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Topic: Electrocardiogram


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ECG

In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  The Electrocardiogram - looking at the heart of electricity
The Electrocardiogram or ECG (sometimes called EKG) is today used worldwide as a relatively simple way of diagnosing heart conditions.
An Electrocardiogram is a recording of the small electric waves being generated during heart activity.
The electric currents in the heart have been measured for more than a hundred years, but the fundamental function of the ECG as we know it today was developed by the Dutch scientist Willem Einthoven in the beginning of the 20th century.
nobelprize.org /educational_games/medicine/ecg/ecg-readmore.html   (961 words)

  
 Electrocardiogram
During an electrocardiogram, the electrodes are attached to the skin on the chest, arms, and legs.
An electrocardiogram may be used to evaluate symptoms of heart disease (such as unexplained chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, faintness, or palpitations) or when risk factors for heart disease (such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, cigarette smoking, diabetes, or a family history of early heart disease) are present.
An electrocardiogram (EKG, ECG) is usually done by a health professional, and the resulting EKG is interpreted by a doctor, such as an internist, family medicine doctor, electrophysiologist, cardiologist, anesthesiologist, or surgeon.
www.webmd.com /hw/heart_disease/hw213248.asp   (2013 words)

  
 Electrocardiogram - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Lead II An electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG, abbreviated from the German Elektrokardiogramm) is a graphic produced by an electrocardiograph, which records the electrical voltage in the heart in the form of a continuous strip graph.
The electrocardiogram does not assess the contractility of the heart.
The baseline voltage of the electrocardiogram is known as the isoelectric line.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Electrocardiogram   (1746 words)

  
 PetPlace.com - Article: Electrocardiogram in Dogs   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
An electrocardiogram (EKG) is a diagnostic test that records the electrical activity of the heart.
The Holter electrocardiogram is an ambulatory EKG that is tape-recorded for later playback.
An electrocardiogram is used to reveal abnormalities of heart rate and electrical rhythm (arrhythmias).
www.petplace.com /articles/artPrinterFriendly.asp?conID=21519   (785 words)

  
 Exercise Electrocardiogram
An exercise electrocardiogram (sometimes called a stress or treadmill test) is done during exercise to evaluate how the heart responds to the demands of physical activity.
During an electrocardiogram, the electrodes are attached to the skin on your chest, arms, and legs.
A resting electrocardiogram (EKG, ECG) is always done before an exercise electrocardiogram because certain types of abnormalities in the electrical activity of the heart may make an exercise EKG more difficult to interpret.
www.webmd.com /hw/heart_disease/hw234760.asp   (2082 words)

  
 Electrocardiogram: Tracing the electrical path through the heart - MayoClinic.com
An electrocardiogram is a simple test that provides valuable clues about your heart health.
An electrocardiogram is a painless, noninvasive way to diagnose many common types of heart disease.
Your doctor may use an ECG to detect irregularities in your heart rhythm, structural abnormalities in your heart, or problems with the supply of blood and oxygen to your heart.
www.mayoclinic.com /health/electrocardiogram/HB00014   (906 words)

  
 Electrocardiogram - Texas Heart Institute Heart Information Center
An electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) is a routine test that is used to look at the electrical activity of the heartbeat.
An electrocardiogram can tell your doctor a lot about your heart and how it is working.
An electrocardiogram can trace the path of electrical energy that is sent from the SA node and through your heart.
texasheart.org /HIC/Topics/Diag/diekg.cfm   (440 words)

  
 Cardiovascular Tests and Procedures - Electrocardiogram : MCG Health System
An electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) is one of the simplest and fastest procedures used to evaluate the heart.
When the electrodes are connected to an ECG machine by lead wires, the electrical activity of the heart is measured, interpreted, and printed out for the physician's information and further interpretation.
Other related procedures that may be used to assess the heart include exercise electrocardiogram (ECG), Holter monitor, signal-averaged ECG, cardiac catheterization, chest x-ray, computed tomography (CT scan) of the chest, echocardiography, electrophysiological studies, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the heart, myocardial perfusion scans, radionuclide angiography, and ultrafast CT scan.
www.mcghealth.org /Greystone/t_and_p/heart/TP131.html   (1458 words)

  
 Electrocardiogram (EKG)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
An electrocardiogram (often called an EKG) is a recording of the electrical activity within the heart obtained from the placement of various electrodes on the skin surface.
An electrocardiogram is performed to evaluate the heart rate and rhythm.
An electrocardiogram can be performed in a doctor's office, cardiology suite or at the hospital bedside.
www.healthatoz.com /healthatoz/Atoz/dc/tp/electro.jsp   (344 words)

