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Topic: Economy of Brazil


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In the News (Thu 18 Apr 19)

  
  Brazil
Brazil was first sighted by Europeans in 1500 and developed as a Portuguese commercial colony, based to a large extent on slavery.
Brazil received an influx of over 5 million immigrants in the late 19th, early 20th centuries, a period that also saw Brazil industrialise and further expand into its interior.
Brazil is characterised by the extensive low-lying Amazon Rainforest in the north, and a more open terrain of hills and (low) mountains to the south, home to most of Brazil's population and its agricultural base.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/br/Brazil.html   (874 words)

  
 Economy of Brazil - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Brazil is one of the world's leading producers of hydroelectric power, with a current capacity of about 58,000 megawatts.
The economy grew 4.4% in 2000, decreasing to 1.3% in 2001.
After a GDP increase of 0.05% in 2003, Brazil showed robust growth in 2004 of 4.9%, decreasing to the pace of 2.3% (2005); international economic growth and, consequentially, expansion of exports, contributed to this performance.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Economy_of_Brazil   (2459 words)

  
 Brazil History, Government & Economy
His son declared Brazil's independence on September 7, 1822, and became emperor with the title of Dom Pedro I. His son, Dom Pedro II, ruled from 1831 to 1889, when a federal republic was established in a coup led by Deodoro da Fonseca, Marshal of the Army.
Brazil is a federal republic with 26 states and a federal district.
The economy was under critical stress in 2002 with election uncertainties, the 35% depreciation of the real, less foreign direct investment (dropping to $16.6 billion, $6 billion less than the previous year's total), and speculation that Brazil might follow Argentina by defaulting on public debt.
www.pacificcoasttravelinfo.com /brazilhistory.asp   (818 words)

  
 Brazil Economy
Brazil's projected GDP for 2003 is $508.4 (2.3% growth), 2002 was estimated at $499.4 (1.5% growth), 2001 was $503.9 billion (1.7% growth), and 2000 was $594.2 billion (4.5% growth).
Brazil's economy is highly diversified with wide variations in levels of development.
The economy was under critical stress in 2002 with election uncertainties, the 35% depreciation of the real, less foreign direct investment (dropping to $16.6 billion, 6 billion less than the previous year's total), and speculation that Brazil might go the way of Argentina.
www.multied.com /nationbynation/Brazil/Economy.html   (1280 words)

  
 Brazil Economy -The Coffee Economy, 1840-1930
The impact of coffee on the Brazilian economy was much stronger than that of sugar and gold.
However, by 1840 Brazil was already under pressure to abolish slavery, and a series of decrees were introduced, making it increasingly difficult to supply the new coffee areas with servile labor.
Coffee was the mainstay of the economy, accounting for 63 percent of the country's exports in 1891.
www.floridabrasil.com /brazil/guide-about-Brazil-Economy-Coffee.htm   (824 words)

  
 MapZones.com : Brazil Economy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
Brazil is also important for what it has not yet fully exploited—its vast mineral and hydroelectric potential, its hardwood forests, and millions of acres of soil, most of which could be fertile given adequate water and fertilizer.
Brazil's debt to GDP ratio for 1999 beat the IMF target and helped reassure investors that Brazil will maintain tight fiscal and monetary policy even with a floating currency.
The economy continued to recover in 2000, with inflation remaining in the single digits and expected growth for 2001 of 4.5%.
www.mapzones.com /world/south_america/brazil/economyindex.php   (587 words)

  
 Brazil Economy
Brazil's economy, aided by a benign international environment, grew approximately 2.4% in 2005 and 4.9% in 2004.
Brazil is the world's largest producer of sugar cane, coffee, tropical fruits, frozen concentrated orange juice (FCOJ), and has the world's largest commercial cattle herd (50% larger than the U.S.) at 170 million head.
Brazil is one of the world's leading producers of hydroelectric power.
www.traveldocs.com /br/economy.htm   (1311 words)

  
 A2Z Languages ~ Brazil ~ Economy ~ Study Portuguese
Brazil has the largest economy in South America and the ninth largest in the world.
Brazil is the world's largest producer of coffee, oranges, and bananas.
Brazil is a member of Mercosur, a regional free-trade pact that includes Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay.
www.a2zlanguages.com /brazil/brazil_economy.htm   (239 words)

  
 Brazil - The Economy
In the 1940s, only 31.3 percent of Brazil's 41.2 million inhabitants resided in towns and cities; by 1991, of the country's 146.9 million inhabitants 75.5 percent lived in cities, and Brazil had two of the world's largest metropolitan centers--São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro.
The rate of population growth decreased from about 3 percent annually in the 1950s and 1960s to 1.9 percent annually in the 1980-91 period, indicating that Brazil was in a demographic transition.
Most of the poor are concentrated in the rural areas of Brazil's Northeast (Nordeste) Region, or in the country's large cities or metropolitan areas.
countrystudies.us /brazil/55.htm   (596 words)

