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Topic: Edmund Husserl


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  Edmund Husserl [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
Husserl suggested that only by suspending or bracketing away the "natural attitude" could philosophy becomes its own distinctive and rigorous science, and he insisted that phenomenology is a science of consciousness rather than of empirical things.
Edmund Husserl was born April 8, 1859, into a Jewish family in the town of Prossnitz in Moravia, then a part of the Austrian Empire.
Husserl has succeeded in distinguishing between natural and artificially synthesized wholes, on the one hand, and, on the other hand, those totalities that are known as having been accomplished neither by natural aggregation nor by mental combination.
www.iep.utm.edu /h/husserl.htm   (9021 words)

  
  Edmund Husserl - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Edmund Gustav Albrecht Husserl (April 8, 1859 - April 26, 1938, Freiburg) was a German philosopher, known as the "father" of phenomenology.
Husserl initially studied mathematics at the universities of Leipzig (1876) and Berlin (1878), under Karl Weierstrass and Leopold Kronecker.
Husserl proposed that the world of objects and ways in which we direct ourselves toward and perceive those objects is normally conceived of in what he called the "natural attitude", which is characterized by a belief that objects materially exist and exhibit properties that we see as emanating from them.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Edmund_Husserl   (1274 words)

  
 Edmund Husserl - Philosopher - Bibliography
Edmund Husserl was born in 1859, in the town of Prossnitz in Moravia.
Husserl came to the conclusion that consciousness requires an object for contemplation, it is a descriptive discipline that should strive for the description of "things in themselves," as opposed to the invention of theories.
Because Husserl was uncomfortable with the conceptualizing of grand theories; he overlooked the relationship of being as meaning presence, with its implicit sense of permanence, and in opposition to becoming, as transitoriness.
www.egs.edu /resources/husserl.html   (697 words)

  
 Edmund Husserl   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Husserl's approach is to study the units of consciousness that the respective speaker presents himself as having — that he “gives voice to” — in expressing the proposition in question (for instance, while writing a mathematical textbook or giving a lecture).
Husserl starts (again, from a first-person viewpoint) from a “solipsistic” abstraction of the notion of a spatio-temporal object which differs from that notion in that it does not presuppose that any other subject can observe such an object from his (or her) own perspective.
Husserl, Edmund (1950-) Husserliana: Edmund Husserl — Gesammelte Werke, The Hague/Dordrecht: Nijhoff/Kluwer.
plato.stanford.edu /entries/husserl   (6302 words)

  
 Edmund Husserl
Edmund Husserl was born April 8, 1859, into a Jewish family in the town of Prossnitz in Moravia, then a part of the Austrian Empire.
Husserl has succeeded in distinguishing between natural and artificially synthesized wholes, on the one hand, and, on the other hand, those totalities that are known as having been accomplished neither by natural aggregation nor by mental combination.
Husserl rightly points out that we are able to slide up and down the pole of the ego-beam at will, moving now toward the thing, now away from it to consider the act of knowing and its modalities.
www.steinschneider.com /biography/edmund_husserl.htm   (8580 words)

  
 Husserl.net
Search for key terms in Husserl's work, such as “noema,”; “horizon,” “zeit,” and “akt.” Sort results by year, book, etc. In this way you can track the development of Husserlian concepts over the course of his carreer.
Study and discuss key concepts from Husserlian phenomenology--zeit, raum, noema, reduktion, etc. Each entry includes references to key passages in the primary and secondary literature, quotes from the same, and interactive discussion.
Chronology of Husserl’s life and works, as well as those of predecessors and successors.
www.husserl.net   (189 words)

  
 Glossary of People: Hu   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Husserl received a decisive impetus from Brentano and his circle of students where the spirit of the Enlightenment, with its religious tolerance and its quest for a rational philosophy, was very much alive.
Husserl made an intensive study of the British Empiricists, such as Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and J S Mill, and the logic and semantics stemming from this tradition, especially the logic of Mill, and studied the attempts at a "psycho-logic" grounding of logic then being made in Germany.
Husserl later acknowledged that his encounter with Dilthey had turned his attention to the historical life out of which all of the sciences originated and that, in so doing, it had opened for him the dimension of history as the foundation of every theory of knowledge.
www.marxists.org /glossary/people/h/u.htm   (1711 words)

  
 Edmund Husserl [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
Husserl locates the origin of multiplicity in the activity of combining, which he takes to be a psychological process.
Husserl, however, tries to produce the concept number by suppressing what he has taken to be the absolute indetermination of the something-series.
Husserl works on this question in # 15b, where "the spatial body is a synthetic unity of a manifold of strata of 'sensuous appearances' of different senses" (42-43).
www.utm.edu /research/iep/h/husserl.htm   (8563 words)

