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Topic: Economy of Syria


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In the News (Sun 18 Aug 19)

  
  Syria Economy
Syria's exchange rate is fixed, and the government maintains two official rates -- one rate on which the budget and the value of imports, customs, and other official transactions are based, and a second set by the Central Bank on a daily basis that covers all other financial transactions.
Syria has a population of approximately 19 million people, and Syrian Government figures place the population growth rate at 2.45%, with 75% of the population under the age of 35 and more than 40% under the age of 15.
Syria’s military remains one of the largest in the region, although the breakup of the Soviet Union--long the principal source of training, material, and credit for the Syrian forces--slowed Syria's ability to acquire modern military equipment.
www.traveldocs.com /sy/economy.htm   (1277 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Economy of Syria
Economy - overview: Syria's predominantly statist economy is on a shaky footing because of Damascus's failure to implement extensive economic reform.
Although Syria has sufficient water supplies in the aggregate at normal levels of precipitation, the great distance between major water supplies and population centers poses serious distribution problems.
Syria's inadequate infrastructure, outmoded technological base, and weak educational system make it vulnerable to future shocks and hamper competition with neighbors such as Jordan and Israel.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/ec/Economy_of_Syria   (350 words)

  
 SyrianMall.com - Tourist Info About Syria economy in syria,Syrian industry,Syrian exports, Syrian imports,photos and ...
Syria's economy has undergone a profound transformation since the 1960s.
Syria is not a major petroleum producer by Middle East standards.
Syria also has large phosphate deposits, which are used in its growing fertilizer industry.
www.syrianmall.com /economy.php   (401 words)

  
  netwmd - Syria’s Fragile Economy
Syria’s GDP is highly dependent on the oil and agricultural sectors, both subject to uncertainties, being affected by sharp fluctuations in oil prices and rainfall, respectively.
According to the 2005 study of the Syrian economy by the IMF referred to earlier, the decline in Syrian oil exports is expected to cause a major fiscal and balance-of-payment shock.
Syria’s authoritarian regime, heavily regulated economy, inadequate infrastructure, outmoded technological base, a blotted public sector, and weak economic institutions combined with declining oil revenues, make the country vulnerable to future shocks while hampering its ability to compete at the regional and international levels.
netwmd.com /blog/2007/06/11/1766   (6681 words)

  
  Syria ECONOMY
Despite repeated announcements of economic reforms, Syria's economy continues to be dominated by the state with the government budget acting as the principle tool for managing the economy.
Statistics on the Syrian economy are subject to government manipulation and revision, and may be inaccurate and inconsistent.
Traditionally, Syria is an agricultural economy, and by 2001 estimates, this sector accounted for 40% of the labor force and 27% of the GDP.
www.nationsencyclopedia.com /Asia-and-Oceania/Syria-ECONOMY.html   (528 words)

  
 Syrian Economy
The Syrian economy is in the beginning stages of a transformation period.
It is estimated that the economy grew by 5.8% in 1995 and will continue to grow at this healthy rate into 1997 and beyond.
Syria is primarily an agricultural country, and most workers engage in crop farming or herding for a livelihood.
www.cafe-syria.com /Economy.htm   (505 words)

  
 Syria - Wikinfo
Syria has been the cradle of some of the world's oldest civilizations, and has been part of the Hittite, Assyrian, Babylonian, Egyptian, Persian, Greek and Phoenician empires, before becoming part of the (Eastern) Roman Empire.
With the expansion of Islam in the Middle East in the 7th century, Syria became one of the centres of the new religion.
Syria consists mostly of arid plateau, although there is a small strip with plain along the coast line with the Mediterranean.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Syria   (2044 words)

  
 Syria: Economy
Syria is by many respects a poor country, and relies heavily on help from rich Arab states.
Syria' production is large enough to allow exports, and the income here is now larger than for any other commodity.
Syria's main export crops are wheat and barley, and cotton.
i-cias.com /e.o/syria_2.htm   (574 words)

  
 Trade and Finance: Syria's Troubled Economy
Before the big oil finds in the Middle East, Syria was one of the few countries in the region with the economic potential to develop into a modern industrialized nation capable of insuring a rising standard of living for its people.
Western diplomats in Syria report, however, that meaningful economic reforms are unlikely, since President Assad seems determined not to move away from the strict socialist economic models introduced when the Ba'ath Party assumed power in 1963.
Syria presently is nearing the end of its 1981-85 development plan and the Government has initiated work on the new 1986-90 plan.
www.washington-report.org /backissues/090985/850909007.htm   (1233 words)

  
 Syria: Economy
Syria is by many respects a poor country, and relies heavily on help from rich Arab states.
Syria' production is large enough to allow exports, and the income here is now larger than for any other commodity.
Syria's main export crops are wheat and barley, and cotton.
www.lexicorient.com /e.o/syria_2.htm   (574 words)

