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Topic: Eclecticism


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In the News (Wed 20 Mar 19)

  
  CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Eclecticism
Eclecticism then aims at constructing a system broad and vague enough to include, or not to exclude, the principles of the divers schools, though giving at times more importance to those of one school, and apparently sufficient to furnish a basis for the conduct of
Eclecticism is represented among the Epicureans by Asclepiades of Bithynia; among the Stoics by Boethius, Panetius of
Eclecticism, considered as a study of the opinions and theories of others in order to find in them some help and enlightenment, has its place in philosophy; it is a part of
www.newadvent.org /cathen/05276a.htm   (985 words)

  
  Eclecticism - LoveToKnow 1911
Eclecticism always tends to spring up after a period of vigorous constructive speculation, especially in the later stages of a controversy between thinkers of pre-eminent ability.
Theoretically, therefore, eclecticism is a perfectly sound method, and the contemptuous significance which the word has acquired is due partly to the fact that many eclectics have been intellectual trimmers, sceptics or dilettanti, and partly to mere partisanship.
Eclecticism gained great popularity, and, partly owing to Cousin's position as minister of public instruction, became the authorized system in the chief seats of learning in France, where it has given a most remarkable impulse to the study of the history of philosophy.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Eclecticism   (911 words)

  
 Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 5: Diocese-Fathers of Mercy | Christian Classics Ethereal Library
In the first sense, eclecticism is a characteristic of all the great philosophers, with special development in some, such as Leibniz; an element of the integral method of philosophy more or less emphasized in the divers schools.
Eclecticism then aims at constructing a system broad and vague enough to include, or not to exclude, the principles of the divers schools, though giving at times more importance to those of one school, and apparently sufficient to furnish a basis for the conduct of life.
In a word, Eclecticism, considered as a study of the opinions and theories of others in order to find in them some help and enlightenment, has its place in philosophy; it is a part of philosophic method; but as a doctrine it is altogether inadequate.
www.ccel.org /ccel/herbermann/cathen05.html?term=Eclecticism   (1057 words)

  
 Eclecticism
Eclecticism is a kind of mixed style in the fine arts, in which features are borrowed from various sources and styles.
Eclecticism was an important concept in Western architecture during the mid- and late 19th century, and it reappeared in a new guise in the latter part of the 20th century.
Eclecticism is the method of a group of ancient philosophers who tried to select from the existing philosophical beliefs those doctrines that seemed most reasonable to them.
www.jahsonic.com /Eclecticism.html   (432 words)

  
  Eclecticism
In the first sense, eclecticism is a characteristic of all the great philosophers, with special development in some, such as Leibniz; an element of the integral method of philosophy more or less emphasized in the divers schools.
Eclecticism then aims at constructing a system broad and vague enough to include, or not to exclude, the principles of the divers schools, though giving at times more importance to those of one school, and apparently sufficient to furnish a basis for the conduct of life.
In a word, Eclecticism, considered as a study of the opinions and theories of others in order to find in them some help and enlightenment, has its place in philosophy; it is a part of philosophic method; but as a doctrine it is altogether inadequate.
www.catholicity.com /encyclopedia/e/eclecticism.html   (1030 words)

  
 Eclecticism Information
Eclecticism is an approach to thought that does not hold rigidly to a single paradigm or set of assumptions or conclusions, but instead draws upon multiple theories to gain complementary insights into phenomena, or applies only certain theories in particular cases.
Eclecticism is a term that plays an important role in critical discussions and evaluations but is somehow distant from the actual forms of the artefacts to which it is applied, and its meaning is thus rather indistinct.
Eclecticism in psychology is also supported by many in that in reality many factors influence behaviour and psyche, therefore it is inevitable to consider all perspectives in identifying, changing, explaining, and determining behaviour.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Eclecticism   (465 words)

  
 Eclecticism [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
"Eclecticism" is a name given to a group of ancient philosophers who, from the existing philosophical beliefs, tried to select the doctrines that seemed to them most reasonable, and out of these constructed a new system (see Diogenes Laertius, 21).
Eclecticism sought to reach by selection the highest possible degree of probability, in the despair of attaining to what is absolutely true.
In the late period of Greek philosophy there appears an eclectic system consisting of a compromise between the Neo-Pythagoreans and the various Platonic sects.
www.iep.utm.edu /e/eclectic.htm   (311 words)

  
 eclecticism - Encyclopedia.com
Eclecticism among Renaissance humanists, who drew from Christian and classical doctrines, was followed by a 19th-century revival, particularly with French philosopher Victor Cousin, who coined the term and applied it to his own system.
Eclectics are frequently charged with being inconsistent, and the term is sometimes used pejoratively.
Extending eclecticism: Herzog & de Meuron bring a new sense of animation and dynamism to a historic Midwest cultural institution.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-eclctc-phi.html   (1036 words)

  
 Eclecticism in Islam, Arthur Jeffery, 1922
Historically the most famous case of Eclecticism is that in Greek philosophy, when after the waning of the post-Aristotelian systems such a movement appeared and reigned till, after the final flicker of Neo-platonism, Greek Philosophy went out in the dark night of scholasticism.
The last of these eclectic movements in Islam that we have space to mention, is the modern Indian sect of the Ahmadiyyas, founded by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad Khan in 1888, and now mainly championed by Khwajah KamalĀ­ud-Din, the leader of the Ahmadiyya Mission to England.
This unorthodox eclecticism is very evident too in their new English version of the Koran with Commentary, and of the writings and speeches of the present main pillar, Khwajah Kamal-ud-Din.
www.bible.ca /islam/library/Jeffery/eclectic.htm   (5630 words)

  
 eclecticism - Encyclopedia.com
eclecticism, art style in which features are borrowed from various styles.
Among the most influential advocates of eclecticism were Sir Joshua Reynolds and John Ruskin.
Safe eclecticism may be the most appropriate term for this year' s group...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-eclctc-art.html   (983 words)

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