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Topic: Economy of Somalia


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 Somalia (11/07)
Somalia's modern history began in the late 19th century, when various European powers began to trade and establish themselves in the area.
The SRC became increasingly radical in foreign affairs, and in 1974, Somalia and the Soviet Union concluded a treaty of friendship and cooperation.
Following the overthrow of the Ethiopian Emperor in 1975, Somalia invaded Ethiopia in 1977 in a second attempt to regain the Ogaden, and the second attempt initially appeared to be in Somalia's favor.
www.state.gov /r/pa/ei/bgn/2863.htm   (5140 words)

  
  Economy - Somalia - Africa
The economy of Somalia is based primarily on livestock raising.
Efforts to diversify and modernize the economy were directed by the government through a series of development plans, extensively assisted by foreign grants and loans.
In the early 1990s, with the Somalian economy in a state of collapse because of the civil war, the GNP had fallen to $36 per capita.
www.countriesquest.com /africa/somalia/economy.htm   (86 words)

  
 Somalia - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
Somalia (Somali: Soomaaliya; Arabic: الصومال, As-Suumaal), formerly known as the Somali Democratic Republic, is a coastal nation at the Horn of Africa in East Africa.
Somalia is located on the east coast of Africa on and north of the Equator between the Gulf of Aden on the north and Indian Ocean on the east.
Somalia continues to have one of the highest child mortality rates in the world, with 10% of children dying at birth and 25% of those surviving birth dying before age five.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Somalia   (2963 words)

  
 Somalia ECONOMY
Somalia's economy, one of the poorest in the world, is an agricultural one based primarily on livestock and, to a lesser extent, on farming.
The aid, together with good rains and increased stability, helped ease the food situation and few communities were at risk of widespread famine in 1997; however, the lack of rains in spring 2001 caused major food shortages in the south of the country.
Although Somalia was largely still in a state of anarchy in 2003, despite ongoing peace talks, the telecommunications sector was functioning, with most major cities having wireless telephone services.
www.nationsencyclopedia.com /Africa/Somalia-ECONOMY.html   (288 words)

  
 Economy of Somalia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Its economy is pastoral and agricultural, with livestock — principally camels, cattle, sheep, and goats — representing the main form of wealth.
The modern sector of the agricultural economy consists mainly of banana plantations located in the south, which have used modern irrigation systems and up-to-date farm machinery.
Somalia • South Africa • Sudan • Swaziland • Tanzania • Togo • Tunisia • Uganda • Western Sahara
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Economy_of_Somalia   (1019 words)

  
 Somalia - ECONOMY
The sugar economy differed from the banana and cotton economies in two respects: sugar was raised for domestic consumption, and a single firm, the Italo-Somali Agricultural Society (Societa Agricola Italo-Somala--SAIS), headquartered in Genoa, controlled the sector.
At independence the Somali economy was at a near subsistence level, and the new state lacked the administrative capacity to collect taxes from subsistence herders and farmers.
Somalia was an exporter of labor to other members of the League of Arab States (Arab League), and Somali citizens received remittances from these workers.
www.mongabay.com /reference/country_studies/somalia/ECONOMY.html   (8414 words)

  
 Somalia - MSN Encarta
Before Somalia’s government collapsed in 1991, education was free and compulsory for children between the ages of 6 and 13.
As a result of Somalia’s civil war, the educational system collapsed and most schools closed, including the Somali National University in Mogadishu, which had an enrollment of about 4,600 prior to the war.
Livestock raising is the principal occupation in Somalia.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761554555_3/Somalia.html   (420 words)

  
 Somalia Economy Profile 2006
Somalia's economic fortunes are driven by its deep political divisions.
The northwestern area has declared its independence as the "Republic of Somaliland"; the northeastern region of Puntland is a semi-autonomous state; and the remaining southern portion is riddled with the struggles of rival factions.
Somalia's small industrial sector, based on the processing of agricultural products, has largely been looted and sold as scrap metal.
www.indexmundi.com /somalia/economy_profile.html   (424 words)

  
 Somalia - Economy
The economy is heavily dependent on agriculture, which is subject to the vagaries of periodic droughts.
During the course of the last few years a pattern of stability emerged as peace spread slowly throughout the country, but by late 2001Somalia was considered to be on the edge of unprecedented, total economic collapse.
As there is no government in Somalia, and the administration in Somaliland has yet to be internationally recognised, relations with creditors have been frozen throughout the 1990s.
www.iss.co.za /Af/profiles/Somalia/Economy.html   (570 words)

  
 Somalia - Economy
The economy is heavily dependent on agriculture, which is subject to the vagaries of periodic droughts.
During the course of the last few years a pattern of stability emerged as peace spread slowly throughout the country, but by late 2001Somalia was considered to be on the edge of unprecedented, total economic collapse.
As there is no government in Somalia, and the administration in Somaliland has yet to be internationally recognised, relations with creditors have been frozen throughout the 1990s.
www.iss.org.za /AF/profiles/somalia/Economy.html   (570 words)