  
 Edmund Husserl (1859-1938)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Husserl, Edmund (1859-1938), German philosopher, founder of phenomenology.
Husserl was born in Prossnitz, Moravia (now in the Czech Republic), on April 8, 1859.
In this book, regarded as a radical departure in philosophy, he contended that the philosopher's task is to contemplate the essences of things, and that the essence of an object can be arrived at by systematically varying that object in the imagination.
www.csun.edu /~vcoao087/husserl.htm   (473 words)

  
 Edmund Husserl: Philosophy and the Crisis of European Humanity
Husserl, however, speaks of europäischen Menschentums, which, as will be seen later, must be translated as 'European man' if the rest of the text is to make sense.
Husserl would not like to admit that the differences are due to essential differences in the disciplines themselves.
Husserl's judgment of 'phychologism' was no less severe at the end of his life than it was when he wrote 'Philosophy as Rigorous Science'.
www.users.cloud9.net /~bradmcc/husserl_philcris.html   (14061 words)

  
 Edmund Husserl
Edmund Husserl was the principal founder of phenomenology -- and thus one of the most influential philosophers of the 20
Husserl's approach is to study the units of consciousness that the respective speaker presents himself as having -- that he “gives voice to” -- in expressing the proposition in question (for instance, while writing a mathematical textbook or giving a lecture).
Husserl, Edmund (1950-) Husserliana: Edmund Husserl -- Gesammelte Werke, The Hague/Dordrecht: Nijhoff/Kluwer.
www.seop.leeds.ac.uk /archives/sum2003/entries/husserl   (6213 words)

  
 Ralph Dumain: "The Autodidact Project": Marvin Farber: Edmund Husserl and the Aims of Phenomenology
Certainly Husserl was one of the most seminal philosophical minds in the last century, and he is sure to be intensively studied and critically discussed in the coming generations.
Edmund Husserl was born in Czechoslovakia in 1859, and studied in Berlin and Vienna.
Husserl's early use of the term "phenomenology" was either anticipated or independently introduced at about the same time by the American philosopher, C. Peirce, who also used the term "phaneroscopy." The predecessors of Husserl in the great tradition of the history of philosophy are to be traced all the way back to Plato.
www.autodidactproject.org /other/farber6.html   (4145 words)

  
 Existential Primer: Edmund Husserl
Edmund Husserl was the leading thinker in the Phenomenological Movement, influencing most future existentialists either directly or indirectly.
According to Husserl, the goal of philosophy was to describe the data of consciousness without bias or prejudice, ignoring all metaphysical and scientific theories in order to accurately describe and analyze the data gathered by human senses and the mind.
Husserl considered it a great mystery and wonder that a group of beings was aware of their existence, in effect human consciousness is the phenomenological result of introspection.
www.tameri.com /csw/exist/husserl.shtml   (1428 words)

  
 Edmund Husserl
Husserl distinguishes between the noetic--that which experiences, the experiencing--and the noematic--that which is experienced, being experienced.
Husserl asks how we can agree on what a particular object is. He appeals to a collective sense or category--in a kind of Platonic move--which he calls the transcendent, the realm of "essence" or eidoV.
What Husserl appears to be doing is taking the cogito of Descartes and universalizing it as a transcendent cogito, a consciousness that constitutes the entire universe through its perception--a Vishnu, whose dream is the universe, sleeping on his cosmic lotus.
www.brysons.net /academic/husserl.html   (615 words)

  
 Edmund Husserl
Husserl began his academic career studying mathematics at both Leipzig and Berlin under the tutelage of both Carl Weierstrass and Leopold Kronecker, and then moving on to complete his PhD thesis, "Contributions to the Theory of the Calculus of Variations," at Vienna.
As influential as Husserl's thought has been, it is odd that he did not actually seriously begin his training in philosophy until after his PhD work, although in the past he had read David Hume with a great deal of enthusiasm and had attended Friedrich Paulsen's lectures on Kantian idealism.
Husserl was eventually stripped of his German citizenship, and was prohibited from publishing anything inside of Germany.
www.nndb.com /people/247/000059070   (949 words)

