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Topic: Economy of Indonesia


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In the News (Thu 14 Dec 17)

  
  Indonesia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
East Timor was a province of Indonesia from its annexation in 1976 until Indonesia relinquished sovereignty in 1999.
Indonesia's economy suffered greatly in the late 1990s, in part as a result of the financial crisis that struck most of Asia at the time.
Indonesia's major trading partners are Japan, the United States and the surrounding nations of Singapore, Malaysia and Australia.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Indonesia   (1903 words)

  
 Economy of Indonesia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Indonesia's initial response was to float the rupiah, raise key domestic interest rates, and tighten fiscal policy.
Although a severe drought in 1997–1998 forced Indonesia to import record amounts of rice, overall imports dropped precipitously in the early stage of the crisis in response to the unfavorable exchange rate, reduced domestic demand, and absence of new investment.
Indonesia is the only Asian member of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) outside of the Middle East, and is the only OPEC member that is a net oil importer.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Economy_of_Indonesia   (1684 words)

  
 EH.Net Encyclopedia: The Economic History of Indonesia
Indonesia has a tropical climate, but since there are large stretches of lowland and numerous mountainous areas, the climate varies from hot and humid to more moderate in the highlands.
The economic history of Indonesia analyzes a range of topics, varying from the characteristics of the dynamic exports of raw materials, the dualist economy in which both Western and Indonesian entrepreneurs participated, and the strong measure of regional variation in the economy.
Indonesia is such a large and multi-faceted country that many different aspects have been the focus of research (for example, ethnic groups, trade networks, shipping, colonialism and imperialism).
eh.net /encyclopedia/article/touwen.indonesia   (4656 words)

  
 Indonesia Economy
Indonesia's overall macroeconomic picture is stable and improving, although GDP growth rates have not yet returned to pre-crisis levels.
Indonesia’s 4th quarter 2004 GDP growth was 6.1%, its highest level since the 1997-98 financial crisis, and full year growth in 2004 was 5.1%.
Indonesia's exports grew to a record $69.7 billion in 2004, an increase of 11.49% from 2003.
www.traveldocs.com /id/economy.htm   (2137 words)

  
 Indonesia (05/05)
Indonesia’s first elections in the post-Soeharto period were held for the national, provincial, and sub-provincial parliaments on June 7, 1999.
The embassy of Indonesia is at 2020 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20036 (tel.
Indonesia has the world's largest Muslim population, though it is a secular state, and is a member of the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC).
www.state.gov /r/pa/ei/bgn/2748.htm   (7297 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Indonesia : Economy (Southeast Asia Political Geography) - Encyclopedia
Indonesia is one of the world's major rubber producers; other plantation crops include sugarcane, coffee, tea, tobacco, palm oil, cinchona, cloves, cocoa, sisal, coconuts, and spices.
Indonesia is a major exporter of timber, accounting for nearly half of the world's tropical hardwood trade.
The country's economy was severely impacted by the 1997–98 Asian financial crisis and it continues to experience high unemployment and inflation, although the nation began to rebound in 2000.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/I/Indonesi-economy.html   (527 words)

  
 Economy - Indonesia - Asia
Indonesia’s economy grew impressively during the 1980s and much of the 1990s, largely on the strength of its natural resources, which include a large population, solid energy reserves, substantial mineral deposits, and fertile farmland.
As the crisis spread to Indonesia, the value of the Indonesian currency plummeted, which threatened the capacity of the government, banks, and businesses to repay their foreign debts.
Indonesia was more seriously affected by the Asian economic crisis than were its neighbors.
www.countriesquest.com /asia/indonesia/economy.htm   (454 words)

  
 Indonesia's Economy
Indonesia's total exports in fiscal year 1997/98 was US$ 56.2 billion, growing only 7.9% compared to that of the previous fiscal year.
Indonesia's total external debt outstanding at the end of March 1998 was US$138.018 billion up from US$108.7 billion at the end of March 1997.
Bank Indonesia is also in charge of preparing and implementing the monetary policy under the direction of the Economic Stabilization Council, a government advisory body presided over by the President.
www.asianinfo.org /asianinfo/indonesia/pro-economy.htm   (3961 words)

  
 An Overview of Indonesia
Indonesia is the fourth most populous nation in the world after China, India and the United States.
Indonesia is divided into 30 provinces, which include 2 special regions and 1 special capital city district which are further sub-divided into smaller entities of districts, sub-districts, villages and neighborhoods.
Indonesia is a republic with political power organized around the executive, legislative and judicial branches of government.
www.expat.or.id /info/overview.html   (1538 words)

