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Topic: Egyptian soul


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In the News (Wed 21 Aug 19)

  
  Egyptian soul - Definition, explanation
A person's name (rn in Egyptian) was given to them at birth and would live for as long as that name was spoken, which explains why efforts were made to protect it, placing it in large amounts of writings.
Like a soul, the ba is a part of a person that lives after the body dies, and it is sometimes depicted as a human-headed bird flying out of the tomb to join with the ka in the afterlife.
Egyptian funerary literature (such as the Coffin Texts and the Book of the Dead were intended to aid the deceased in "not dying a second time" and becoming an akh.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/e/eg/egyptian_soul.php   (812 words)

  
  Egyptian Afterlife: The Soul's Journey to Egypt's Paradise - AAA Encyclopedia
The prowling egyptian jackal was regarded by the early peoples as the hunting scout of the lion.
Herodotus tells us that when a pet dog died the Egyptians went into mourning and shaved their heads and the whole of their bodies, and that there were sacred burial places for dogs.
This vigneete from the "Book of the Dead" of Hunefer shows the mummy before which the wife and daughter of Hunefer are weeping, while the high priest and his assistants perform the mystic rites; the god Anubis is also introduced, exbracing the mummy, to indicate that his protection is assured for the dead.
www.kenseamedia.com /encyclopedia/aaa/egyptian_afterlife_1.htm   (654 words)

  
 Egyptian soul
In Egyptian mythology, the human soul is made up of seven parts: the Ren, Sekem, the Akh, the Ba, the Ka, the Sheut, and the Sekhu.
Egyptians thought of the Akh, Ba and Ka as immortal aspects of the soul.
A person's name (ren in Egyptian) was given to them at birth and would live for as long as that name was spoken, which explains why efforts were made to protect it, placing it in large amounts of writings.
www.dejavu.org /cgi-bin/get.cgi?ver=93&url=http://articles.gourt.com/%22http%3A%2F%2Farticles.gourt.com%2F%3Farticle%3DKhu   (986 words)

  
 Egyptian Mythology - WiccanWeb.ca   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Egyptian mythology or Egyptian religion is the succession of tentative beliefs held by the people of Egypt for over three thousand years, prior to major exposure to Christianity and Islam.
In later belief, the soul of the deceased is led into a hall of judgement in Duat, by Anubis,god of mummification, and the deceased's heart, which was the record of the morality of the owner, is weighed against a single feather representing Maàt's (the concept of truth, and order).
Egyptian mythology put up surprisingly little resistance to the spread of Christianity, sometimes explained by claiming that Jesus was originally a syncretism based predominantly on Horus, with Isis representing Mary.
www.wiccanweb.ca /wiki/index.php/Egyptian_Mythology   (2073 words)

  
 Egyptian soul
In Egyptian mythology, the human soul is made up of five parts: the Ka, the Ba, the Akh, the Name and the Shadow.
In this system, the Akh went to the underworld and became the Ka again, while th Ba remained on Earth in the corpse of the deceased.
Ka The Ka was the spiritual soul of a person or a god, a type of mana.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/kh/Khu.html   (223 words)

  
 Egyptian soul - Free Encyclopedia of Thelema
In Egyptian mythology, the human soul is made up of five parts: the Ka, the Ba, the Akh, the Name and the Shadow.
The Ka was created by Mesenet along with the physical form of the person, and then continued to the underworld after the death of the physical body.
In an Egyptian tale, Helen came to Egypt and the priestesses of Hathor separated her Ka from her living being, and the Trojan War was actually fought over Helen's Ka, rather then Helen herself!
www.egnu.org /thelema/Egyptian_soul   (482 words)

  
 Brewer, E. Cobham. Dictionary of Phrase & Fable. Soul.
The Moslems say that the souls of the faithful assume the forms of snowwhite birds, and nestle under the throne of Allah until the resurrection.
Heracli’tus held the soul to be a spark of the soul to be a spark of the stellar essence: “scintilla stellaris essentiæ.
   Soul, in Egyptian hieroglyphics, is represented by several emblems, as a basket of fire, a heron, a hawk with a human face, and a ram.
www.bartleby.com /81/15685.html   (158 words)

