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Topic: Edward Bernays


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  Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Edward Bernays
Edward Bernays (November 22, 1891 - March 9, 1995) is regarded by many as the "father of public relations," although some people believe that title properly belongs to some other early PR practitioner, such as Ivy Lee[?].
Born in Vienna, Bernays was a nephew of Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, and his public relations efforts helped popularize Freud’s theories in the United States.
In a letter to President Franklin Roosevelt, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter[?] described Bernays and Ivy Lee as "professional poisoners of the public mind, exploiters of foolishness, fanaticism and self-interest." And history itself showed the flaw in Bernays’s claim that "manipulation of the masses" is natural and necessary in a democratic society.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/ed/Edward_Bernays?title=American_Tobacco_Company   (863 words)

  
  Edward Bernays
Edward Bernays (November 22, 1891 - March 9, 1995) is regarded by many as the "father of public relations," although some people believe that title properly belongs to some other early PR practitioner, such as Ivy Lee[?].
Born in Vienna, Bernays was a nephew of Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, and his public relations efforts helped popularize Freud’s theories in the United States.
In a letter to President Franklin Roosevelt, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter[?] described Bernays and Ivy Lee as "professional poisoners of the public mind, exploiters of foolishness, fanaticism and self-interest." And history itself showed the flaw in Bernays’s claim that "manipulation of the masses" is natural and necessary in a democratic society.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ed/Edward_Bernays.html   (838 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Edward Bernays   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Edward Bernays (November 22, 1891 – March 9, 1995) nephew of psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, was considered the father of the field of public relations.
Bernays was one of the first to attempt to manipulate public opinion using the psychology of the subconscious.
Bernays, however, was a philosopher of promotion, and it was probably that philosophical quality, evident in his writings and speeches, as well as the sheer exuberant creativity and intelligence of his publicity blitzes, which enabled him to impart to his own efforts and to the field more generally a sense of stature, scope and profundity.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Edward_Bernays   (2351 words)

  
 The father of public relations: Edward L. Bernays. (Section 1: Drawing from the Past to Build the Future) - ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Edward L. Bernays' progressive ideas and creative innovations have greatly affected the lives and behavior of the public, and have earned him the title of 'father of public relations.' Bernays is credited with creating the term 'public relations counselor' and with turning the field of public relations into an industry.
Outside the public relations field, where Bernays is a legend, people such as Povich who have never heard of him, are fascinated to learn how his radical ideas and brilliant innovations have influenced their lives and behavior.
Bernays, who taught what was probably the first course ever in public relations, in New York University's School of Business and Finance, says: "I purposely didn't give it in the school of journalism.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1G1-11882652.html   (1665 words)

  
 Edward Bernays, 'Father of Public Relations' And Leader in Opinion Making, Dies at 103
Bernays was one of the first people to expand what had been a narrow concept of press agentry, or working to influence government policy, into a far more ambitious -- and controversial -- realm of seeking to influence and change public opinion and behavior.
Bernays, a nephew of Sigmund Freud, was born in Vienna, grew up in New York and made the city his longtime home and base for his public relations work.
Bernays was also a philanthropist, served on numerous boards and committees in various fields, and received honorary degrees and many awards for his work.
partners.nytimes.com /books/98/08/16/specials/bernays-obit.html   (782 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Bernays was also a far-sighted architect of modern propaganda techniques who, dramatically, from the early 1920s onward, helped to consolidate a fateful marriage between theories of mass psychology and schemes of corporate and political persuasion.
Bernays' take on public relations was remarkable in that it tended to ignore the particular processes, or details, of the periods which had given rise to it.
Bernays was the child of an haute bourgeois world that was, in many ways, still captivated by aristocratic styles of wealth, where relations between the classes were marked, to a large extent, by deep-seated patterns of allegiance of obedience and obligation between masters and servants.
www.beyond-the-pale.co.uk /bernays.htm   (4298 words)

  
 Edward Bernays - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Born in Vienna, Bernays was both a blood nephew and a nephew-in-law to Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, and Bernays's public relations efforts helped popularize Freud's theories in the United States.
PR is a 20th-century phenomenon, and Bernays -- widely eulogized as the "father of public relations" at the time of his death in 1995 -- played a major role in defining the industry's philosophy and methods.
Bernays is held in high regard by some and thoroughly despised by others even today, and was even named as one of the 1,000 most influential people of all time.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Edward_Bernays   (1320 words)