  
 Indonesia: Recovery Economy at a Crossroads
Indonesia's real GDP growth accelerated in 2000 to a 4.8 percent rate based on a 27-percent surge in exports and more measured increases in consumption and investment.
Despite Indonesia's stronger than expected economic performance in 2000, a steady drumbeat of negative economic and political developments in the second half of the year has led most private forecasters to reduce their forecast for GDP growth in 2001 to the 3-4 percent range.
Indonesia faces a score of medium- and long-term economic problems ranging from implementing regional autonomy to improving the technological mix of the country's exports.
www.usembassyjakarta.org /econ/crossroad.html   (2954 words)

  
 Indonesia -> Economy on Encyclopedia.com 2002   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
The country's economy was severely impacted by the 1997-98 Asian financial crisis and it continues to experience high unemployment and inflation, although the nation began to rebound in 2000.
Indonesia's economy: conglomerates, the Soeharto family and free trade.
Gas is the challenge for Indonesia: David Hayes reports on how parts of Indonesia's urea industry are facing a growing scarcity of affordable natural gas feedstock as local demand for gas continues to rise and...
www.encyclopedia.com /html/section/Indonesi_Economy.asp   (908 words)

  
 Indonesia Report: Economy
Indonesia adopts an open economic system, where three groups of economic actors are expected to play significant roles in developing national economy in a balanced manner.
Cooperative is expected to play as a main pillar for the national economy as this directly deals with most of the Indonesian people, from urban to the remotest rural areas.
The economy of Indonesia is undergoing rapid diversification to minimize its dependency on oil and gas exports, which used to be the major source of foreign exchange.
www.indonext.com /report/report151.html   (640 words)

  
 Indonesia - Economic analysis of government's policies, investment climate and political risk.
And, since Indonesia is the largest country in the South East Asia in term of land and population, no neighbor countries in the region dare to interfere openly in the Indonesian government's policy making.
Indonesia is the largest archipelago in the world, consisting of more than 17,000 islands stretching 3,200 miles from east to west along the equatorial zone between the continents of Asia and Australia.
Indonesia's military forces remain fairly capable, but are rapidly aging and insufficient for the nation's demands.
www.mkeever.com /indonesia.html   (5046 words)

  
 [No title]
Indonesia’s major resources, major imports and exports, types of transportation, and Indonesia’s level of technology, which will also be compared to that of the United States’.
Indonesia is one of the most populated countries in the world.
Transportation is difficult in much of Indonesia because of the thick forests and rugged mountains, and the wide stretches of sea that separates the islands.
www.ri.net /schools/East_Greenwich/Cole/indonesiaeconomy.html   (780 words)

  
 Economy of Indonesia -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
The legal system was very weak, and there was and is no effective way to enforce contracts, collect debts, or sue for (A legal process intended to insure equality among the creditors of a corporation declared in bankruptcy) bankruptcy.
Indonesia, the only Asian member of the (Click link for more info and facts about Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries) Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), ranks 15th among world oil producers, with about 2.4% of world production.
The 2000 CGI meeting is to be held October 17-18 in (The capital and largest city of Japan; the economic and cultural center of Japan) Tokyo.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/e/ec/economy_of_indonesia.htm   (1813 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Economy of Indonesia Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
During the 30 years of president Suharto's "New Order" government, Indonesia's economy grew from a per capita GDP of $7070 to more than $1,000 by 1996.
Although a severe drought in 1997-1998 forced Indonesia to import record amounts of rice, overall imports dropped precipitously in the early stage of the crisis in response to the unfavorable exchange rate, reduced domestic demand, and absence of new investment.
Indonesia's public sector external debt rose from $54.2 billion in March 1998 to about $80 billion by mid-2000.
www.ipedia.com /economy_of_indonesia.html   (1921 words)

  
 economy of indonesia and other indonesia related information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Economy Of Indonesia, Indonesia Economy, Tsunami impact on Indonesia Economy, Indonesian Economy Overview, Indonesian Economic Profile, Economic Profiles Of Countries, Economic Profiles Of Indonesia...
Economy Indonesia Table of Contents BY MANY MEASURES, the Indonesian economy prospered under the New Order of President Suharto after he came to power in 1966; growing industries added...
Economy of Indonesia Indonesia's economy suffered greatly in the late 1990s, in part as a result of the financial crisis that struck most of Asia at the time.
www.nethorde.com /indonesia/economy-of-indonesia.html   (342 words)

  
 Economy of Indonesia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Through prudent monetary and fiscal policies, inflation was held in the 5%-10% range, the rupiah was stable and predictable, and the government avoided domestic financing of budget deficits.
In October 1997, Indonesia and the International Monetary fund (IMF) reached agreement on an economic reform program aimed at macroeconomic stabilization and elimination of some of the country's most damaging economic policies, such as the National Car Program and the clove monopoly, both involving family members of President Soeharto.
Although a severe drought in 1997-98 forced Indonesia to import record amounts of rice, overall imports dropped precipitously in the early stage of the crisis in response to the unfavorable exchange rate, reduced domestic demand, and absence of new investment.
www.portaljuice.com /economy_of_indonesia.html   (1825 words)