  
 Syria: Economy
Syria is by many respects a poor country, and relies heavily on help from rich Arab states.
Syria' production is large enough to allow exports, and the income here is now larger than for any other commodity.
Syria's main export crops are wheat and barley, and cotton.
lexicorient.com /e.o/syria_2.htm   (574 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Syria - The Economy | Syrian Information Resource
Syria's predominantly rural population, working under land tenure and sharecropping arrangements, derived few benefits from the agriculturally induced economic growth of the 1950s.
However, Syria's union with Egypt (1958-61) and the rise of the Baath Party as the major political force in the country in the 1960s, transformed Syria's economic orientation and development strategy.
Syria, as a front-line state in the Arab-Israeli conflict, was also vulnerable to the vagaries of Middle East politics, relying on Arab aid transfers and Soviet assistance to support mounting defense expenditures.
reference.allrefer.com /country-guide-study/syria/syria53.html   (705 words)

  
 globalEDGE (TM) | country insights - Economy of Syria   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Syria exported roughly 195,000 bpd in 2004, and oil still accounts for a majority of the country's export income.
Syria has a population of approximately 18 million people, and official figures place the population growth rate at 2.58%, with 75% of the population under the age of 35 and more than 40% under the age of 15.
Syria has made progress in easing its heavy foreign debt burden through bilateral rescheduling deals with the majority of its key creditors in Europe, most importantly Germany and France.
globaledge.msu.edu /IBRD/CountryEconomy.asp?CountryID=173&RegionID=3   (1053 words)

  
 Syria Debt.
The Syrian economy was shaped on the ruling economy of the former Soviet Union.
Syria's predominantly statist economy is on a shaky footing because of Damascus's failure to implement extensive economic reform.
Syria's inadequate infrastructure, outmoded technological base, and weak educational system make it vulnerable to future shocks and hamper competition with neighbors such as Jordan and Israel.
www.east-west.be /syria.html   (444 words)

  
 Economy Of Syria
If you would like to use this flag of Syria or any other on your website you are welcome to do so, all we ask is that you include a link back to our site on the same page.
If you would like to use this map of Syria or any other on your website you are welcome to do so, all we ask is that you include a link back to our site on the same page.
If you would like to use this information for Syria or any other on your website you are welcome to do so, all we ask is that you include a link back to our site on the same page.
www.appliedlanguage.com /country_guides/syria_country_economy.shtml   (425 words)

  
 Syria - The Economy
Syria's predominantly rural population, working under land tenure and sharecropping arrangements, derived few benefits from the agriculturally induced economic growth of the 1950s.
However, Syria's union with Egypt (1958-61) and the rise of the Baath Party as the major political force in the country in the 1960s, transformed Syria's economic orientation and development strategy.
Syria, as a front-line state in the Arab-Israeli conflict, was also vulnerable to the vagaries of Middle East politics, relying on Arab aid transfers and Soviet assistance to support mounting defense expenditures.
countrystudies.us /syria/39.htm   (569 words)

  
 MEMRI:
Syria's economy, which is predominantly state-controlled, was characterized in a recent report by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) as "stable but stagnant economy" [1] because of the failure of the narrowly confined political establishment to implement extensive economic reforms.
Syria has also pursued a number of initiatives with the Iraqi government to re-supply it with Iraqi crude oil which was interrupted after the invasion of Iraq.
Syria's authoritarian regime, heavily regulated economy, inadequate infrastructure, outmoded technological base, a bloated public sector, and weak economic institutions, combined with declining oil revenues, make the country vulnerable to future shocks while hampering its ability to compete at the regional and international levels.
www.memri.org /bin/opener_latest.cgi?ID=IA34307   (6391 words)

  
 Inquiry and Analysis Series - No. 259
Syria's economy, which is predominantly state-controlled, has been relatively stagnant in recent years because of the failure of the narrowly-confined political establishment to implement extensive economic reforms.
Syria's biggest accomplishment was in the agricultural sector, to which the government has redirected its priorities from the industrial sector.
Syria is suffering today from deforestation, overgrazing, soil erosion, desertification, water pollution from raw sewage and petroleum refining wastes, and inadequate potable water.
memri.org /bin/articles.cgi?Page=countries&Area=syria&ID=IA25906   (3879 words)

  
 Syria's Fragile Economy
Syria's GDP is highly dependent on the oil and agricultural sectors, both subject to uncertainties, being affected by sharp fluctuations in oil prices and rainfall, respectively.
According to the 2005 study of the Syrian economy by the IMF referred to earlier, the decline in Syrian oil exports is expected to cause a major fiscal and balance-of-payment shock.
Syria's authoritarian regime, heavily regulated economy, inadequate infrastructure, outmoded technological base, a blotted public sector, and weak economic institutions combined with declining oil revenues, make the country vulnerable to future shocks while hampering its ability to compete at the regional and international levels.
meria.idc.ac.il /journal/2007/issue2/jv11no2a4.html   (6921 words)

  
 Syria (05/07)
Syria is significant in the history of Christianity; Paul was converted on the road to Damascus and established the first organized Christian Church at Antioch in ancient Syria, from which he left on many of his missionary journeys.
Syria's political instability during the years after the 1954 coup, the parallelism of Syrian and Egyptian policies, and the appeal of Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser's leadership in the wake of the 1956 Suez crisis created support in Syria for union with Egypt.
Syria was an active belligerent in the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, which resulted in Israel's occupation of the Golan Heights and the city of Quneitra.
www.state.gov /r/pa/ei/bgn/3580.htm   (7350 words)

