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Topic: Elapidae


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In the News (Wed 24 Apr 19)

  
  eMedicine - Snakebite : Article Excerpt by: Brian James Daley, MD, MBA, FACS
The family Elapidae is the next largest family of venomous snakes.
In North America the venomous species are members of the families elapidae, and viperidae, subfamily crotalidae.
Cobras, mambas, and kraits also are also members of the family elapidae but are not indigenous to the Americas.
www.emedicine.com /med/byname/snakebite.htm   (560 words)

  
 Elapidae
"Elapidae" is a common misspelling or typo for: Elapid, Elucidate, Lapidate.
English words defined with "Elapidae": Elapine ♦ family Elapidae.
"Elapidae" is used about 2 times out of a sample of 100 million words spoken or written in English.
www.websters-online-dictionary.org /definition/english/El/Elapidae.html   (0 words)

  
 SurvivalIQ Handbook: Survival Skills - Elapidae description, habitat and picture - Poisonous snakes and lizards
A group of highly dangerous snakes with powerful neurotoxic venom that affects the nervous system, causing respiratory paralysis.
Poking around in holes and rock piles is dangerous because of the chance of encountering a spitting cobra.
A subfamily of elapidae, these snakes are specialized in that they found a better environment in the oceans.
www.survivaliq.com /survival/poisonous-snakes-and-lizards-elapidae.htm   (0 words)

  
  Family: Elapidae - Elapid - Identification of Cobras, Kraits, and Coral Snakes
Family: Elapidae - Elapid - Identification of Cobras, Kraits, and Coral Snakes
Family: Elapidae - Identification of Cobras, Kraits, and Coral Snakes
A group of highly dangerous snakes with powerful neurotoxic venom that affects the nervous system, causing respiratory paralysis.
www.tigerhomes.org /animal/elapidae-family.cfm   (372 words)

  
  Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for mamba
Elapidae (cobras, kraits, taipans, mambas, coral snakes; order Squamata, suborder Serpentes) A family of venomous snakes which have short, firm, grooved fangs at the front of the mouth.
The fangs are hollow and short, as in cobras, mambas, and coral snakes (Elapidae).
There are three types of venomous snake: the Viperidae, subdivided into true vipers and pit vipers, whose venom causes internal haemorrhage; the Elapidae (including cobras, mambas, kraits), whose venom...
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=mamba   (525 words)

  
 Definition of elapidae - Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
Learn more about "elapidae " and related topics at Britannica.com
Find more about "elapidae " instantly with Live Search
See a map of "elapidae " in the Visual Thesaurus
www.m-w.com /dictionary/elapidae   (0 words)

  
 Herp net - Reptile papers on this site - ordered by date - downloadable in full.
An overview of the Taipans, Genus: (Oxyuranus) (Serpentes: Elapidae) including the description of a new subspecies.
Genetic composition of Death Adders (Acanthophis antarcticus) Serpentes: Elapidae, in the West Head Area (Australia).
Mating behaviour of Australian Death Adders: Genus Acanthophis (Serpentes: Elapidae).
www.smuggled.com /pap1.htm   (1789 words)

  
 Herpbreeder.dk
A new cobra (Elapidae: Naja) from Myanmar (Burma).
Wüster, W. The status of the cobras of the genus Naja Laurenti, 1768 (Reptilia: Serpentes: Elapidae) on the island of Sulawesi.
Population systematics of the snake genus Naja (Reptilia: Serpentes: Elapidae) in Indochina: multivariate morphometrics and comparative mitochondrial DNA sequencing (cytochrome oxidase I).
www.herpbreeder.com /pdf/pdfserpentes.htm   (1793 words)

  
 chinesecobra
Cobras are venomous snakes of family Elapidae, of several genera.
(Elapidae also include the taipans, brown snakes, tiger snakes, fierce snakes, coral snakes, mambas, and sea snakes.) Cobras generally inhabit tropical and desert regions of Asia and Africa.
Elapidae cannot fold their fangs down, as Viperidae can, so the fangs are generally shorter.
www.geocities.com /wendy19871010/chinesecobra.html?1166002435984   (749 words)

  
 details
Cloning of cDNAs encoding C-type lectins from Elapidae snakes Bungarus fasciatus and Bungarus multicinctus.
In contrast, only a few reports could be found in literature concerning the C-type lectins in Elapidae snake venoms.
Based on the published cDNA sequences of C-type lectins from Viperidae snake venoms, oligonucleotide primers were designed and used to screen the cDNA libraries made from the venom glands of Bungarus fasciatus and Bungarus multicinctus.
cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn /ChinaPaper/details.asp?PubMedID=11600152   (220 words)

  
 Amazon.com: elapidae   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Burrowing with a kinetic snout in a snake (Elapidae: Aspidelaps scutatus).(Collegiate Communications--Undergraduate) : An article from: Proceedings of the North Dakota Academy of Science by Alexandra Deufel and Shawn D. Bruce (April 11, 2006)
The genus Pseudonaja (Serpentes: elapidae) in the Northern Territory (Research bulletin / Territory Parks and Wildlife Commission) by M. W Gillam (Unknown Binding - 1979)
The genera of sea-snakes of the Hydrophis group (Serpentes: Elapidae) (Transactions of the Zoological Society of London) by Samuel Booker McDowell (Unknown Binding - 1972)
www.amazon.com /s?ie=UTF8&keywords=elapidae&index=blended&page=1   (753 words)

