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Topic: Edicts of Ashoka


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In the News (Fri 26 Apr 19)

  
  Ashoka - MSN Encarta
Ashoka stands unique among emperors in world history: After successfully concluding a major military campaign, he was so disturbed by the suffering that it had caused that he forsook war and thereafter endorsed nonviolence and peaceful persuasion in consolidating his vast empire.
Whereas Ashoka is largely ignored in Hindu sources, in Buddhist texts he is presented as a pious Buddhist king whose principal concern was the well-being of the sangha.
Ashoka’s legendary fame in Buddhist societies arises from his later association with the concept of the chakraqvartin, or the righteous ruler in whose reign the wheel of law, the symbol representing the fundamental teachings of Buddhism, rolls across the kingdom ensuring the welfare of all.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761560092/Ashoka.html   (0 words)

  
 Indian History Sourcebook: Ashoka, King of Behar: The Rock Edicts, c. 257 BCE
[Tappan Introduction] Ashoka, King of Behar, became a convert to Buddhism about 257 B.C. He was a most zealous missionary, and his little sermons, known as "Edicts," were carved upon the rocks and pillars, and may still be seen.
But now, when this pious edict is being written, only three living creatures are slaughtered for curry, to wit, two peacocks and one antelope---the antelope, however, not invariably.
For this purpose, have I caused this pious edict to be written, that it may long endure, and that my sons and grandsons may exert themselves for the welfare of all folk.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/india/ashoka-edicts.html   (759 words)

  
  Buddhism / history of buddhism / edicts of ashoka
The Edicts of Ashoka are a collection of 33 inscriptions on the Pillars of Ashoka, as well as boulders and cave walls, made by the Emperor Ashoka of the Mauryan dynasty during his reign from 272 to 231 BCE.
Ashoka did not completely prohibit the killing of animals, but he prohibited gratuitous killings (such as for sacrifices), he advocated restraint in the number that had to be killed for consumption, protected some of them, and in general condemned violent acts against animals, such as castration.
Ashoka allegedly took great care of the welfare of his (human and animal) populations and those beyond his borders, spreading the use of medicinal treatments, improving roadside facilities for more comfortable travel, and establishing “officers of the faith” throughout his territories to survey the welfare of the population and the propagation of the Dharma.
www.buddhism-guide.com /buddhism/edicts_of_ashoka.htm   (2160 words)

  
  Clinton Goveas :: Wikipedia Reference
Ashoka, at this time, was already married to Asandhimitra who was to be his much-loved chief queen for many years until her death.
Ashoka was grieved by this, and was counselled by his nephew (who had been raised in the ashram and was more priest than prince) to embrace his dharma and draw away from war.
Ashoka was the sponsor of the third Buddhist council in which he supported the Vibhajjavada sub-school of the Sthaviravāda sect (which would become known by the Pali Theravada).
www.clintongoveas.com /wikipedia/?title=Ashoka   (4747 words)

  
 Ashoka - MSN Encarta
These edicts, in Prakrit for the Indian population and in Greek and Aramaic for the people in the north-west of his empire who were Hellenistic Greeks and Iranians, were inscribed on rock surfaces or on specially polished columns with handsomely sculpted capitals.
On becoming king, Ashoka was required to rule a vast empire stretching from north-eastern India to the southern border of modern Karnataka, eastward to the Ganges delta, and to the north-west, incorporating southern and eastern Afghanistan.
After eight years as king, Ashoka conquered Kalinga (in modern Orissa), both to control a part of the subcontinent that was rich in ores and agrarian revenue, and to secure the sea route along the east coast to the Krishna valley, where major gold fields and veins of semi-precious stones were located.
uk.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761560092/Ashoka.html   (1037 words)

  
 Britain.tv Wikipedia - Ashoka
Ashoka, at this time, was already married to Asandhimitra who was to be his much-loved chief queen for many years till her death.
Ashoka was constantly on the war campaign, conquering territory after territory and significantly expanding the already large Mauryan empire and adding to his wealth.
Ashoka was grieved by this, and was counselled by his nephew (who had been raised in the ashram and was more priest than prince) to embrace his dharma and draw away from war.
www.britain.tv /wikipedia.php?title=Ashoka   (4493 words)

