictionary of Ecclesiastical Latin
The Dictionary of Ecclesiastical Latin includes approximately 17,000 words with the common meanings of the Latin terms found in church writings.
This volume will prove to be an invaluable resource for theological students, as well as for those seeking to improve their knowledge of ecclesiastical Latin.
Both this dictionary and TAN's "Latin Grammar" represent ignorance in language-acquisition by reducing Latin's rule-bound syllable-emphasis system based on a dual-vowel system to a mere diacritical mark above 'stressed vowel' which is to be memorized in a arbitrary manner.
www.xmlwriter.net /books/viewbook/Dictionary_of_Ecclesiastical_Latin-1565631315.html   (852 words)

  
 Learning Latin Language, Books, Resources Latin expressions, Latin Grammar, Latin language learning books resources
Latin is an inflected language: nouns and verbs change their endings according to their use in a sentence.
The study of Latin helps one to understand that words in a sentence have definite relationships, that there is meaning to utterances and that the meaning is shown through the words and their inflections.
The Latin is excellent, although the use of "ille" for "the" is a stretch in classical Latin.
www.touniteamerica.com /languages/latin.shtml   (1479 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Ecclesiastical Abbreviations
ecclesiastical legislation, the creation of new offices, etc. There was less medieval abbreviation in the text of books much used on public occasions, e.g.
Latin transliteration of the first three letters of JESUS in Greek (IHS for IHC).
A very useful work for all Latin abbreviations is that of CAPELLI, Dizionario delle abbreviature latine ed italiane (Milan, 1900); it is written mostly in Latin and describes all the abbreviations ordinarily used in Latin and Italian documents, civil or ecclesiastical.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/01022a.htm   (2064 words)

  
 Dictionary of Ecclesiastical Latin
The Dictionary of Ecclesiastical Latin includes approximately 17,000 words with the common meaning of Latin terms found in Church writings.
Entries cover Scripture, Canon Law, the Liturgy, Vatican II, the early church fathers, and theological students, as well as for those seeking to improve their knowledge of Ecclesiastical Latin.
The Dictionary of Ecclesiastical Latin has already been widely praised for its serviceability and indespensability in both academic and Church settings.
www.catholicbook.net /dicofeclat.html   (100 words)

  
 An Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin
An Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin was written to meet the needs of students who desire to study the Latin language in the form it assumed in the hands of the Fathers of the Western Church and of their successors.
Ecclesiastical Latin is out of print but used print copies are available for between $35-100.
"Ecclesiastical Latin may be defined as the form which the Latin language assumed in the hands of the Fathers of the Western Church and of their successors up to the time of the revival of learning.
www.logos.com /ebooks/details/INTROECCLAT   (323 words)

  
 Latin Mass Society of England & Wales
This letter (PDF) has been mailed to all Latin Mass Society members with the November 2007 issue of Mass of Ages magazine.
Mass in Rome: As a first fruit of the Holy Father's recent Motu Proprio, the LMS's ecclesiastical representative in Rome has now received permission to move the LMS’s quarterly Low Mass (which previously had been celebrated in the Crypt) to the Chapel of St Michele in the Nave.
Almighty and everlasting God, who hast taken up the Immaculate Virgin Mary, the Mother of Thy Son, with body and soul into heavenly glory: grant, we be- seech Thee, that we may always, intent on higher things, deserve to be partakers of her glory.
www.latin-mass-society.org   (835 words)

  
 Catholic News Agency: Remove Latin from ‘ecclesiastical refrigerator,’ Vatican cardinal urges - Catholic Online
In his address on the last day of the conference, titled "Language in the Latin Rite Liturgy: Latin and Vernacular," Cardinal Arinze said the early church used Greek but it was "Latinized" in the fourth century, reported the St.
He suggested that larger parishes offer Mass in Latin at least once a week and that smaller, rural parishes offer it at least once a month.
Any priest can celebrate the Vatican II “Novus Ordo” Mass in Latin, though permission must be obtained from a local bishop to celebrate the Latin Mass in the old, Tridentine Rite.
www.catholic.org /national/national_story.php?id=21989   (659 words)

  
 A primer of ecclesiastical Latin by John F. Collins | LibraryThing
A primer of ecclesiastical Latin by John F. Collins
501 Latin verbs fully conjugated in all the tenses in a new easy-to-learn format, alphabetically arranged by Richard E. Prior
Dictionary of ecclesiastical Latin : with an appendix of Latin expressions defined and clarified by Leo F. Stelten
www.librarything.com /catalog.php?book=3975961&mode=social&referpage=%3Fview%3Djonvw   (179 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Ecclesiastical Feasts
In the course of centuries the ecclesiastical calendar expanded considerably, because in earlier ages every bishop had a right to establish new
feasts took place, partly by regular ecclesiastical legislation, partly in consequence of revolutions in State and
By the French revolution the ecclesiastical calendar had been radically abolished, and at the reorganization of the
www.newadvent.org /cathen/06021b.htm   (1638 words)

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