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Topic: Edsger Dijkstra


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In the News (Mon 22 Apr 19)

  
  Edsger Dijkstra   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Edsger Wybe Dijkstra (Rotterdam, May 11, 1930 – Nuenen, August 6, 2002) was a Dutch computer scientist.
Dijkstra was known to be a fan of Algol60, and worked on the team that implemented the first compiler for that language.
Dijkstra objected that the resulting proofs are long and cumbersome, and that the proof gives no insight as to how the program was developed.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Edsger_Dijkstra.html   (394 words)

  
 Dijkstra's algorithm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Dijkstra's algorithm, named after its discoverer, Dutch computer scientist Edsger Dijkstra, is an algorithm that solves the single-source shortest path problem for a directed graph with nonnegative edge weights.
The basic operation of Dijkstra's algorithm is edge relaxation: if there is an edge from u to v, then the shortest known path from s to u (d[u]) can be extended to a path from s to v by adding edge (u,v) at the end.
The A* algorithm is a generalization of Dijkstra's algorithm that cuts down on the size of the subgraph that must be explored, if additional information is available that provides a lower-bound on the "distance" to the target.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dijkstra's_algorithm   (1302 words)

  
 Edsger_Dijkstra
Dijkstra studied theoretical physics at the University of Leiden, but he quickly realized he was more interested in programming than physics.
Dijkstra was known to be a fan of ALGOL 60, and worked on the team that implemented the first compiler for that language.
Dijkstra was known for his forthright opinions on programming, and for his habit of carefully composing manuscripts with his fountain pen.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/e/ed/edsger_dijkstra.html   (719 words)

  
 Edsger Dijkstra
Edsger Wybe Dijkstra (May 30, 1930 - August 6, 2002) was a Dutch computer scientist.
Dijkstra studied theoretical physics[?] at the University of Leiden.
He was known for his low opinion of the GOTO statement in computer programming, culminating in the 1968 article Go To Statement Considered Harmful, which is regarded as a major step towards the widespread deprecation of the GOTO statement (which was effectively replaced by control structures like do...while, repeat..until).
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ed/Edsger_Dijkstra.html   (187 words)

  
 MUF Mastery - Edsger W. Dijkstra   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Dijkstra is one of the grand old men of the post-WW II generation that built modern computing, contributing for example to the first implementation of Algol-60, ancestor to most of today's infix programming languages.
Dijkstra is one of a number of brilliant early contributors to practical hardware and software engineering who subsequently became very dissatisfied with the perpetually bug-ridden state of the art, and turned to the study of ways of producing demonstrably correct computing systems.
Dijkstra seems to me to have something of the shrillness of a brilliant pioneer feeling ignored and bypassed by the mainstream, but he is a profound analyst and synthesist who cares deeply about correctness, elegance and beauty in computing, and careful attention to him can hardly fail to deepen one's own understanding.
laurel.actlab.utexas.edu /~cynbe/muq/muf3_17.html   (1109 words)

  
 E.W.Dijkstra Archive: Home page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Edsger Wybe Dijkstra was one of the most influential members of computing science's founding generation.
An interview with Dijkstra (Spanish translation here) was conducted in 1985 by Rogier F. van Vlissingen, who has also written a personal reflection on "Dijkstra's sense of what computer science and programming are and what they aren't".
Dijkstra's death in August 2002 was marked by many obituaries and memorials, including the Computer Sciences department's memorial celebration.
www.cs.utexas.edu /users/EWD   (753 words)

  
 Guardian | Edsger Dijkstra
Edsger Dijkstra, who has died of cancer aged 72, was a computer programming pioneer and penetrating thinker, who would throw off such remarks as: "The question of whether computers can think is like the question of whether submarines can swim." His popular fame rested on the phrase "Go To considered harmful".
Dijkstra was born in Rotterdam; his father was a chemist, his mother a mathematician.
Dijkstra believed that the first challenge for computer science was to discover how to maintain order in a finite, but very large, universe; the second was to turn what you learned into a teachable discipline.
www.guardian.co.uk /print/0,3858,4484178-103684,00.html   (729 words)

  
 Edsger Dijkstra   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Dijkstra studied theoretical physics at the University of Leiden, but he quickly realized he was more interested in programming.
Dijkstra was known for his essays on programming; he was the first to make the claim that programming is so inherently difficult and complex that programmers need to harness every trick and abstraction possible in hopes of managing the complexity of it successfully.
Dijkstra would distribute photocopies of a new EWD among his colleagues; as many recipients photocopied and forwarded their copy, the EWDs spread throughout the international computer science community (see EWD1000).
www.tocatch.info /en/Edsger_Dijkstra.htm   (821 words)