  
 Class politicts in Somalia... Alex de waal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
By the 1980s, analyses of the survival of the Somali economy, and its perplexing prosperity in certain sectors, concluded that a huge unrecorded inflow of remittances was a key, if unrecognised, economic factor.
In the case of Somalia, the accumulation strategy of the elite in power in the 1980s was rent-seeking taken to an extreme.
Somalia is normally described as a ‘clan society’ and the classic anthropological texts (echoed in state propaganda from Independence to 1991) have ascribed an almost fatalistic clan identification to Somalis.
www.somaliawatch.org /archivejun02/021015201.htm   (0 words)

  
 Somalia
The inability of the international community to respond quickly to Somalia’s mass famine and internecine warfare in the early 1990s (which followed the collapse of a U.S.-backed military dictatorship) is often cited by U.S. critics of the UN.
Somalia, divided during colonialism between Britain and Italy, won independence as a unified nation in 1960.
Somalia’s strategic location as a cold war pawn helped fuel the country’s economic collapse and the civil war, and has continued to dictate Washington’s poorly executed responses.
www.fpif.org /briefs/vol2/v2n19som_body.html   (2285 words)

  
 somalia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Somalia’s economy is crippled by civil war, destruction of physical infrastructure, lack of investment and rampant unemployment.
It remains an economy in which the short-term and uncontrolled interests of a few and pressure of the population struggling to extract a living from marginal lands and coastal waters have led to widespread poverty and environmental degradation.
More often, as was the case in Somalia, strong and well connected interest groups within the system establish themselves and resist any dialogue with other groups and try to manipulate the government policy for their continued advantage at the expense of the majority of the population.
magnet.undp.org /Docs/gov/arab/Somalia.htm   (5450 words)

  
 Somalia Economy
Somalia lacks natural resources and faces major development challenges, and recent economic reverses have left its people increasingly dependent on remittances from abroad.
The agricultural sector of the economy consists mainly of banana plantations located in the south, which has used modern irrigation systems and up-to-date farm machinery.
Somalia’s surprisingly innovative private sector has continued to function despite the lack of a functioning central government since 1991.
www.traveldocs.com /so/economy.htm   (764 words)

  
 : SomaliNet > Somali > Somalia and Somalinad
: SomaliNet > Somali > Somalia and Somalinad
The Ogaden War of 1977-78 between Somalia and Ethiopia and the consequent refugee influx forced Somalia to depend for its economic survival on humanitarian handouts (see The Ogaden War: Performance and Implications of Defeat, ch.
Specifically, Somalia was urged to create a free market system and to devalue the Somali shilling (for value of the shilling--see Glossary) so that its official rate would reflect its true value (see From Scientific Socialism to "IMF-ism," 1981-90, ch.
somalinet.com /library/somalia/?so=0038   (1296 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Over the first five years, the Somali government did not fully accept the tighter demands imposed by the IMF and by 1984, with the Saudi ban on Somali meat imports and the drought, the country was in dire straits.
In the late 1990's, the people of Somalia are no longer on the verge of starvation, but the country's economic prospect remains insecure.
Somalia lacks the necessary characteristics of a modern economy; the small industrial sector closed down in the early 1990s due to civil war and many businesses remained closed.
www.arab.net /somalia/so_economy.htm   (344 words)

  
 Somalia
The Ogaden War of 1977-78 between Somalia and Ethiopia and the consequent refugee influx forced Somalia to depend for its economic survival on humanitarian handouts.
On June 7, 1982, apparently wishing to prove that he alone ruled Somalia, ordered the arrest of seventeen prominent politicians thus creating an atmosphere of fear, and alienating the Isaaq, Majeerteen, and Hawiye clans, whose disaffection and consequent armed resistance were to lead to the toppling of the Siad Barre regime.
The regime's insecurity was considerably increased by repeated forays across the Somali border in the Mudug (central) and Boorama (northwest) areas by a combination of Somali dissidents and Ethiopian army units.
www.globalsecurity.org /military/world/somalia/background.htm   (2694 words)

  
 Open Doors USA   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Somalia is one of the world’s poorest and least developed nations.
Somalia is one of the most lawless countries in the world.
Somalia has been in a state of civil war and anarchy since 1991 when the central government was overthrown.
www.opendoorsusa.org /Display.asp?Page=SomaliaProfile   (464 words)

  
 Open Doors USA   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Somalia is one of the world’s poorest and least developed nations.
Somalia is one of the most lawless countries in the world.
Somalia has been in a state of civil war and anarchy since 1991 when the central government was overthrown.
www.odusa.org /Display.asp?Page=SomaliaProfile   (0 words)