  
 The Father of Spin: Edward L. Bernays & The Birth of PR - Center for Media and Democracy
Bernays regarded Uncle Sigmund as a mentor, and used Freud's insights into the human psyche and motivation to design his PR campaigns, while also trading on his famous uncle's name to inflate his own stature.
Bernays, by contrast, used psychological techniques to mask the motives of his clients, as part of a deliberate strategy aimed at keeping the public unconscious of the forces that were working to mold their minds.
Bernays relished and apparently never regretted his work for United Fruit, for which he was reportedly paid $100,000 a year, a huge fee in the early 1950s.
www.prwatch.org /prwissues/1999Q2/bernays.html   (1572 words)

  
 Larry Tye, Author & Journalist
Edward Bernays almost single-handedly fashioned the craft that has come to be called public relations.
Bernays was the man who, more than any other, got women to smoke and who put bacon and eggs on breakfast tables, Ivory in soapdishes, books in bookshelves, and Calvin Coolidge back in the White House.
I met Edward Bernays only once-on a sweltering summer afternoon a year before his death, when he was a very old man. Sitting in the library of the rambling white Victorian house in Cambridge that was his home for more than thirty years, he rambled on.
www.larrytye.com /fatherofspinpreface.html   (1306 words)

  
 Edward L. Bernays Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
Edward L. Bernays was born in Vienna, Austria, on November 22, 1891.
The elder Bernays had hopes that his son would one day join him on the grain exchange, but by the time of Edward's graduation from Cornell in 1912 he had decided to pursue a career as a journalist.
Bernays earned his greatest fame through his promotion, for the electrical industry, of the 50th anniversary of the light bulb in 1929.
www.bookrags.com /biography/edward-l-bernays   (1127 words)

  
 BU Bridge News - Week of 6 November 1998
Edward Bernays (Hon.'66), often referred to as the father of PR, is even credited with creating and naming the field of public relations.
Edward Bernays (center) visited COM in 1992, soon after he turned 100 years old, to announce a $5,000 increase in the endowment of the annual Primus Inter Pares Scholarship that he created.
Bernays established the annual Primus Inter Pares Scholarship bearing his name, to recognize the COM student who contributes the most to the field of public relations and to BU's chapter of the Public Relations Society of America.
www.bu.edu /bridge/archive/1998/11-06/features3.html   (1206 words)

  
 World-Information.Org
Edward L. Bernays, one of the founders of modern public relations.
Born 1891 in Vienna, Bernays was one of the founders of modern public relations.
Bernays considered the manipulation of public opinion as an important element of mass democracies and was of the opinion that only through PR a society's order can be kept.
world-information.org /wio/infostructure/100437611652/100438658049/?ic=100446323988   (261 words)

  
 Pulse
One of the founding fathers of PR was Edward Bernays, a nephew of Sigmund Freud.
Bernays maintained, “If we understand the mechanism and motives of the group mind, it is now possible to regiment the masses according to our will without their knowing it.” He referred to that as the “engineering of consent.”
It was Bernays who pulled off one of the great early PR stunts, one still taught in schools.
www.pulsethebook.com /index.php?tag=edward-bernays   (509 words)

  
 The Century of the Self Movie Review | Edward Bernays | Documentary Reviews | DVD Movie Reviews | Cinema de Merde
Bernays hired a bunch of women to pose as suffragettes in a parade, and had them pull out cigarettes in front of a group of reporters, calling them “torches of freedom.” He succeeded in making women's smoking an issue of women's rights, and women never went back.
One example given of Bernays' work in the 50s came when a ruler came to power in Guatemala and promised to get rid of all the US companies in the country, which controlled their large banana business.
Advertisers did extensive focus groups [Bernays, by the way, also invented the focus group] and discovered that a great many of the people who became involved in the counterculture of the 60s weren't so much looking for political change so much as excited by the idea of personal expression.
www.cinemademerde.com /century_of_self.shtml   (1270 words)

  
 The Museum of Public Relations
Bernays was looking for an opportunity to prove to the public and his critics that public relations was indeed an honorable profession.
Edward Bernays had organized an event that had shown the world the potential of positive public relations.
Bernays later said, "Public relations had passed a milestone on the road to public understanding and respect." For here was a coordinated, planned effort which demonstrated that the consent of the public to an idea could be engineered if the time for the idea had come.
www.prmuseum.com /bernays/bernays_1929a.html   (493 words)

  
 'The Father Of Spin' by Larry Tye
Tye, a reporter at the Boston Globe, writes that Bernays convinced women that smoking in public was a form of liberation, yet he urged his wife to quit for health reasons.
The book overflows with Bernays' accomplishments and details about his life (even about his retirement home), but Tye fails to draw the facts together to paint a portrait of the man. There is little discussion of how, or why, Bernays did it all.
Bernays' strategy was to push the country to behave in ways that were favorable to his clients.
www.post-gazette.com /books/reviews/19980927review114.asp   (713 words)

