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Topic: Edict of Milan


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  Milan, city, Italy. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Milan was severely damaged by the Huns (c.450) and again by the Goths (539) and was conquered by the Lombards in 569.
Milan suffered from internal warfare between rich and poor, from the Guelph and Ghibelline strife, and from the enmity of rival cities, which assisted Emperor Frederick I in destroying it (1163).
Milan lost its republican liberties; first the Torriani, then the Visconti (1277) became its lords.
www.bartleby.com /65/mi/MilanIt.html   (610 words)

  
  Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Edict of Milan
The Edict of Milan (313) declared that the Roman Empire would be neutral with regard to religious worship, officially removing all obstacles to the practice of Christianity and other religions.
The Edict of Milan initiated the period known by Christian historians as the Peace of the Church, and it has been interpreted by Christians as officially giving imperial favor to Christianity, as Constantine became the first emperor to actually promote and grant favors to the Church and its members.
The Edict of Milan was issued in 313, in the names of the Roman Emperors Constantine I, who ruled the western parts of the Empire, and Licinius, who ruled the east.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Edict_of_Milan   (499 words)

  
  The Dispatch - Serving the Lexington, NC - News   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Edict of Milan (313) declared that the Roman Empire would be neutral with regard to religious worship, officially removing all obstacles to the practice of Christianity and other religions.
The Edict of Milan initiated the period known by Christian historians as the Peace of the Church, and it has been interpreted by Christians as officially giving imperial favor to Christianity, as Constantine became the first emperor to actually promote and grant favors to the Church and its members.
The Edict of Milan was issued in 313, in the names of the Roman Emperors Constantine I, who ruled the western parts of the Empire, and Licinius, who ruled the east.
www.the-dispatch.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Edict_of_Milan   (539 words)

  
 Edict of Milan
The "Edict of Milan" (313 CE) declared that the Roman Empire would be neutral with regard to religious worship, officially ending all government-sanctioned persecution especially of Christianity.
The Edict was issued in the names of the Western tetrarch Constantine the Great, and Licinius, the Eastern tetrarch.
The actual edicts have not been retrieved inscribed upon stone, but quoted at length in a historical work with a theme of divine retribution, by the Church Father Lactantius, De mortibus persecutionibus ("Deaths of the persecutors") in chapters 35 and 48.
www.xasa.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/e/ed/edict_of_milan.html   (495 words)

  
 Edict Of Milan   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A previous edict of toleration had been recently issued from Nicomedia by the Emperor Galerius in 311.
Enforcement of the Edict returned the meeting places and other properties which had been confiscated from the Christians and sold out of the government treasury: "…the same shall be restored to the Christians without payment or any claim of recompense and without any kind of fraud or deception…".
The actual edicts have not been retrieved inscribed upon stone, but quoted at length in a historical work with a theme of divine retribution, by the Church Father Lactantius, ''De mortibus persecutionibus'' ("Deaths of the persecutors") in chapters 35 and 48.
www.seattleluxury.com /encyclopedia/entry/Edict_of_Milan   (574 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Edict of Paris (614), by Clotaire II of Neustria.
It was an edict of toleration that recognized the existence of the Protestants and guaranteed freedom of conscience and private worship.
Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), by Louis XIV of France.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=edict   (521 words)

  
 Medieval Sourcebook: Galerius and Constantine: Edicts of Toleration 311/313
Medieval Sourcebook: Galerius and Constantine: Edicts of Toleration 311/313
Both in the case of the edict of toleration by Galerius and that by Constantine and Licinius, the original Latin text is to be found in Lactantius, and merely a Greek translation in Eusebius, (H. E., Bk.
EDICT OF TOLERATION BY GALERIUS- 311 A. (Ch.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/source/edict-milan.html   (549 words)

  
 Edict of Milan - Definition, explanation
The "Edict of Milan" (313 AD) declared that the Roman Empire would be neutral with regard to religious worship, officially ending all government-sanctioned persecution especially of Christianity.
The Edict was issued in the names of the Western tetrarch Constantine the Great, and Licinius, the Eastern tetrarch.
The actual edicts have not been retrieved inscribed upon stone, but quoted at length in a historical work with a theme of divine retribution, by the Church Father Lactantius, De mortibus persecutionibus ("Deaths of the persecutors") in chapters 35 and 48.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/e/ed/edict_of_milan.php   (507 words)