  
 Edicts Of Ashoka : Sirchin
Edicts of Ashoka are a collection of 33 inscriptions on the Pillars of Ashoka, as well as boulders and cave walls, made by the Emperor Ashoka of the Mauryan dynasty during his reign from 272 to 231 BCE.
According to the edicts, the extent of Buddhist proselytism during this period reached as far as the Mediterranean, and many Buddhist monuments were created.
Edicts of Ashoka are the oldest preserved historical documents of India, and from Ashoka's time, approximate dating of dynasties becomes possible.
sirchin.com /?topic:edicts-of-ashoka   (458 words)

  
 In 324 BCE, Chandragupta, ruler of the Mauryan Empire set out to conquer the weaker surrounding kingdoms to expand the ...
Ashoka was anointed the new emperor in 274 BCE.
Edward D'cruz interprets the Ashokan dharma as a "religion to be used as a symbol of a new imperial unity and a cementing force to weld the diverse and heterogeneous elements of the empire".
Ashoka's intent was to instigate "a practice of social behavior so broad and benevolent in its scope that no person, no matter what his religion, could reasonably object to it".
www.csuchico.edu /~cheinz/syllabi/asst001/spring98/Ashoka.htm   (1482 words)

  
 Ashoka information - Search.com
A convert to Buddhism, Ashoka established monuments marking several significant sites in the life of Shakyamuni Buddha, and according to Buddhist tradition was closely involved in the preservation and transmission of Buddhism.
Ashoka was the son of the Maurya Emperor Bindusara by a relatively lower ranked queen named Dharma.
Ashoka, at this time, was already married to Asandhimitra who was to be his much loved chief queen for many years till her death.
domainhelp.search.com /reference/Ashoka   (3242 words)

  
 Ashoka LANGUAGE SCHOOL EXPLORER
Ashoka, at this time, was already married to Asandhimitra who was to be his much-loved chief queen for many years until her death.
Ashoka was grieved by this, and was counselled by his nephew (who had been raised in the ashram and was more priest than prince) to embrace his dharma and draw away from war.
Ashoka also said that all his courtiers were true to their self and governed the people in a moral manner.
www.school-explorer.com /info/Ashoka   (5010 words)

  
 Our Insperation for the Conservancy   (Site not responding. Last check: )
King Ashoka's edicts are mainly concerned with the reforms he instituted and the moral principles he recommended in his attempt to create a just and humane society in a co-symbiotic relationship with the environment.
Ashoka's edicts, which comprise the earliest decipherable corpus of written documents from India, have survived throughout the centuries because they are written on rocks and stone pillars.
Ashoka actively participated in methods of higher education in his kingdom, and brought the attention of his kingdom away from slavery and violence, and focused their attention on preservation and education.
www.ahimsainternational.org /inspiration/index.php   (1491 words)

  
 The Edicts of King Ashoka - I presented in History section
Asoka’s edicts are mainly concerned with the reforms he instituted and the moral principles he recommended in his attempt to create a just and humane society.
The language used in the edicts found in the eastern part of the sub-continent is a type of Magadhi, probably the official language of Asoka’s court.
The language used in the edicts found in the western part of India is closer to Sanskrit although one bilingual edict in Afghanistan is written in Aramaic and Greek.
www.newsfinder.org /site/comments/the_edicts_of_king_ashoka_i   (2506 words)

  
 The My Hero Project - Ashoka
Ashoka was the ruler of the Mauryan Empire from 273 B.C. to 232 B.C. His territory included most of India and parts of what is today Afghanistan and Iran.
Edicts of Ashoka "A collection of 33 inscriptions on the Pillars of Ashoka, as well as boulders and cave walls, made by the Emperor Ashoka."
Ashoka was a fierce warrior-king who changed his ways and became a beloved peacemaker.
www.myhero.com /hero.asp?hero=Ashoka   (709 words)

