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Topic: Edict of Nantes


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  EDICT OF NANTES - Online Information article about EDICT OF NANTES
Nantes on the 13th of April 1598, and of 56 particular ones, signed on the 2nd of May.
political position secured to the French Protestants by the edict of Nantes was very objectionable, not only to the ardent Roman Catholics, but also to more moderate persons, and the payments made to their ministers by the state were viewed with increasing dislike.
Louis revoked the edict, thus depriving the Protestants in France of all civil and religious liberty.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /NAN_NEW/NANTES_EDICT_OF.html   (1136 words)

  
  Edict of Nantes - LoveToKnow 1911
EDICT OF NANTES, the law promulgated in April 1598 by which the French king, Henry IV., gave religious liberty to his Protestant subjects, the Huguenots.
The story of the struggle for the edict is part of the history of France, and during the thirty-five years of civil war which preceded its grant, many treaties and other arrangements had been made between the contending religious parties, but none of these had been satisfactory or lasting.
The main provisions of the edict of Nantes may be briefly summarized under six heads: (r) It gave liberty of conscience to the Protestants throughout the whole of France.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Edict_of_Nantes   (651 words)

  
 Edict of Nantes [1589]
The Edict of Nantes integrated the various religious provisions of this series of broken treaties and provided a number of additional ones.
In 1629, Cardinal de Richelieu [chief minister of king Louis XII] annulled the edict’s political clauses at the Peace of Alès.
On October 18, 1685, Louis XIV revoked the edict in its entirety and deprived French Protestants of all religious and civil liberties.
www.french-at-a-touch.com /French_History/edict_of_nantes_[1589].htm   (831 words)

  
 About Nantes
Christianised in the 3rd century, Nantes is successively invaded by the Saxons (around 285), the Franks (around 500), the Britons (in the 6th and 7th centuries) and the Normans (in 843).
The Edict of Nantes was issued on April 13, 1598 by Henry IV of France to grant French Protestants (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a Catholic nation.
The Edict of Nantes that Henry signed was made up of four basic texts, including the principal text made up of more than ninety articles, which was largely based on unsuccessful peace treaties that had been hammered out during the recent troubles.
www.heart4france.com /AboutNantes.htm   (824 words)

  
 Edict of Nantes - Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Edict of Nantes 1598, decree promulgated at Nantes by King Henry IV to restore internal peace in France, which had been torn by the Wars of Religion; the edict defined the rights of the French Protestants (see Huguenots).
By a series of edicts that narrowly interpreted the Edict of Nantes, he reduced it to a scrap of paper.
The revocation of the Edict of Nantes weakened the French economy by driving out a highly skilled and industrious segment of the nation, and its ruthless application increased the detestation in which England and the Protestant German states held the French king.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Nantes-E.html   (676 words)

  
 Nantes, Edict of. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
The last condition, originally devised for an eight-year period but subsequently renewed, was to serve as guarantee to the Huguenots that their other rights would be respected; however, it gave French Protestantism a virtual state within a state and was incompatible with the centralizing policies of cardinals Richelieu and Mazarin and of Louis XIV.
By a series of edicts that narrowly interpreted the Edict of Nantes, he reduced it to a scrap of paper.
The revocation of the Edict of Nantes weakened the French economy by driving out a highly skilled and industrious segment of the nation, and its ruthless application increased the detestation in which England and the Protestant German states held the French king.
www.bartleby.com /65/na/Nantes-E.html   (364 words)

  
 Edict of Nantes information - Search.com
The Edict of Nantes was issued on April 13, 1598 by Henry IV of France to grant French Protestants (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic.
The main concern was civil unity, and the Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than mere schismatics and heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance.
In offering general freedom of conscience to individuals, the edict offered many specific concessions to the Protestants: amnesty, the reinstatement of their civil rights, including the right to work in any field or for the State and to bring grievances directly to the king.
www.search.com /reference/Edict_of_Nantes   (647 words)

  
 History of Nantes - Nantes Travel Guide, France
Nantes was successively invaded by the Saxons around 285, the Franks around 500, the Britons in the 6th and 7th centuries, and the Normans in 843.
Nantes was the slave trade capital of France during the 18th century, prior the abolition of slavery.
Nantes chose to be part of it, although the whole surrounding region soon degenerated in an open civil war against the new republic when the French Revolution broke out.
www.nantestravel.com /history.htm   (411 words)