  
 Edsger Dijkstra   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Dijkstra was born in 1930 in Rotterdam, Netherlands.
Dijkstra’s academic credentials are impressive: He worked as a programmer at the Mathematisch Centrum in Amsterdam from 1952 to 1962 and was professor of Mathematics at Eindhoven University of Technology for more than twenty years and was the Burroughs Corporation research fellow from 1973 to 1984.
Dijkstra and his wife explored national and regional parks in their Volkswagen bus that they had named the Touring Machine, a twist on the name of the famous Turing Machine.
www.rit.edu /~maa2454/edsger_dijkstra.htm   (838 words)

  
 Edsger Dijkstra   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Edsger Wybe Dijkstra (Rotterdam, 11 mei 1930 - Nuenen 6 augustus 2002) was een Nederlands wiskundige en informaticus die veel voor de informatica heeft gedaan, met name op het gebied van gestructureerd programmeren.
In andere bewoording: Het knooppunt dat gekozen wordt, maakt deel...
Na het gestructureerd programmeren waarvan Edsger Dijkstra de grote voorvechter was is de volgende grote ontwikkeling het object-georiënteerd programmeren geworden; zowel van C als van Pascal zijn object-geörienteerde...
edsger-dijkstra.nl.exsugo.org   (740 words)

  
 School of Information Science - Hall of Fame
Dijkstra worked as a programmer at the Mathematisch Centrum, Amsterdam, from 1952 to 1962; was professor of mathematics, Eindhoven University of Technology, from 1962 to 1984; and was a Burroughs Corporation research fellow from 1973 to 1984.
Dijkstra was the 1972 recipient of the A.M. Turing Award of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).
Dijkstra was famous for his way with words, such as in his remark, "The question of whether computers can think is like the question of whether submarines can swim." The Oxford English Dictionary cites his use of the words "vector" and "stack" in a computing context.
www.sis.pitt.edu /~mbsclass/hall_of_fame/dijkstra.html   (342 words)

  
 Memorial Resolution - Edsger Wybe Dijkstra   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Dijkstra was born in 1930 in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, the son of a chemist father and a mathematician mother.
Dijkstra formulated and solved the Shortest Path problem for a demonstration at the official inauguration of the ARMAC computer in 1956, but —because of the absence of journals dedicated to automatic computing— did not publish the result until 1959.
Dijkstra appreciated the importance of recursion, and he was probably the first to introduce the notion of a “stack” for translating recursive programs.
www.utexas.edu /faculty/council/2002-2003/memorials/Dijkstra/dijkstra.html   (7495 words)

  
 BookRags: Edsger Wybe Dijkstra Biography
Dijkstra was born in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, to educated parents: his father was a chemist working as a chemistry teacher and superintendent, and his mother was a mathematician.
Dijkstra was a principal contributor during the late 1950s in the development and implementation of Algol-60, a high level programming language that Dijkstra was instrumental in making mathematically correct.
Dijkstra is a Foreign Honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a Distinguished Fellow of the British Computer Society.
www.bookrags.com /biography/edsger-wybe-dijkstra-wcs   (907 words)

  
 LtU Classic Archives
Edsger Dijkstra was one of the true pioneers of computer science, with ground breaking contributions ranging over the entire field.
Dijkstra was not interested only in algorithms in the abstract, and gave a lot of attention to the construction of working software.
Dijkstra remarked: 'We use the name "parameters" for all the information that is presented to the subroutine when it is called in by the main program; function arguments, if any, are therefore parameters.
lambda-the-ultimate.org /classic/message3978.html   (626 words)

  
 In memoriam: Edsger W. Dijkstra - Brian's Casio Calculator Corner
Dijkstra is perhaps most famous among practitioners for one of his shortest works.
Dijkstra famously said, “Computer Science is no more about computers than astronomy is about telescopes.” Despite this, the thought processes we go through to use our tools are shaped by the tools themselves.
Dijkstra elegantly proved the probability the shores remain connected is ½.
www.brianhetrick.com /casio/pdijk1.html   (340 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Edsger Wybe Dijkstra (May 11, 1930 - August 6, 2002) was a Dutch computer scientist.
Edsger Dijkstra is frequently quoted about computer science, for example, "The question of whether a computer can think is no more interesting than the question of whether a submarine can swim," and "Computer science is no more about computers than astronomy is about telescopes." See also Edsger Dijkstra at Wikiquote.
E. Dijkstra, Go To Statement Considered Harmful, Communications of the ACM, Vol.
www.wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/e/ed/edsger_dijkstra.html   (146 words)

  
 AIP International Catalog of Sources   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Edsger Wybe Dijkstra (1930-2002) was a teacher and researcher of computer science.
Dijkstra worked as a programmer (1952-1962) and professor (1962-1984) in The Netherlands, and was also a Burroughs Corporation research fellow (1973-1984).
Dijkstra is known for connecting mathematical logic to computer programming, as well as for general contributions to mathematical methodology.
www.aip.org /history/catalog/icos/27705.html   (201 words)