  
 Ashokan Inscriptions India, Ashoka, Monuments of India, Emperor Ashoka, Ashokan Edicts.
Ashoka's edicts are mainly concerned with the reforms he instituted and the moral principles he recommended in his attempt to build a fair and humane society.
The Magadhi language is used in the edicts in the eastern part of the sub-continent, which is probably the official language of Ashoka's court.
Ashoka's edicts have survived over the period of centuries is because they are written on the rocks and stone pillars.
www.indiaprofile.com /monuments-temples/ashokainscriptions.htm   (705 words)

  
 The Edicts of King Asoka
Asoka's edicts are mainly concerned with the reforms he instituted and the moral principles he recommended in his attempt to create a just and humane society.
The language used in the edicts found in the eastern part of the sub-continent is a type of Magadhi, probably the official language of Asoka's court.
The language used in the edicts found in the western part of India is closer to Sanskrit although one bilingual edict in Afghanistan is written in Aramaic and Greek.
www.accesstoinsight.org /lib/authors/dhammika/wheel386.html   (0 words)

  
 Ashoka @AryanaSite.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
After eight years as king, Ashoka conquered Kalinga (in modern Orissa), both to control a part of the subcontinent that was rich in ores and agrarian revenue, and to secure the sea route along the east coast to the Krishna valley, where major gold fields and veins of semi-precious stones were located.
It was after the 12th year of his reign that Ashoka began to issue his edicts, in which he referred to his policies, concerns, and administrative changes, and his aspirations of instituting a new social ethic.
Apart from emphasizing the importance of tolerance in relation to diverse ideologies, Ashoka's definition of social ethics is based on a respect for all religious teachers, and on a harmonious relationship between parents and children, teachers and pupils, and employers and employees.
www.aryanasite.com /afghanistan/relatedarticles/ashoka3.htm   (381 words)

  
 Edicts of Ashoka
Ashoka ("without sorrow" in Sanscrit) (290-232 BC) (no portrait or sculpture known) lived in the Ganges river valley where he succeeded his father and grandfather to rule as King for 42 peaceful years an India larger than 19th-C British India.
Content aside, Ashoka's texts have survived because they were cut into rock; the Fourteen Rock Texts in boulders & cliff faces, while the Pillars (of which 10 are known and at least 6 lost) were cut from the stone quarries of the Chunar Hills near Banaras.
Although his language was unornate and almost rough, Ashoka encouraged a knowledge of the ethical elements common to Buddhism and Brahmanism and did not propagandise for Buddhism as a separate and rival religion.
www.tphta.ws /TPH_ASOK.HTM   (2032 words)

  
 Ashoka
A follower of Buddhism, Ashoka established monuments marking several significant sites in the life of Shakyamuni Buddha, and according to Buddhist tradition was closely involved in the preservation and transmission of Buddhism.
Ashoka was the son of the Maurya Emperor Bindusara by a relatively lower ranked queen named Dharma.
Ashoka, at this time, was already married to Asandhimitra who was to be his much-loved chief queen for many years till her death.
www.dejavu.org /cgi-bin/get.cgi?ver=93&url=http://articles.gourt.com/%22http%3A%2F%2Farticles.gourt.com%2F%3Farticle%3DAshoka   (3385 words)

  
 Edicts of Ashoka
According to the edicts, the extent of Buddhist proselytism during this period reached as far as the Mediterranean, and many Buddhist monuments were created.
In these inscriptions, Ashoka refers to himself as "Beloved of the Gods" and "King Priya-darshi." The identification of King Priya-darshi with Ashoka was confirmed by an inscription discovered in 1915.
In order to propagate the Buddhist faith, Ashoka explains he sent emissaries to the Hellenistic kings as far as the Mediterranean, and to the peoples throughout India, claiming they were all converted to the Dharma as a result.
en.explicatus.org /wiki/Edicts_of_Ashoka   (2375 words)