  
 Nantes (Municipality, Loire-Atlantique, France)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Nantes is the prefecture of the department of Loire-Atlantique and regional prefecture of Region Pays de la Loire.
Nantes (in Breton, Naoned) was founded by the Gaul tribe of Namnetes on the confluency of three rivers (Loire, Sèvre and Erdre), being therefore both a maritime and mainland city.
In 1499, King of France Louis XII married Duchess Ann of Brittany, François II's daughter, in the castle of Nantes, thus preparing the annexation of Brittany to France (1532).
www.crwflags.com /fotw/flags/fr-44-na.html   (871 words)

  
 Nantes - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Nantes, city, western France, capital of Loire-Atlantique Department, on the Loire River, near the Bay of Biscay (an arm of the Atlantic Ocean).
Nantes, Edict of, decree giving partial religious freedom to the Huguenots (French Protestants), proclaimed by Henry IV, king of France, in 1598 and...
In 1598, Henry IV of France issued the Edict of Nantes there, granting partial religious freedom to the Protestant Huguenots.
ca.encarta.msn.com /Nantes.html   (87 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
It was an edict of toleration that recognized the existence of the Protestants and guaranteed freedom of conscience and private worship.
Edict of Nantes (1598), by King Henry IV of France.
Edict of Fontainebleau (1685), by Louis XIV of France.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=edict   (521 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Edict of Nantes
In offering general freedom of conscience to individuals, the edict offered many specific concessions to the Protestants: an amnesty, the reinstatement of their civil rights, including the right to work in any field or for the State and to bring grievances directly to the king.
The Edict of Nantes that Henry signed comprised four basic texts, including the principal text made up of more than ninety articles and largely based on unsuccessful peace treaties hammered out during the recent troubles.
In October 1685, however, Louis XIV, the grandson of Henry IV, renounced the Edict and declared Protestantism illegal with the Edict of Fontainebleau.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Edict_of_Nantes   (737 words)

  
 The Edict Of Nantes   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Edict of Nantes was promulgated on April 15, 1598, in the city of Nantes as indicated by its name.
That the Edict of Nantes was simply an edict of tolerance and nothing more can easily be shown in the sphere of religion wherein the official religion, that of the king as well as of the state was, as was also true of all of their predecessors, the Catholic, Apostolic and Roman Church.
Quite obviously, the Edict of Nantes is a purely legislative text, an act of royal power regulating a case in particular, in a well-defined situation and without bringing into question the (unwritten) fundamental law of the kingdom, nor its relations with the Catholic Church.
www.sspx.ca /Angelus/2002_January/The_Edict_Of_Nantes.htm   (3803 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Edict of Nantes was signed two centuries later on the April 13 1598.
It's best known for the Edict of Nantes, issued by Henri IV in 1598, guaranteeing religious freedom to Protestants (it was later revoked).
It was partially due to Madame de Maintenon's influence that Louis revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685.
www.lycos.com /info/nantes--edict.html   (344 words)

  
 NANTES, France - Seattle Sister City
Nantes, one of France's regional capitals, is a major seaport near the mouth of the Loire River in northwest France.
The city grew around the Chateau des Ducs de Bretagne where the Edict of Nantes was signed in1598 granting religious freedom to French Protestants.
Nantes is a center for horticulture with many beautiful parks and gardens.
www.ci.seattle.wa.us /oir/Nantes.htm   (221 words)

  
 The Dispatch - Serving the Lexington, NC - News   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In offering general freedom of conscience to individuals, the edict offered many specific concessions to the Protestants: amnesty, the reinstatement of their civil rights, including the right to work in any field or for the State and to bring grievances directly to the king.
The Edict of Nantes that Henry signed comprised four basic texts, including a principal text made up of ninety two articles and largely based on unsuccessful peace treaties hammered out during the recent troubles.
Upon the revocation of the edict, Frederick Wilhelm issued the Edict of Potsdam to encourage Protestants to come to Brandenburg.
www.the-dispatch.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=edict_of_Nantes   (699 words)

  
 Edict of Nantes — FactMonster.com
Nantes, Edict of, 1598, decree promulgated at Nantes by King Henry IV to restore internal peace in France, which had been torn by the Wars of Religion; the edict defined the rights of the French Protestants (see
Huguenots: Wars of Religion and the Edict of Nantes - Wars of Religion and the Edict of Nantes The conspiracy of Amboise (1560; see Amboise, conspiracy...
Edict of Nantes - Edict of Nantes An edict published by Henri IV.
www.factmonster.com /ce6/history/A0834814.html   (408 words)