  
 Yehuda & Tamar - A Chanukah Drama   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The ability to surrender one's ego to a higher truth is the foundation for all spiritual growth, as is the capacity to confess to an error or a wrongdoing.
In the Kabbala, the first-born is symbolic of the inital instincts and motives of a soul that lie beneath the surface of the conscious self.
The psychological interpretation of the soul's faculties in their constructive and destructive patterns is based on the writings of Chabad Chassidism.
www.ascent.org.il /cgi-bin/ascent.cgi?Name=j1462Plagues   (2197 words)

  
 'KA', AND EGYPTIAN MAGIC
There is a second kind of soul in Egyptian, the ba, or heart soul, and a third, the khu, or spirit soul, which is also the sign for radiance.
Egyptian thehen, lightning, and Greek thuo, sacrifice with fire, are near enough to suggest that sacrificial fire is the door to Re, or perhaps Re's fire is the doorway to immortality.
Osiris Auf-ankh prays to the soul lying prostrate in the body, "whose flame comes into being from out of the fire which blazes within the sea (or water) in such wise that the sea (water) is raised up on high out of the fire thereof...".
www.grazian-archive.com /quantavolution/QuantaHTML/vol_12/ka_13.htm   (4881 words)

  
 History of Egyptian Gods: Mountain Temple Center   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Sunset or the West, conversely, represented Death or Dis-incarnation, the journey of the soul from the land of the living (awake) into the land of the Dead (or sleeping), to await resurrection or reincarnation at some unspecified future date.
The Khemites spoke of the kha, the body of flesh; the ba, or moving soul; the ka, or focal spirit; and finally the akh, or divine self.
Souls of primordial, pre-dynastic pharaohs of Upper and Lower Egypt said to act as protectors of the incumbent pharaoh.
home.earthlink.net /~xristos/GoldenDawn/egypt02.htm   (1429 words)

  
 Thelemapedia: The Encyclopedia of Thelema & Magick | Egyptian mythology
Egyptian mythology (or Egyptian religion) is the name for the succession of beliefs held by the people of Egypt until the coming of Christianity and Islam.
Beliefs about the soul meant that embalming and mummification were practiced, in order to preserve the individual's identity in the afterlife.
In later belief, the soul of the deceased is led into a hall of judgment in Duat, by Anubis, and the deceased's heart, which was the record of the morality of the owner, is weighed against a single feather representing Maàt's (the concept of truth, and order).
www.thelemapedia.org /index.php/Egyptian_mythology   (2030 words)

  
 Mummy: The Resurrection   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The body is soaked in natron (a salt mixture common to the Egyptian embalming process) and wrapped in protective bandages that have been inscribed with spells.
The fragment of an ancient Egyptian soul replaces the flawed or impure portion of the modern soul, and it is called a tem-akh, or "completing spirit." The new soul joins seamlessly with old; the newly empowered soul merges once more with the body.
The resurrected individual - referred to formally as an Amenti in honor of the lost city of the dead - may undergo changes as the body adjusts to its new, more powerful life force, although these alterations tend to be subtle ones.
www.white-wolf.com /Games/Pages/MummyPreview/SpellOfLife.html   (183 words)

  
 Soul — Infoplease.com
The Moslems say that the souls of the faithful assume the forms of snow-white birds, and nestle under the throne of Allah until the resurrection.
Soul, in Egyptian hieroglyphics, is represented by several emblems, as a basket of fire, a heron, a hawk with a human face, and a ram.
soul: The Soul in Christianity - The Soul in Christianity In Christianity the soul is all important.
www.infoplease.com /dictionary/brewers/soul.html   (233 words)