  
 Milan Hotel Discounts | PerfectPlacesTravel.com
The graceful porticoes and ornate friezes of medieval Milan blend and fade in a symphony of color and texture up against the stark definition in steel and concrete of the modern rendition of that venerable city.
Milan is a city that reveres its history, yet it is up to date and always ready for something new and exciting.
Milan is a center of culture and commerce.
www.perfectplacestravel.com /Italy/Milan   (633 words)

  
 History of Milan
After 313 A.D., the year of the Edict of Tolerance towards Christianity issued by Constantine the Great, many churches were built and the first bishop, St Ambrose, was appointed: Ambrogio was such an influential person that the church became the Ambrosian Church (7 December is a holiday to honour Sant’Ambrogio, the Milan's patron).
It was under their rule that began the construction of the Duomo in 1386 (that then became the symbol of the city) and of the Castle Porta Giovia (then destroyed y rebuilt by Francesco Sforza and still nowadays known as Sforza Castle).
During the war Milan was destroyed.At the end of World War II Lombardy was instrumental in the boom that transformed Italy from a relatively backward, agricultural country to an industrial world leader.
www.aboutmilan.com /history-of-milan.html   (1521 words)

  
 News | TimesDaily.com | TimesDaily | Florence, Alabama (AL)
The Edict of Milan was a letter that proclaimed religious toleration in the Roman Empire.
that the second edict went beyond the first edict of 311: "it was a decisive step from hostile neutrality to friendly neutrality and protection, and prepared the way for the legal recognition of Christianity, as the religion of the empire." The wording of the Edict reveals that such developments, however, remained in the future.
The Edict of Milan was issued in 313 AD, in the names of the Roman Emperors Constantine I, who ruled the western parts of the Empire, and Licinius, who ruled the east.
www.timesdaily.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Edict_of_Milan   (808 words)

  
 HotBot Web Search for milan
Milan is divided into 20 zones, identified numerically by the local council.
Milan is the country's business capital and the center for everything that's up-to-the-minute.
Probably of Celtic origin, Milan was conquered by Rome in 222 B.C. In later Roman times it was the capital (A.D. 305-402) of the Western...
www.hotbot.com /index.php?prov=Inktomi&query=milan&ps=&loc=related6&tab=web&currProv=ask&first=30&page=more   (279 words)

  
 About the city of Milan
Milan has an ancient city centre with high and interesting buildings and palazzos, that is why so many people from all over the world want to see the city of glamour.
Milan has been a rich and important city all the time, it always was a place for famous artists of the various eras and offered a particular assortment of churches, buildings and monuments.
The Sforza Castle is one of the symbols of Milan together with the Madonnina and the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II.
www.aboutmilan.com /the-city-of-milan.html   (848 words)

  
 Edict of Milan Totally Explained
The Edict of Milan (313) was a letter that proclaimed religious toleration in the Roman Empire.
The Edict, in the form of a joint letter to be circulated among the governors of the East, declared that the Empire would be neutral with regard to religious worship, officially removing all obstacles to the practice of Christianity and other religions.
The Edict of Milan was issued in 313 AD, in the names of the Roman Emperors Constantine I, who ruled the western parts of the Empire, and Licinius, who ruled the east.
edict_of_milan.totallyexplained.com   (612 words)

  
 The School of Mathematics UEA: Student Guide to Milan
Milan is the capital of Lombardy, a wealthy region in the north of Italy, that borders onto Switzerland.
Students at the University of Milan are entitled to an 'abbonamento', a pass that is valid for month, for the person to use the metro, buses and trams.
Milan also has a bank holiday on 7th December for St. Ambrogio's day (St. Ambrogio is the patron saint of Milan) and a massive fair/market is held for a few days at the church of St. Ambrogio.
www.mth.uea.ac.uk /maths/Student_Guides/Milan.html   (5524 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for edict   (Site not responding. Last check: )
As pastor of Saumur he won a reputation as a theologian and orator, and he was appointed (1631) to present to Louis XIII the protest of the synod against infractions of the Edict of Nantes.
He long urged the abolition of serfdom and is generally considered the author of the Edict of Emancipation promulgated by Alexander II in...
He became one of the leading statesmen of the Tanzimat reform movement, and was responsible for the Hatt-i Humayun reform edict of 1856.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=edict&StartAt=41   (776 words)

  
 Edict of Milan - OrthodoxWiki
The Edict of Milan was a declaration issued in 313 by the Emperor Constantine which made all religions legal within the Roman Empire, though it was especially intended to legalize Christianity.
Paganism, the official religion of the Empire and particularly of the army, was disestablished as such, and property which had previously been confiscated from Christians was returned.
The Edict followed Constantine the Great's 311 conversion of his entire army preceding the Battle of Milvian Bridge, after which he gained control of the Western portion of the Empire.
orthodoxwiki.org /Edict_of_Milan   (248 words)