  
 The National Huguenot Society - Information on The Edict of Nantes
The Edict of Nantes, formally signed by Henri IV on April 13, 1598, was one of the most far- reaching, significant acts of religious tolerance in history.
The edict was not registered in the Parlement of Grenoble until September 1599, while the Parlements of Dijon and Toulouse held out until January 1600 and the Parlements of Aix and Rennes until August 1600.
The terms of the Edict of Nantes could quite easily become realities because, while still vexing to the two ardent but marginal camps with their exclusive beliefs, it benefited in the long run the two rival religious confessions by bringing security for the majority of the population.
www.huguenot.netnation.com /books/edict.htm   (1369 words)

  
 The Edict of Nantes--A Charter for Tolerance? - Jehovah's Witnesses Official Web Site
Four hundred years later, instead of arousing resentment and opposition, the edict is celebrated as an act of tolerance and one of the important steps toward guaranteeing religious rights for all.
The Edict of Nantes that Henry signed was made up of four basic texts, including the principal text made up of 92 or 95 articles and the 56 secret, or "particular," articles dealing with Protestant rights and obligations.
Ironically, in 1998, the year marking the fourth centennial of the Edict of Nantes, its lesson—that freedom of religion and equal treatment should be guaranteed for all citizens—has apparently been forgotten.
watchtower.org /e/19981122/article_01.htm   (1510 words)

  
 Edict of Nantes
The charter of protestant rights was the Edict of Nantes on April 13, 1598.
It was in effect for nearly a hundred years, until revoked by the absolutist, Louis XIV in 1685 on the grounds that it endangered the unity and religious peace of the state.
The Edict of Nantes was a landmark in the history of toleration and freedom.
www.latter-rain.com /eccles/edictn.htm   (176 words)

  
 Centuries
In the 17th century, protestants living under the legislation prescribed by the Edict of Nantes contributed greatly to their times as academics and theologians.
And in 1685, with the revocation of the edict of Nantes, Protestantism was outlawed in France.
Repression was to diminish towards the end of the century and Protestants, recognised by the Edict of Tolerance, were to play an important role during the period of the revolution.
www.museeprotestant.org /Pages/Home.php?collid=1&Lget=EN   (413 words)

  
 nantes.html
The Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, October 22, 1685
And since by this fact the execution of the Edict of Nantes and of all that has ever been ordained in favor of the said
Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV in October, 1685, near the same time of Joseph
www.exulanten.com /nantes.html   (1757 words)

  
 Edict of Nantes
As if this were not enough, the articles on the history of historical thinking about the Edict in France and Europe down to the present are a remarkable testimony to the usually quite positivist and triumphalist attitude of historians in France, eager to pursue one or another type of "new" history.
The Edict reestablished the Church everywhere in the realm — thus denying the legal possibility of Huguenot enclaves that excluded Catholics.
Montalembert's éloge of the Edict of Nantes was in effect condemned in Pope Pius IX's reign by a papal official, Antonelli.
www.ranumspanat.com /edict_nantes.html   (4739 words)

  
 Nantes, France
Nantes was the birthplace of the writer Jules Verne (1828-1905).
Nantes, under the name of Condevincum, was the capital of a Gallic tribe, the Namnetae.
Thanks to its port Nantes developed into a flourishing commercial town by the 16th C. In the 19th C its trade declined, since the larger vessels then coming into service could not sail up the Loire, so that it became necessary to build an outer harbor at St-Nazaire and develop new industries in Nantes.
www.planetware.com /france/nantes-f-loi-nan.htm   (229 words)

  
 Protestant history in France
The edict of Nantes and its antecedents (1562-1598) (in progress)
The edict of Nantes (April 13, 1598), its text, and more details on the edict of Nantes
The edict of Tolerance (November 7, 1787) (in progress)
huguenotsweb.free.fr /english/history.htm   (68 words)

  
 L'Edit de Nantes -- Translated from the French language "official site" in 1998
It is to Nantes glory to have associated its name with one of the most far reaching acts of religious tolerance in history.
It is in this context that the Edict of Nantes was signed, after being negotiated for nearly two years, by the royal police chiefs and the representatives of the political organization of the Huguenots.
Nevertheless, in spite of its weakness in the face of an absolutest monarchy, the Edict of Nantes remains unique in the history of continental Europe, and, perhaps, is only surpassed in the original protections, which were afforded to persons in the United States under the US Constitution.
www.hightowertrail.com /HUGU2.HTM   (1076 words)

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