  
 Egyptian Art
For the Egyptians believed that the body must be preserved if the soul is to live on in the beyond.
The Egyptians held the belief that the preservation of the body was not enough.
The pictures and models found in Egyptian tombs were connected with the idea of providing the soul with helpmates in the other world, a belief that is found in many early cultures.
www.artchive.com /artchive/E/egyptian.html   (1510 words)

  
 Myth and Legend ch. 7
The divergent conceptions regarding the soul in Egyptian religion arose from the mingling of beliefs caused by the mingling of peoples, and also the Egyptian tendency to cling to every belief, or form of belief, which evolved in the course of time in Egypt.
The sun worshippers believed that the souls of the dead passed to the first division of night, where those who were privileged to utter the magical spells, which could compel the obedience of the gods, were permitted to enter the bark of Ra.
The souls of dead men whom Osiris condemns, because of sins committed upon earth, are subjected to terrible tortures ere they are devoured by the animal gods which crouch, waiting, in the silent and awful Hall of Judgment.
www.earth-history.com /Egypt/Myth/eml07.htm   (4318 words)

  
 Article Egypt
The ancient Egyptians have given us clues, through writing, art, and symbols, of their belief in bodies that are separate and independent.
I submit that the high priests of the Egyptian Mysteries were adepts in moving through various levels of consciousness, also referred to as bodies, and that initiates (88) went through different stages of growth in learning and experiencing alternate realities.
In Egyptian reliefs and paintings, the ka is shown standing protectively behind the pharaoh, acting as a sort of guardian angel in life.
www.janetcunningham.com /article_egypt.html   (4377 words)

  
 Egypt: Tour Egypt Monthly: Ancient Egypt Concept of Soul
An interesting point to note is that the Egyptians believed that animals, plants, water and even stones had their own Ka.
The Egyptians mummified their bodies because their physical form was an integral part to their afterlife.
But death, to the Egyptians, was a somewhat better version of their current life.
www.touregypt.net /magazine/mag05012001/magf3.htm   (1146 words)

  
 WELCOME TO EGYPTIAN MAGIC®
We at Egyptian Magic are honored and grateful to be of service to you.
Egyptian Magic is a skin care cream with legendary healing powers due to its unique blend of all natural ingredients derived only from living plants and organisms.
Egyptian Magic has been on the market for 25 years and has grown through word of mouth into one of the most popular and widely endorsed skin creams in the world.
www.egyptianmagic.com   (162 words)

  
 Glossary
Iter is the Egyptian for "river." Hapy was the personification of the Nile's bounty and the fertility of the river's annual inundation.
She is source of the child’s identity and training, thus she is goddess of art and music and theater, all the entertainments of the soul which also guide and shape it.
SOUL DOOR—A pair of Watch It Eyes painted on the wall of the birthing chamber and the door of the tomb, marking a place where the two realities merge and a soul can cross from one reality to another, both to visit the living and to hear their messages.
hometown.aol.com /tokapu/glossary.htm   (2615 words)

  
 'KA', AND EGYPTIAN MAGIC
There is a second kind of soul in Egyptian, the ba, or heart soul, and a third, the khu, or spirit soul, which is also the sign for radiance.
Egyptian thehen, lightning, and Greek thuo, sacrifice with fire, are near enough to suggest that sacrificial fire is the door to Re, or perhaps Re's fire is the doorway to immortality.
Osiris Auf-ankh prays to the soul lying prostrate in the body, "whose flame comes into being from out of the fire which blazes within the sea (or water) in such wise that the sea (water) is raised up on high out of the fire thereof...".
www.quantavolution.org /vol_12/ka_13.htm   (4881 words)