  
 King Ashoka
Ashoka came to the throne circa 268 B.C. and died approximately 233 B.C. His memory endures in a series of rock and pillar inscriptions, which are found scattered in various parts of India.
The edicts cover topics such as kindness to animals, preservation of forest, every day virtues, proper treatment of prisoners, respect for all religions, civic procedures and morals.
In fact, King Ashoka coined the word "Dharma" which is variously spelled "Dhamma", as the collective word for his viewpoints.
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/buddhism/42285   (433 words)

  
 Informat.io on Edicts Of Ashoka
Ashoka also issued Edicts in the Greek language as well as in Aramaic.
The Dharma preached by Ashoka is explained mainly in term of moral precepts, based on the doing of good deeds, respect for others, generosity and purity.
Far from being sectarian, Ashoka, based on a belief that all religions shared a common, positive essence, encouraged tolerance and understanding of other religions.
www.informat.io /?title=edicts-of-ashoka   (2308 words)

  
 [No title]
This edict has been written for the following purpose: that the judicial officers of the city may strive to do their duty and that the people under them might not suffer unjust imprisonment or harsh treatment.
This edict is to be listened to every four months on Tisa day, between Tisa days, and on other suitable occasions, it should be listened to even by a single person.
This edict was found inscribed on a small rock near the town of Bairat and is now housed at the Asiatic Society in Calcutta.
departments.colgate.edu /greatreligions/pages/buddhanet/theravada/wheels/asoka386.txt   (7871 words)

  
 KING ASHOKA: His Edicts and His Times
These edicts, inscribed on rocks and pillars, proclaim Asoka's reforms and policies and promulgate his advice to his subjects.
The present rendering of these edicts, based on earlier translations, offers us insights into a powerful and capable ruler's attempt to establish an empire on the foundation of righteousness, a reign which makes the moral and spiritual welfare of his subjects its primary concern.
Others are to be found in or near important population centres so that their edicts could be read by as many people as possible.
www.cs.colostate.edu /~malaiya/ashoka.html   (0 words)

  
 Edicts of Ashoka
The Edicts of Ashoka are a collection of 33 inscriptions on the Pillars of Ashoka, as well as boulders and cave walls, made by the Emperor Ashoka of the Mauryan dynasty during his reign from 272 to 231 BCE.
In these inscriptions, Ashoka refers to himself as "Beloved of the Gods" and "King Priya-darshi." The identification of King Priya-darshi with Ashoka was confirmed by an inscription discovered in 1915.
Ashoka did not completely prohibit the killing of animals, but he prohibited gratuitous killings (such as for sacrifices), he advocated restraint in the number that had to be killed for consumption, protected some of them, and in general condemned violent acts against animals, such as castration.
www.ekenjy.co.za /wiki/Edicts_of_Ashoka   (2398 words)

  
 PuriOnline.com- Dhauli- The Edicts of Ashoka...
A duplicate of these Dhauli rock edicts is found on the surface of a rock in Jaugada, on the bank of river Rushikulya, to the north-west of Ganjam town in the Ganjam district of Orissa.
The Edict XIII refers to the conquest of Kalinga, the terrible massacre in that war, the King’s remorse, his desire for true conquest - the conquest by means of dhamma and not by force of arms - and his arrangements for ensuring that end.
The edicts were meant for the general public and for the king’s officers, and therefore, must have been inscribed close to a big town on or near the public highway.
www.purionline.com /dhauli.htm   (2179 words)

  
 Pillars of Ashoka   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Fragment of the 6th Pillar Edict of Ashoka (238 BCE), in Brahmi, sandstone.
The pillars of Ashoka are a series of columns dispersed throughout the northern Indian subcontinent, and erected by the Mauryan king Ashoka during his reign in the 3rd century BCE.
Many of the pillars are carved with proclamations reflecting Buddhist teachings: the Edicts of Ashoka.
buddhism.2be.net /Pillars_of_Ashoka   (426 words)

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