  
 Edict of Milan || isoHunt - World's largest BitTorrent and P2P search engine
Edict of Milan Edict of Milan- All about your favorite things.
Licinius of the East proclaimed the Edict of Milan, which established a policy of religious freedom for all.
The Edict of Milan was granted by Emperor Constantine the Great in the West and Licinius Augustus in the East.
www.isohunt.com /web/Edict+of+Milan?iht=   (273 words)

  
 Theology Adrift
From a political perspective, Constantine's Edict of Milan, issued in AD 313, constituted the formal beginning of a major paradigm shift that signaled the end of the ancient world and the beginning of the medieval period.
While the edict was couched in terms of tolerance to all forms of religion, its significance and historical impact lies in the fact that its author, Constantine, was the first Roman emperor openly sympathetic to Christianity.
From a theological perspective -- specifically an eschatological one -- the Edict of Milan also signaled a monumental paradigm shift -- from the well-grounded premillennialism of the ancient church fathers to the amillennialism or postmillennialism that would dominate eschatological thinking from the fourth century AD to at least the middle part of the nineteenth century.
www.biblicist.org /bible/adrift.htm   (5998 words)

  
 The edict of MIlan
The persecution of Christians ended in 313 when Constantine of the West and Licinius of the East proclaimed the Edict of Milan, which established a policy of religious freedom for all.
This document is merely an edict from the emperor allowing Christians places where they could assemble to worship their God as they so desired.
What this edict did once and for all was to end the persecutions and acknowledged the right of Christians to worship as they chose.
www.docbible.com /Edict_of_Milan.htm   (816 words)

  
 Edict of Milan - OrthodoxWiki
The Edict of Milan was a declaration issued in 313 by the Emperor Constantine which made all religions legal within the Roman Empire, though it was especially intended to legalize Christianity.
Paganism, the official religion of the Empire and particularly of the army, was disestablished as such, and property which had previously been confiscated from Christians was returned.
The Edict followed Constantine the Great's 311 conversion of his entire army preceding the Battle of Milvian Bridge, after which he gained control of the Western portion of the Empire.
www.orthodoxwiki.org /Edict_of_Milan   (248 words)

  
 Guide and Travel Facts: Milan, Italy
Milan is the symbol of the economic development and prosperity of northern Italy.
Milan is certainly not immune to the corruption more normally associated with the south.
A brief historical sketch To the ancient Romans, Milan was Mediolanum ('middle of the plain').
www.passports.com /trips/cityfact/cityfact.asp?city=Milan   (1806 words)

  
 Anthology of World Literature : Section 6 : Overview
Until Constantine issued the Edict of Milan, declaring tolerance for all religions, in 313, the Christian church was often persecuted by imperial authorities, particularly under the rule of emperors Nero, Marcus Aurelius, and Diocletian.
The four Gospels were collected with other documents to form the New Testament, which Pope Damasus had translated from Greek to Latin by the scholar Jerome in 393–405.
In addition to internal turmoil, the stability of the Roman empire was threatened externally by new enemies: the Persians to the east, and the Goths to the north.
www.wwnorton.com /nawol/s6_overview.htm   (844 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Peace of the Church
This edict was the result of utter impotency to prolong the contest.
Complete amnesty and freedom were attained two years later when Emperor Constantine, after defeating Maxentius, published early in 313 with his colleague Licinius the famous Edict of Milan by which Christians were guaranteed the fullest liberty in the practice of their
eccl., VIII, xvii; Edict of Constantine in Hist.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/16066a.htm   (634 words)

  
 Roman Emperors DIR Licinius
As soon as he arrived in Nicomedeia, Licinius promulgated the Edict of Milan.
Constantine had issued the Edict of Milan in early 313, Licinius turned on the Christians in his realm seemingly in 320.
The so-called Edict of Milan is discussed, for example, by O. Seeck, RE 13, col. 222.37ff, idem.
www.roman-emperors.org /licinius.htm   (2246 words)

  
 313 A.D. - the beginning of Constantine's cooption of Christianity
In less than a hundred years after the Edict of Milan, nearly all of the other 90 percent had been "converted." The church believed that this rapid growth was a sure sign of God's approval.
The movement toward "Christian sacralism" began in A.D. with the promulgation of the Edict of Toleration (also known as the Edict of Milan because it was first published in that city).
This edict declared the Christian religion to be religio licita (a permitted cult), a status it had not had before.
www.bibletexts.com /terms/313ad.htm   (3453 words)

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