  
 Island of Freedom - Edmund Husserl
Edmund Husserl was a German philosopher and founder of phenomenology.
Thus, although phenomenology does not assume the existence of anything, it is nonetheless a descriptive discipline; according to Husserl, phenomenology is devoted, not to inventing theories, but rather to describing the "things themselves," which is not unlike the philosophy of Kant, an affinity of which Husserl himself was fully conscious.
Husserl's relatively cognitive phenomenological method was transformed by Heidegger into an existentialism that dealt with the emotional and ethical significances of life as well as its perceptual, intellectual, and logical structures.
www.island-of-freedom.com /HUSSERL.HTM   (628 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Edmund Husserl (Philosophy, Biography) - Encyclopedia
Edmund Husserl[et´moont hoos´url] Pronunciation Key, 1859–1938, German philosopher, founder of the phenomenological movement (see phenomenology).
Husserl concluded that consciousness has no life apart from the objects it considers.
In his later work, Husserl moved toward idealism and denied that objects exist outside consciousness.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/H/Husserl.html   (273 words)

  
 Edmund Husserl --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Edmund Husserl, the German philosopher, used the term Phenomenology to name a whole philosophy.
In order to rid his transcendental investigation of empirical prejudgments and to discover connections of meaning that are necessary truths underlying both physical and psychological sciences, Husserl bracketed and suspended all judgments of existence and empirical causation.
Edmund Husserl (1859–1939), a German mathematician turned philosopher, was the true father of Phenomenology.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9041632?tocId=9041632   (762 words)

  
 Philosophy - The New School for Social Research
Established in 1966 in memory of Alfred Schutz, The Husserl Archives at the Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science is a research center for phenomenology and phenomenological philosophy under the direction of the Department of Philosophy.
The center is in possession of a complete collection of transcriptions of Edmund Husserl's unpublished writings, currently located in the Raymond Fogelman Library.
The purpose of the Husserl Archives is to promote and facilitate research in the work of Husserl in particular and phenomenological philosophy generally.
www.newschool.edu /gf/phil/husserl-archive.htm   (144 words)

  
 Philosophers : Edmund Husserl   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Husserl immersed himself in the study of logic from 1890-1900, and he soonafter produced another text: Logical Investigations(1901).
Husserl attempted to shift the focus of philosophy away from large scale theorization, towards a more precise study of discrete phenomena, ideas and simple events.
Husserl aided philosophy, breaking the Cartesian trap of dualism with new ideas like intensionality.
www.trincoll.edu /depts/phil/philo/phils/husserl.html   (231 words)

  
 The Husserl Archives   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Established in 1966 in memory of Alfred Schutz, The Husserl Archives at The New School for Social Research is a research center for phenomenology and phenomenological philosophy under the direction of the Department of Philosophy.
The Husserl Archives at the New School is currently in the process of updating and organizing its collection of transcriptions of Husserl's unpublished works.
The topic of the Seminar for Fall 2005 will be "Husserl and Kant." If you would like to participate in the Husserl Seminar, please contact Professor James Dodd at doddj@newschool.edu.
www.newschool.edu /gf/phil/husserl   (328 words)

  
 Edmund Husserl --  Britannica Concise Encyclopedia - The online encyclopedia you can trust!
From 1883 to 1886 he studied with Franz Brentano, whose descriptive psychology prompted Husserl to reflect on the psychological sources of basic mathematical concepts.
In 1916 Husserl accepted a professorship at the University of Freiburg, where Martin Heidegger was one of his students; when Husserl retired in 1928, Heidegger succeeded to his chair.
After 1933, when the Nazis seized power in Germany, Husserl was excluded from the university because of his Jewishness.
www.britannica.com /ebc/article-9367617?tocId=9367617   (948 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Logical Investigations, Volume 1 (International Library of Philosophy): Books: Edmund Husserl,Dermot ...   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Husserl says something that constitutes philosophical cliche' and we're supposed to award him with a medal of academic honor.
It is "generally understood" that Husserl's early work is irrelevant by contemporary standards, but on a considered view of intellectual history this is wrong: in fact, the philosophical doctrine known as "anti-psychologism" was nowhere as effectively expounded as in the *Prolegomena To Pure Logic*, the first "book" of the *Philosophical Investigations*.
Husserl's expository prose there is lucid and compelling, even in fact (as he admits) in contradistinction to the rest of this rather massive book; the six studies which follow seem today to be by turns antediluvian and futuristic.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0415241898?v=glance   (1022 words)

  
 Edmund Husserl   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Husserl saw phenomenology as a psychology that distinctly separated the physical from the psychical and concentrated its attention on the psychical.
Husserl attempted to shift the focus of philosophy away from large scale theorization, towards a more precise study of discrete phenomena,ideas and simple events.
Husserl aided philosophy, breaking the Cartesian trap of dualism with new ideas like intentionality.
home.earthlink.net /~potterama/Michele/projects/hyper/husserl.html   (264 words)

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