  
 Indonesia Country Analysis Brief   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Indonesia has 5.9 billion short tons of recoverable coal reserves, of which 58.6% is lignite, 26.6% is sub-bituminous, 14.4% is bituminous, and 0.4% anthracite.
Indonesia's carbon emissions remain low, but there is concern that an increase in the use of indigenous coal will increase Indonesia's carbon emissions in the coming years.
Indonesia is also phasing out the use of leaded gasoline, with a complete ban set to come into force in 2005.
www.eia.doe.gov /emeu/cabs/indonesa.html   (4176 words)

  
 The Daily Star Web Edition Vol. 4 Num 272   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Sukarno was a populist, the founder of modern Indonesia and of the non-aligned movement of developing countries, which he hoped would forge a genuine third way between the spheres of two superpowers.
It was the first time the leaders of the non-aligned countries, the majority of humanity, had met to forge a bond on common interests: a prospect that alarmed the western powers, especially the vision and idealism of non-alignment represented a potentially popular force that might seriously challenge neocolonialism.
In 1996, as a member of a Bangladesh delegation, I had the opportunity to visit Indonesia and watch the faded tableaux and fl-and-white photographs in the museum at Bandung and in the forecourt of the splendid art deco of Savoy Hotel where Bandung principles were displayed.
www.thedailystar.net /2004/03/04/d40304020330.htm   (1465 words)

  
 Economy Of Indonesia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
If you would like to use this flag of Indonesia or any other on your website you are welcome to do so, all we ask is that you include a link back to our site on the same page.
If you would like to use this map of Indonesia or any other on your website you are welcome to do so, all we ask is that you include a link back to our site on the same page.
If you would like to use this information for Indonesia or any other on your website you are welcome to do so, all we ask is that you include a link back to our site on the same page.
www.appliedlanguage.com /country_guides/indonesia_country_economy.shtml   (472 words)

  
 Asia Economy Watch » Indonesia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Japanese investors were also influenced by higher estimates of inflation and lowered economic growth forecasts in the US as well as by anticipation over Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan’s upcoming remarks in front of a Congressional committee.
In an attempt to avoid inflation, it was announced Tuesday by Indonesia’s central bank that it would raise interest rates in order to shore up its currency, which hit a three-year low earlier in the week.
Indonesia’s economy grew by 5.1 percent last year and has been projected to grow by 5.5 to 6 percent this year, but the devaluation of the rupiah and rising inflation are a threat to that growth.
asiaeconomywatch.co.uk /category/countries/indonesia   (407 words)

  
 Economy (from Indonesia) --  Britannica Student Encyclopedia
More results on "Economy (from Indonesia)" when you join.
(Single names are quite common in Indonesia.) As president he headed a mismanaged and corrupt administration that virtually destroyed the government and economy of Indonesia.
See why the economy of Indonesia is a model for developing countries.
www.britannica.com /ebi/article-202587?tocId=202587&ct=   (827 words)

  
 Indonesia - Economy
Indonesia, a vast polyglot nation, has restored financial stability and pursued sober fiscal policies since the Asian financial crisis, but many economic development problems remain, including high unemployment, a fragile banking sector, endemic corruption, inadequate infrastructure, a poor investment climate, and unequal resource distribution among regions.
Indonesia became a net oil importer in 2004 due to declining production and lack of new exploration investment.
As a result, Jakarta is not reaping the benefits of high world oil prices, and the cost of subsidizing domestic fuel prices has placed an increasing strain on the budget.
www.exxun.com /Indonesia/e_ec.html   (541 words)

  
 Government & Economy - Indonesia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Indonesia is a republic ruled by the military under General Raden Suharto.
After taking over from Sukarno, Suharto swiftly re-established links with the west in order to improve the economy especially through increased exploitation of Indonesia resources.
The Indonesia government has promoted a state idealogy consisting of 5 principles.
www.regit.com /regitour/indonesi/about/governme.htm   (211 words)

  
 Indonesia - Economy
Indonesia, a vast polyglot nation, faces economic development problems stemming from recent acts of terrorism, unequal resource distribution among regions, endemic corruption, the lack of reliable legal recourse in contract disputes, weaknesses in the banking system, and a generally poor climate for foreign investment.
Indonesia withdrew from its IMF program at the end of 2003, but issued a "White Paper" that commits the government to maintaining fundamentally sound macroeconomic policies previously established under IMF guidelines.
$43 billion Indonesia finished its IMF program in December 2003 but still receives bilateral aid through the Consultative Group on Indonesia (CGI), which pledged $2.8 billion in grants and loans for 2004.
www.classbrain.com /art_cr/publish/printer_indonesia_economy.shtml   (275 words)

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