  
 Elapidae   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Fangs are permanently erect on the anterior ends of largely immovable maxillae and fit into grooved slots in the buccal floor when the mouth is closed (termed the proteroglyphous condition; McCarthy, 1985).
Slowinski, Joseph B.; Boundy, Jeff and Lawson,R. The phylogenetic relationships of Asian coral snakes (Elapidae: Calliophis and Maticora) based on morphological and molecular characters.
Inferring species trees from gene trees: A phylogenetic analysis of the Elapidae (Serpentes) based on the amino acid sequences of venom proteins.
www.embl-heidelberg.de /~uetz/families/Elapidae.html   (1167 words)

  
 Cobra at AllExperts
Cobras are venomous snakes of family Elapidae, of several genera.
(Elapidae also include the taipans, brown snakes, tiger snakes, fierce snakes, coral snakes, mambas, and sea snakes.) Cobras generally inhabit tropical and desert regions of Asia and Africa.
Elapidae cannot fold their fangs down, as Viperidae can, so the fangs are generally shorter.
en.allexperts.com /e/c/co/cobra.htm   (492 words)

  
 Elapidae2005
The entire group is referred to as the Acanthophis rugosus complex, with the possibility that the Barkly + floodplain populations may represent a valid species, for which the name Acanthophis hawkei is available.
W├╝ster, W., A.J. Dumbrell, C. Hay, C.E. Pook, D.J. Williams and B.G. Fry (2005) Snakes across the Strait: Trans-Torresian phylogeographic relationships in three genera of Australasian snakes (Serpentes: Elapidae: Acanthophis, Oxyuranus and Pseudechis).
Passos, P. and D.S. Fernandes (2005) Variation and taxonomic status of the aquatic coral snake Micrurus surinamensis (Cuvier, 1817) (Serpentes: Elapidae).
biology.bangor.ac.uk /~bss166/Updates/Elapidae2005.htm   (1159 words)

  
 Olympus MIC-D: Brightfield Gallery - Snake Cross-Section
Of the roughly 2,100 species of snakes worldwide, only 200 species carry the potential for human suffering and death in their venom.
In North America, 137 snake species are represented by seven families including the notorious Viperidae (vipers and pit vipers) and highly venomous Elapidae (coral snakes).
While most of the rattlesnakes (genus Crotalus and Sistrurus) are elusive and nocturnal, generally avoiding human contact, other relatively harmless and beneficial snakes such as the bull snake or gopher snake (Pituophis catenifer) often find themselves facing the sharp end of a shovel.
www.olympusmicro.com /micd/galleries/brightfield/snakecrosssection.html   (429 words)

  
 Reptiles: Elapids
Notes on reproduction in the Central American coral snake, Micrurus nigrocinctus (Serpentes: Elapidae) from Costa Rica.
Venomous snakes in cold climates: ecology of the Australian genus Drysdalia (Serpentes: Elapidae).
Snakes across the Strait: trans-Torresian phylogeographic relationships in three genera of Australasian snakes (Serpentes: Elapidae: Acanthophis, Oxyuranus, and Pseudechis).
www.herper.com /snakes/elapids.html   (131 words)

  
 elapidae - OneLook Dictionary Search
elapidae : WordNet 1.7 Vocabulary Helper [home, info]
Elapidae : Stedman's Online Medical Dictionary, 27th Edition [home, info]
Elapidae : Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary [home, info]
www.onelook.com /?w=elapidae   (113 words)

  
 Wilderness Drum > Wilderness Writings > Emergency Care > Snakebite > Elapidae
The other great family of snakes in the United States are the Elapidae or coral snakes.
There is no antivenom available for the western coral snake, and care for victims of this snake is entirely supportive.
There are other antivenoms produced in other countries, such as Costa Rica, Brazil, and India, for Elapidae species found there.
www.wildernessdrum.com /html/snakebite02.html   (840 words)

  
 Elapidae (Cobras, Coral Snakes, Sea Snakes)
Members of the Elapidae family, called elapids, are among some of the most feared snakes in the world.
However, the Elapidae family also includes sea snakes, which are relatively harmless.
Although elapids are found throughout the world, they are most common in the Southern Hemisphere.
www.thebigzoo.com /zoo/Elapidae.asp   (69 words)

  
 King Cobra Printout- EnchantedLearning.com
Reproduction: Female King Cobras build a leafy nest early in spring; they lay up to 20 to 50 white, leathery eggs, which have an incubation period of 60 to 70 days.
Classification: Class Reptilia (reptiles), Order Squamata (lizards and snakes), Suborder Serpentes, Family Elapidae, Genus Ophiophagus, Species hannah.
First search engine with spelling correction and pictures!
www.enchantedlearning.com /subjects/reptiles/snakes/Kingcobra.shtml   (0 words)

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