  
 Economy and GDP of Somalia
Somalia's economic fortunes are being driven by its deep political divisions.
The northern area has declared its independence as "Somaliland"; the central area, Puntland, is a self-declared autonomous state; and the remaining southern portion is riddled with the struggles of rival factions.
In 2002 Somalia's overdue financial obligations to the IMF continued to grow.
www.joinafrica.com /countries1/Somalia/economy.htm   (446 words)

  
 ECONOMY OF SOMALIA : Encyclopedia Entry
Somalia has meager natural resources (or untapped resources such as Oil) and recent economic reverses has left its people increasingly dependent on remittances from abroad.
As of January 2007, Somalia is still a fragile state with hundreds of thousands of refugees due to massive floods and the latest fighting of the civil war.
GDP per capita of Somalia grew 37% in the 1960s, dropped to just 6% in the 1970s and recovered to 37% growth in the 1980s.
www.bibleocean.com /OmniDefinition/Economy_of_Somalia   (1903 words)

  
 Worldworx Travel - Safety - Africa - Somalia
Somalia is a developing country in the Horn of Africa.
Somalia 's economy was seriously damaged by the civil war and its aftermath, but the private sector is trying to reemerge.
Additionally, there have been recent threats against Westerners in Somalia, including Somaliland, and all visitors are urged to restrict their movements in the region.
www.worldworx.tv /safety/africa/somalia/index.htm   (632 words)

  
 Somalia travel guide
Somalia is bounded on the north by the Gulf of Aden, on the east and south by the Indian Ocean, on the southwest by Kenya, on the west by Ethiopia, and on the northwest by Djibouti.
Somalia has a long coastline, extending for about 3025 km (about 1880 mi), but it has few natural harbors.
The climate of Somalia ranges from tropical to subtropical and from arid to semiarid.
www.world66.com /africa/somalia   (587 words)

  
 Somalia - Land and Economy
Somalia is geographically divided into northern desert and southern coastal plains and plateaus.
About 70 percent of all Somalis are nomads who travel with their herds through Somalia, Kenya, and Ethiopia.
Drought from 1978 to 1981 and again from the mid-1980s, plus the huge regional refugee population created by civil wars in Somalia and Ethiopia, devastated the economy.
home.vicnet.net.au /~somalia/land.htm   (398 words)

  
 Economy Of Somalia
If you would like to use this flag of Somalia or any other on your website you are welcome to do so, all we ask is that you include a link back to our site on the same page.
If you would like to use this map of Somalia or any other on your website you are welcome to do so, all we ask is that you include a link back to our site on the same page.
If you would like to use this information for Somalia or any other on your website you are welcome to do so, all we ask is that you include a link back to our site on the same page.
www.appliedlanguage.com /country_guides/somalia_country_economy.shtml   (637 words)

  
 The Economy of Somalia
Since Somalia and Ethiopia ended their wars of liberation in 1991, but Ethiopia has had a functional democratic government since then whereas Somalia has had no national government since then, why is it that the Somali economy has recovered so strongly despite lack of a national government?
The reason is that they require investments by the nomads in specific tracts of land, rather than to retain the traditional freedom to move to the tracts of land where rain has actually fallen.
Therefore, the Somali people need to develop a capability for doing their own analysis for such projects, whereby the analysis is not connected with or integrated with the potentially profit-generating projects, which could distort the long-term analysis and recommendations.
www.somalishir.org /economy/economy_of_somalia.htm   (3394 words)

  
 Somalia
Somalia is an African country that exists solely in a de jure capacity.
Somalia has no recognized central government authority, president, national currency, or any other feature associated with a well-established nation state.
Authority is in the hands of small groups of rival warlords who lead small opposing governments.
www.fastload.org /so/Somalia.html   (106 words)

  
 Somalia Finds Many Cash In on Chaos
Now a major point of entry for goods into Somalia, Bossaso has been targeted by the United Nations as a place worth cleaning up because it's the region's biggest potential source of income.
In Somalia, there was almost no history of state institutions before Siad Barre seized power in 1969.
Roland Marchal, a researcher from Paris's Center d'tudes et de Recherches Internationales, says that Somalia's "free" economy often means that traders from weaker clans are prohibited from competing with traders from the strongest clans.
www.netnomad.com /csm.html   (960 words)

  
 Somalia Business Travel Guide   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Somalia's economy has been seriously dislocated by years of fighting and political strife, as well as a severe long-term drought which has affected the whole of East Africa.
Subsistence agriculture and livestock rearing occupy most of the working population, although development is hampered by primitive techniques, poor soil and climatic conditions, and a chronic labour shortage.
Somalia is burdened by a huge foreign debt and its traditional trade relationships have largely been suspended due to payment problems.
www.worldtravelguide.net /country/254/business/Africa/Somalia.html   (0 words)

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