  
 Mnemonic Device of the Joseph Smith Papyri, Egyptian Alphabet & Grammar & the Book of Abraham
Our work has emphasized the meanings of the Egyptian words and their relationship to the Book of Abraham text; also, we have supplemented this with a secondary consideration of the relationship of homophonous (similar-sounding) Hebrew words to the relevant passages when this has seemed appropriate.
By combining the Egyptian "s'it" with "n", we approximate the Hebrew "tsa'an", meaning "wander, migrate, remove." By "remove" is meant, specifically, the removal of a nomad's tent from one place to another.
The Egyptian symbol is the mouth, and may have been used in reference to speech by whoever allied the Abrahamic text with the Sen-Sen text.
www.docbible.com /Egyptian_alphabet.htm   (7072 words)

  
 John Van Auken | Soul Life - A Light Heart - Egyptian Key
One of many wonderful scenes in ancient Egyptian art is “The Judgment,” sometimes called “The Weighing of the Heart.”; It appears in the papyrus scrolls of The Egyptian Book of the Dead.
The Cayce readings tell the story of an Egyptian high priest named Ra Ta who, at a very old age and in decrepit condition, was able to rejuvenate himself and live another one hundred years, in order to work on the building of the great pyramid of Giza.
In the Egyptian scene, Ani’s heart is indeed lighter than Maat’s feather, and he is allowed to enter the higher heavens.
edgarcayce.org /ps2/soul_life_light_heart_egyptian_key.html   (919 words)

  
 Egyptian Art
For the Egyptians believed that the body must be preserved if the soul is to live on in the beyond.
The Egyptians held the belief that the preservation of the body was not enough.
The pictures and models found in Egyptian tombs were connected with the idea of providing the soul with helpmates in the other world, a belief that is found in many early cultures.
artchive.com /artchive/E/egyptian.html   (1503 words)

  
 Egyptian Goddesses Short Information
Ancient Egyptians had no conception of Hell or place of punishment; but after death there came the weighing of the soul in presence of Osiris and Toth wrote the good and evil doings of the soul into a book.
The cult died out in Rome after the institution of Christianity, and the last remaining Egyptian temples to Isis were closed in the middle of the 6th century AD.
Her feather of truth was weighed against the sins of the soul (see Ammut): In funerary scenes and pictures depicting the underworld, the figure of Ma'at or her feather was placed on the opposite side of the scale from the heart of the deceased.
inanna.virtualave.net /egyptianshort.html   (1774 words)

  
 Thelemapedia: The Encyclopedia of Thelema & Magick | Egyptian soul concept   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Egyptians believed that the human soul was made up of five main parts: the ka, ba, akh, name and shadow.
The ka was a person's double, an exact copy of their entire soul that stayed with them while the person lived.
The akh was formed by the joining of the ka and ba in the afterlife after the weighing of the soul against Ma'at's feather.
www.thelemapedia.org /index.php/Egyptian_soul   (479 words)

  
 Egyptian soul - Education - Information - Educational Resources - Encyclopedia - Music
In Egyptian mythology, the human soul is made up of five parts: the Ka, the Ba, the Akh, the Name and the Shadow.
Ka The Ka was the spiritual soul of a person or a god, a type of mana.
The Ka was created by Mesenet along with the physical form of the person, and then continued to the underworld after the death of the physical body.
www.music.us /education/E/Egyptian-soul.htm   (484 words)

  
 Egyptian Consciousness.
When we consider the idea of the soul at all in connection with consciousness, we generally adopt a kind of neo-Cartesian conception of it: a simplified Christian view of the kind which was accurately, if insultingly, summed up by Gilbert Ryle with the phrase 'the ghost in the machine'.
This does not by any means exhaust the Egyptian vocabulary of personhood, but I think it is enough to be going on with; I am already in danger of trying to bring together systematically views which may not actually have been part of a fully coherent system.
A twenty-first century person, after all, might well believe simultaneously in the Christian soul, ghosts, the Freudian subconscious, and the multiple personalities of DID, without ever bothering to work out exactly how the different conceptions fitted together, and the chances are the Egyptians were similarly unworried by the odd complexity of their views.
www.consciousentities.com /baandka.htm   (1730 words)

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