  
 Edsger Dijkstra
Image of Edsger Dijkstra courtesy of Brian Randell.
(The famous title of the paper was not the work of Dijkstra, but by Niklaus Wirth, editor of Communications of the ACM at the time.)
E.W. Dijkstra, Go To Statement Considered Harmful, Communications of the ACM, Vol.
www.teachtime.com /en/wikipedia/e/ed/edsger_dijkstra.html   (204 words)

  
 Press release Lecture Edsger Dijkstra, 10 Oct. 2000
Edsger Dijkstra was van 1952 tot 1962 in dienst van het CWI, toen nog Mathematisch Centrum geheten.
Prof.dr. Krzysztof Apt, Prof.dr. Edsger Dijkstra and dr.ir.
Prof.dr. Dijkstra is Professor Emeritus of the University of Texas at Austin.
www.cwi.nl /pr/press-releases/2000/Dijkstra-1000.html   (403 words)

  
 Computer science pioneer Dijkstra dies | CNET News.com
Dijkstra was on the committee that created Algol, the first block-structured programming language and one that introduced many ideas behind Pascal, Basic and C. His practical skills, especially in discerning and coding algorithms, were also remarkable--he wrote the first Algol 60 compiler.
Dijkstra and his wife also enjoyed exploring U.S. state and national parks in their Volkswagen camper van, called the Touring Machine.
Dijkstra was the 1972 recipient of the Association for Computing Machinery's Turing Award, often viewed as the Nobel Prize for computing.
news.com.com /2100-1001-949023.html   (595 words)

  
 Edgser W. Djkstra
In 1968 Edsger Dijkstra(7) laid the foundation stone in the march towards creating structure in the domain of programming by writing, not a scholarly paper on the subject, but instead a letter to the editor entitled "GO TO Statement Considered Harmful".
Edsger Wybe Dijkstra was born in Rotterdam, Netherlands in 1930.
Dijkstra is often written as Dykstra, 'ij' is a combination of letters in the Dutch language sounding like the 'i' in 'dike'.
www.thocp.net /biographies/dijkstra_edsger.htm   (881 words)

  
 GOTO considered joyful - Salon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Hacker's Dictionary was my first encounter with pioneering computer scientist Edsger Wybe Dijkstra, but thanks to the dedicated work of volunteers at the University of Texas at Austin, it was very far from my last.
Born in the Netherlands in 1930, Dijkstra was a witty and thoroughly engaging writer in his nonnative English ("I have learned to be very suspicious of ideas I cannot express well in both Dutch and English," he noted, late in life.
Dijkstra makes various good arguments against the use of images in thinking about geometry and mathematics and programming (diagrams are invariably overspecific, for example, and in set theory may be actively misleading.) He concludes:
www.salon.com /tech/feature/2003/07/09/dijkstra/index_np.html   (903 words)

  
 Foredragsholdere
Edsger Wybe Dijkstra has been around since the first days of computing science; and he has always been —and still is— a pioneer in the formulation of simple, elegant, constructive, crystal clear and beautiful solutions for fundamental —and at the same time practically relevant— problems in computing science.
This award was made almost three decades ago, before Dijkstra’s seminal work on weakest preconditions and the formal development of programs, his development of a propositional calculus and equational logic, and all his work on method in mathematics.
Dijkstra’s influence can be attributed to a penetrating mind; a rare intellectual honesty, which does not allow him to compromise his principles; and a way with words that few computing scientists can match.
www.dmlf.dk /aarsmoede/2000/foredragsholdere.html   (505 words)

  
 CS 313 - Edsger Wybe Dijkstra   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Edsger W. Dijkstra was born in 1930 in the city of Rotterdam, Netherlands to well educated parents consequently Dijkstra received a good education in his youth.
Edsger Dijkstra is most notable known from the algorithm that bares his name, also known as the "shortest-path algorithm".
Dijkstra also worked on the the problem of deadlock in an operating system, deadlock occurs when multiple programs compete for limited hardware resources.
cs.wlu.edu /~whaleyt/classes/313/Turing/Grieco-Dijkstra.htm   (399 words)

  
 Computable Nieuws: 30/07/99 - Edsger Dijkstra: Vader van gestructureerd programmeren
In de strijd om het oplossen van het zogenoemde handelsreizigersprobleem ontwikkelde Dijkstra in 1956 het 'kortste pad algoritme', waarmee de kortste weg kan worden berekend die een handelsreiziger af moet leggen om twintig, dertig, honderd of een ander willekeurig aantal steden te bezoeken.
Sinds IBM hetzelfde principe in zijn 360-architectuur toepast, is alle chiptechnologie verrijkt met Dijkstra's vinding.
Dijkstra heeft de software-industrie veel discipline bijgebracht, zeker met zijn uitspraak: "Goto considered harmful." Daarmee bedoelt hij dat naarmate een computerprogramma meer goto-commando's bevat, het moeilijker is de broncode te doorgronden.
www.computable.nl /artikels/archief9/d30rv9qw.htm   (512 words)

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