  
 Brazil (11/06)
Brazil's economy, aided by a benign international environment, grew approximately 2.3% in 2005 and 4.9% in 2004.
Brazil is expected to become a net exporter of oil by the end of 2006 as output from the Campos Basin continues to increase.
Brazil is a charter member of the United Nations and participates in its specialized agencies.
www.state.gov /r/pa/ei/bgn/35640.htm   (4260 words)

  
 rubin roots of brazil's economy
Brazil's stock market is reeling as panicky investors take their money elsewhere.
Officials in Brazil and the United States are now considering whether the bailout will be enough and worrying about the costs of a devaluation.
Elections are crucial to the process, and a functioning economy is a prerequisite to well-being.
www.bu.edu /cura/about/rubinmaterials/rubinrootsofbrazilseconomy.htm   (846 words)

  
 Brazil Economy, Brazil People, Culture, Flag
Brazil's population is made up of a mixture of Native American, European, and African people, which gives rise to an ethnic society in Brazil.
The flag of Brazil is green in colour with a large yellow diamond in the center bearing a blue celestial globe with 27 white five-pointed stars (one for each state and the Federal District) arranged in the same pattern as the night sky over Brazil.
Brazil has been through economic difficulties despite witnessing a growth in its industrial sector.
www.mapsofworld.com /country-profile/brazil1.html   (540 words)

  
 Brazil's Economy: Legal Language Services
Brazil and the United States have the two largest populations and economies in the Western Hemisphere.
Few Americans realize that Brazil is currently the eighth largest economy in the world, and that during the 1990s the opening up of its economy resulted in markedly increased imports.
Brazil's current and potential economic growth indicates that the country will continue to have an increasingly substantial impact on the world economy.
www.legallanguage.com /lawarticles/Marcelo001.html   (319 words)

  
 Brazilian Economy. Basic facts about business, production, products and services.
Brazil's economic history is marked by a succession of cycles, each of them based on the exploitation of a single export commodity.
With the collapse of the slave economy (it was cheaper to pay wages to new immigrants than to maintain slaves), the abolition of slavery in 1888, and the replacement of the monarchy by the republican regime in 1889, Brazil's economy suffered severe disruption.
Brazil is one of the richest countries in the world, as far as natural resources are concerned.
www.brazilbrazil.com /economy.html   (1787 words)

  
 As Brazil Fills Up on Ethanol, It Weans Off Energy Imports
Brazil’s ethanol program, which originated in the 1970s in response to the uncertainties of the oil market, has enjoyed intermittent success.
Brazil ended most government support for its sugar industry in the late 1990s, forcing sugar producers to become more efficient and helping lower the cost of ethanol's raw material.
Brazil is also fortunate that sugar is the cheapest way to make ethanol and Brazil has the right conditions for growing the crop -- plenty of land, rain and cheap labor.
yaleglobal.yale.edu /display.article?id=6817   (2245 words)

  
 BBC News | The Economy | Why Brazil matters
Brazil is the largest economy in Latin America, accounting for almost half of the continent's total output, and it is the eighth largest economy in the world.
If Brazil falls into recession, it is likely to drag the rest of Latin America down with it and that could have serious consequences for world economic growth.
However, Ms Bell believes that the blow to Brazil highlights that the world and the UK are heading for a sharp slowdown.
news.bbc.co.uk /1/low/business/the_economy/254503.stm   (750 words)

  
 TIA - Brazil Travel View 2001 – Economy
In the early 1990s, Brazil experienced a period of hyperinflation that destroyed the value of the currency, as well as investor confidence.
Brazil's GDP per capita was estimated to be USD $3,408 in 1999.
Despite this decline, Brazil was able to maintain its fifth place overseas ranking of international arrivals to the U.S. The recovering economy in 2000 had a favorable effect on Brazilian arrivals to the U.S., which increased 10.9 percent from 1999 to 737,245.
www.tia.org /researchpubs/brazil_travelview_economy.html   (1587 words)

  
 Brazil - Brazzil Magazine
Brazil had a new president for a day on November 13, 2006, a communist called Aldo Rebelo, who is chairman of the House of Representatives.
This was because Brazil's Constitution states that whenever the president and vice president are outside the country the chairman of the Lower House of Congress becomes acting president.
Brazil's giant food company Perdigão announced today that it intends to invest US$ 215 million next year in its Mineiros industrial complex, to be inaugurated in the midwestern Brazilian state...
www.brazzil.com   (3510 words)

  
 Brazil - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Brazil is characterized by the extensive low-lying Amazon Rainforest in the north and a more open terrain of hills and low mountains to the south — home to most of the Brazilian population and its agricultural base.
Although Brazil's economy is progressive and regionally important, the problems of widespread state bureaucracy, corruption, poverty and illiteracy are still major barriers to further its development.
Brazil's population is mostly concentrated along the coast, with a lower population density in the interior.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Brazil   (4561 words)