  
 PR! A Social History Of Spin -Chapter 1
Bernays was also a far-sighted architect of modern propaganda techniques who, dramatically, from the early 1920s onward, helped to consolidate a fateful marriage between theories of mass psychology and schemes of corporate and political persuasion.
Bernays' take on public relations was remarkable in that it tended to ignore the particular processes, or details, of the periods which had given rise to it.
Bernays was the child of a bourgeois world that was, in many ways, still captivated by aristocratic styles of wealth, where relations between the classes were marked, to a large extent, by deep-seated patterns of allegiance-of obedience and obligation-between masters and servants.
www.bway.net /~drstu/chapter.html   (4292 words)

  
 Edward Bernays
Edward Bernays abrió su oficina de Relaciones Públicas en 1919 e inventó la denominación de "Consejo en Relaciones Públicas".
Edward Bernays afirma que de 1800 a 1865, las relaciones públicas estadounidenses siguieron evolucionando y pasaron, desde las primitivas artes del agente de prensa de la época colonial hasta ese ordenamiento claro y consciente ejecutado por Abraham Lincoln respecto de la opinión pública nacional y extranjera en pro de los interese de la unión.
EDWARD BERNAYS, habla de Ivy Lee como el padre de las RRPP.
www.rrppnet.com.ar /bernays.htm   (259 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Bernays took propaganda seriously for his career work: he combined individual and social psychology, public opinion studies, political persuasion and advertising to construct “necessary illusions” which filtered out to the masses as “reality.”
The methods invented and tried out in the war were too valuable for the uses of governments, factions, and special interests.' Sigmund Freud's nephew, Edward Bernays, took the techniques he learned in the CPI directly to Madison Avenue and became an outspoken proponent of propaganda as a tool for democratic government.
Edward Bernays [1891-1995] is also known as the Father of Spin (6) and the godfather of modern public relations (the "father" of public relations is Ivy Lee whose firm, Ivy Lee & T.J. Ross, was hired for $25,000 a year by the German conglomerate, I.G. Farben, which invited him to meet Hitler and Goebbels.
www.accd.edu /PAC/LRC/bernays.htm   (962 words)

  
 How Freud got under our skin | Review | The Observer
Bernays brought his uncle's books to America, found a publisher for them and discovered ingenious ways to advance the significance of their ideas in the mainstream press.
Bernays was among the first to understand that one of the implications of the subconscious mind was that it could be appealed to in order to sell products and ideas.
Bernays, particularly after the rise and fall of the Third Reich (Goebbels was an assiduous student of his methods), thought that the safest way of maintaining democracy was to distract people from dangerous political thought by letting them think that their real choices were as consumers.
observer.guardian.co.uk /review/story/0,6903,664666,00.html   (1849 words)

  
 Books: Stunt Man (The Boston Phoenix . 09-21-98)
Although Bernays did not invent public relations and was not completely responsible for its development, Tye argues that he was one of its most capable and influential champions.
In this and other campaigns, Tye explains, Bernays gained an edge over his competitors -- and helped reshape the way the publicity industry was run -- by drawing on the discipline of psychoanalysis to understand the market.
Bernays, he points out, benefited from outliving -- and thus out-talking -- his contemporaries, which often allowed him to overemphasize the success and influence of his theories and campaigns.
weeklywire.com /ww/09-21-98/boston_books_1.html   (616 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Propaganda: Books: Edward Bernays   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Edward Bernays is the utmost authority on the subject so much so that even the Germans in the Nazi political party used this book to spread their policy beliefs.
Edward Bernays runs through the psychology of developing public opinion and runs through several different areas where it could be applied from government to being implimented in the education system.
Bernays witnessed the coming of the industrial revolution in full and his ideas were thus shaped believing that even men operate only as mindless automatons in the larger machinery of society.
www.amazon.com /gp/product/0970312598/103-8851925-5832653?v=glance&n=283155&n=507846&s=books&v=glance   (1800 words)

  
 Edward Bernays Summary
Born in Vienna, Bernays was both a blood nephew and a nephew-in-law to Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, and Bernays's public relations efforts helped popularize Freud's theories in the United States.
Bernays drew upon his uncle Freud's psychoanalytic ideas for the benefit of commerce in order to promote, by indirection, commodities as diverse as cigarettes, soap and books.
PR is a 20th-century phenomenon, and Bernays-- widely eulogized as the "father of public relations" at the time of his death in 1995-- played a major role in defining the industry's philosophy and methods.
www.bookrags.com /Edward_Bernays   (2354 words)

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