  
 USCFL - The Collapsing Syrian Economy
Syria is one of the last surviving communist countries – communist not formally but in its economic structure.
Syria's economy produces a level of GDP per capita that lies somewhere between $600 (well below Egypt's) and $1200, depending on the source.
A Syria whose economy is contracting may be one that can be deterred by an Israel willing to engage it in an economic race, or - more specifically - an arms race.
www.freelebanon.org /articles/v38.htm   (1413 words)

  
 Syria as a strategic prop for Hezbollah and Hamas
Syria (and Iran) can also expected to rehabilitate the terrorist organizations' operational capabilities once the current battles have ended.
Syria also used Hezbollah against the multinational force (which included American, French and Italian units) set up to supervise the evacuation of the Syrian army and the Palestinian terrorists after the Israeli siege of Beirut.
Politically, Syria is in favor of an immediate and unconditional ceasefire, opposes an effective multinational force which would not receive Lebanese consensus (i.e., Hezbollah would not agree) and rejects the disarmament of Hezbollah.
www.terrorism-info.org.il /malam_multimedia/English/eng_n/html/syria_strategy_e.htm   (1769 words)

  
 The Political Economy of Syria Under Bashar Al-Assad
Syria, categorized by the World Bank as a middle-income country, has a GDP per capita of about $2,500, equal to $4,000, calculated on the basis of purchasing power parity (PPP).
Syria's GDP is highly dependent on the oil and agricultural sectors, both subject to uncertainties affected, as they are, by changes in oil prices and rainfall, respectively.
The sovereign risk for Syria’s public debt stock will also remain high given Syria’s poor repayment record, which placed it among the few countries on the World Bank’s non-accrual status (an elegant phrase for default) in the years 1987-2002, and hence Syria was ineligible to borrow from the multilateral institution.
www.freerepublic.com /focus/f-news/1817150/posts   (1873 words)

  
 Syria - Growth and Structure of the Economy
Although agriculture's share in the economy had declined over the years, even in the late 1980s the wide swings in annual harvests had pronounced effects on such sectors as trade, transportation, finance, and industry.
Growth of the economy, measured by GDP at market prices in terms of constant 1980 prices, averaged 9.7 percent a year during the 1970s.
As a result of the varying sectoral growth rates, the economy gradually shifted from an agrarian-based structure prior to 1970 to an economy based on services and the commercial sector in the 1980s (See figure 1, Growth and Structure of GDP, 1980-85).
countrystudies.us /syria/40.htm   (872 words)

  
 Syria   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Syria shares common borders with Turkey to the north, the Mediterranean Sea and Lebanon to the West, Iraq to the east, and Israel and Jordan to the south.
Syria must also prove over the next several years that it is not a country that harbors terrorists or has anything to do with terrorism throughout the world.
Somehow Syria must prove to the United States and the rest of the world that it is not a country that promotes terrorism but a country that is striving for peace throughout the Middle East.
www.faculty.fairfield.edu /faculty/hodgson/Courses/so191/Projects3/Syria/Syria.html   (4577 words)

  
 Syria: Economy — FactMonster.com
Syria was an overwhelmingly agricultural country until the early 1960s, when planned large-scale industrialization began.
Petroleum pipelines from Iraq and Jordan cross Syria, and there is also a pipeline from Qarah Shuk to the Mediterranean coast.
The annual value of Syria's imports is greater than the value of its exports.
www.factmonster.com /ce6/world/A0861412.html   (305 words)

  
 Forecast of the Lebanese economy in the post Syrian occupation era
This is due to the fact Syria's leaders (the Assad family) bought the loyalty of Syria's intelligence organisation, top generals and businessmen by offering them influence and business opportunities in Lebanon's economy.
The long term damage caused by Syria's occupation and involvement in Lebanon's economy is estimated to be between $25- $30 billion over the last 29 years.
However one of the main damages caused to the Lebanese economy as a result of Syrian occupation and influence is the huge losses racked up by the public utility sector due to their inefficiency and lack of reform.
www.meepas.com /lebaneseeconomyaftersyria.htm   (1471 words)

  
 Foreign Affairs - The Syrian Solution - Volker Perthes
Volker Perthes is Director of the German Institute for International and Security Affairs and the author of The Political Economy of Syria Under Asad and Arab Elites: Negotiating the Politics of Change.
Understanding Syria's behavior during the crisis requires taking into account the domestic and regional challenges that the Syrian regime currently faces.
Assad also misjudged the international and Lebanese reactions to his decision to have the mandate of the Damascus-backed Lebanese president, Emile Lahoud, extended in 2004 and failed to anticipate the storm that would ensue after the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minster Rafiq Hariri, which forced Syrian troops to leave Lebanon.
www.foreignaffairs.org /20061101faessay85604/volker-perthes/the-syrian-solution.html   (684 words)

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