  
 SICE- ECLAC- Economy of Brazil   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
The Brazilian economy’s performance for 1997 was severely affected by the deepening of the crisis in Asian financial markets in late October.
In deciding to take this step, it was influenced by the prevailing uncertainty regarding the trend in the level of activity in the domestic economy and the trade balance, the need to hold to the planned rate of devaluation and the importance of proceeding cautiously in the face of possible changes in international interest rates.
Striking aspects of Brazil’s lending activity included the increase in bond issues (US$ 17.1 billion worth up to October, which was 46% higher than during the same period of 1996) and the mandatory financing (US$ 19.9 billion) to cover imports.
www.sice.oas.org /geograph/westernh/97/ovbra_e.asp   (1767 words)

  
 Brazil: Economy - K12 Academics
Brazil's debt to GDP ratio of 48% for 1999 beat the IMF target and helped reassure investors that Brazil will maintain tight fiscal and monetary policy even with a floating currency and the economy grew 4.4% in 2000.
After a GDP increase of 0.5% in 2003, Brazil did not show very robust growth in 2004, decreasing to the pace of 2.3% (2005); international economic growth and, consequentially, expansion of exports, no doubt contributed to this performance.
The economy still has serious challenges to face and important reforms are still to be implemented.
www.k12academics.com /brazil_economy.htm   (876 words)

  
 Brazil's Economic Crisis
Cardoso, architect of Brazil's "Plan Real," was to implement structural adjustments and economic reforms designed to satisfy the conditions set by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for a $41.5 billion loan.
This $41.5 billion was deemed more than adequate to bolster Brazil's dollar reserves and protect the real from speculative attack or capital flight, despite a rising current account deficit, budgetary problems, and rising levels of dollar denominated debt in the Brazilian corporate sector.
To the extent the fiscal and structural reforms would enhance profitability in Brazil, particularly in the export sector, the price of capital assets, and related equity shares, could be protected from the sort of financial sector collapse that has recently come to epitomize Asian financial markets.
www.mtholyoke.edu /courses/sgabriel/brazil.htm   (1451 words)

  
 Brazil Economy
Brazil's economy and the social challenges of continental...
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil: Brazilian Finance Minister Antonio Palocci said on Friday Latin America’s largest economy could grow as much as 4 per cent this year but the government is not about to change its 3.5 p...
SAO PAULO, Brazil -- Thousands of Brazilians took to the streets Friday in cities across the country, protesting high unemployment and interest rates despite recent signs that South America's biggest economy is...
archive.wn.com /2004/07/19/1400/brazileconomy   (817 words)

  
 Brazil's Troubled Economy
The recent economic history of Brazil can provide insight into some of the forces driving deforestation and explain the present state of the Brazilian economy at the close of the 20th century.
The effect of Brazil’s economic troubles in 1999-2000 on its tropical rainforests were expected to be mixed.
On one hand, the weak economy means fewer new development projects and less clearing for agriculture.
rainforests.mongabay.com /20brazil_1.htm   (462 words)

  
 Brazil - Economy
Characterized by large and well-developed agricultural, mining, manufacturing, and service sectors, Brazil's economy outweighs that of all other South American countries and is expanding its presence in world markets.
From 2001-03 real wages fell and Brazil's economy grew, on average only 2.2% per year, as the country absorbed a series of domestic and international economic shocks.
That Brazil absorbed these shocks without financial collapse is a tribute to the resiliency of the Brazilian economy and the economic program put in place by former President CARDOSO and strengthened by President LULA DA SILVA.
www.exxun.com /Brazil/e_ec.html   (640 words)

  
 Brazil: Economy
Brazil has one of the world's largest economies, with well-developed agricultural, mining, manufacturing, and service sectors.
The major commercial crops are coffee (Brazil is the world's largest producer and exporter), citrus fruit (especially juice oranges, of which Brazil also is the world's largest producer), soybeans, sugarcane, rice, corn, cocoa, cotton, tobacco, and bananas.
Brazil has vast mineral wealth, including iron ore (it is the world's largest producer), quartz, chrome ore, manganese, industrial diamonds, gem stones, gold, nickel, tin, bauxite, uranium, and platinum.
www.infoplease.com /ce6/world/A0857009.html   (354 words)

  
 Brazil: Model Economy or Model Deadbeat?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
The strongest praise for Brazil came literally when the checks were being written to forestall the country's bankruptcy.
Endlessly raging inflation in a country with Brazil's huge rich-poor gap is a recipe for revolution or chaos.
And like the Argentine gimmick, Brazil's helped to permit enough ordinary Brazilians to live beyond their means to preserve political stability while avoiding the kinds of social and economic reforms that would have threatened wealthy elites.
www.americaneconomicalert.org /view_art.asp?Prod_ID=601   (1204 words)

  
 Brazil Post (via CobWeb/3.1 planetlab1.isi.jhu.edu)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
Associated Press SAO PAULO, Brazil - A major Brazilian fashion event has moved to bar models under the age of 16, part of a national effort to increase awareness about eating disorders following the...
BRASILIA, Brazil: Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez said that he and his Brazilian counterpart Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva will discuss a proposed South American...
SAO PAULO, Brazil (AP) - Authorities lifted a ban on takeoffs from three major Brazilian airports Wednesday morning after fixing an air traffic communications system that...
www.brazilia.com.cob-web.org:8888   (627 words)

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