  
 Electrocardiogram definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of popular medical terms
Electrocardiogram: A recording of the electrical activity of the heart.
Electrodes are placed on the skin of the chest and connected in a specific order to a machine that, when turned on, measures electrical activity all overaround the heart.
Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) - Read about the Electrocardiogram (ECG, EKG) procedure to test the electrical activity of the heart.
www.medterms.com /script/main/art.asp?articlekey=3212   (301 words)

  
 Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) - Diagnostic Tests - CardiologyChannel
An electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) is a noninvasive test used to measure electrical activity in the heart.
The ECG can also suggest recent or past heart attack, inflammation of the pericardium, or a blood clot that has traveled to the lungs.
Electrocardiogram may be used in the diagnosis of atrial fibrillation, congestive heart failure, and heart attack.
www.cardiologychannel.com /diagnostics/EKG.shtml   (164 words)

  
 Electrocardiogram : What to Expect Before, Complications & Risks, What to Expect During, What to Expect After, FAQs, ...
In this test, the heart’s electrical activity is recorded through electrodes placed on your skin.
Electrocardiograms (ECGs or EKGs) give your doctor a picture (tracing) of your heart’s electrical activity.
The AF Suppression algorithm is combined with the most advanced diagnostic systems and bradycardia features available, establishing the Identity ADx as a premier product in advanced arrhythmia care.
www.sjm.com /procedures/procedure.aspx?name=Electrocardiogram   (180 words)

  
 ECG (electrocardiogram)
ECG (electrocardiogram) is a test that measures the electrical activity of the heart.
The heart is a muscular organ that beats in rhythm to pump the blood through the body.
This is known as an electrocardiogram, and records any problems with the heart's rhythm, and the conduction of the heart beat through the heart which may be affected by underlying heart disease.
www.netdoctor.co.uk /health_advice/examinations/ecg.htm   (721 words)

  
 Electrocardiogram (ECG, EKG) Procedure and Results Information by MedicineNet.com
The electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) is a noninvasive test that is used to reflect underlying heart conditions by measuring the electrical activity of the heart.
By positioning leads (electrical sensing devices) on the body in standardized locations, information about many heart conditions can be learned by looking for characteristic patterns on the ECG.
Read 27 more Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) related articles...
www.medicinenet.com /electrocardiogram_ecg_or_ekg/article.htm   (490 words)

  
 Electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG) (Cardiology Tests and Procedures)
Electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG) (Cardiology Tests and Procedures)
An Electrocardiogram is a noninvasive test that records the electrical activity of the heart.
The electrical activity is related to the impulses that travel through the heart that determine the heart's rate and rhythm.
www.torrancememorial.org /carekg.htm   (219 words)

  
 Electrocardiogram (EKG) / Stress Test / Holter Monitor
Electrocardiogram (ECG) / Stress Test / Holter Monitor
An electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG), is a measurement of the electrical activity of the heart.
By placing electrodes at specific locations on the body (chest, arms, and legs), a graphic representation, or tracing, of the electrical activity can be obtained.
www.healthsystem.virginia.edu /uvahealth/adult_cardiac/electro.cfm   (1539 words)

  
 AllRefer Health - ECG: Pictures & Images (EKG, Electrocardiogram)
The electrocardiogram (ECG, EKG) is used extensively in the diagnosis of heart disease, from congenital heart disease in infants to myocardial infarction and myocarditis in adults.
This picture shows an ECG (electrocardiogram, EKG) of a person with an abnormal rhythm (arrhythmia) called an atrioventricular (AV) block.
Routine lab tests are recommended before beginning treatment of high blood pressure to determine organ or tissue damage or other risk factors.
health.allrefer.com /health/ecg-pictures-images.html   (426 words)

  
 Frankford Hospitals - Signal-Averaged Electrocardiogram
During this procedure, multiple ECG tracings are obtained over a period of approximately 20 minutes in order to capture abnormal heartbeats which may occur only intermittently.
Signal-averaged ECG is one of several procedures used to assess the potential for dysrhythmias/arrhythmias (irregular heart rhythms) in certain medical situations.
Other related procedures that may be used to assess the heart include resting electrocardiogram (ECG), Holter monitor, exercise electrocardiogram (ECG), cardiac catheterization, chest x-ray, computed tomography (CT scan) of the chest, echocardiography, electrophysiological studies, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the heart, myocardial perfusion scans, radionuclide angiography, and ultrafast CT scan.
www.frankfordhospitals.org /healthinfo/t_and_p/heart/TP145.html   (1218 words)

  
 What Is an Electrocardiogram?
DCI Home: Heart and Vascular Diseases: Electrocardiogram: What Is...
An electrocardiogram, also called an EKG or ECG, is a simple test that detects and records the electrical activity of the heart.
It is used to detect and locate the source of heart problems.
www.nhlbi.nih.gov /health/dci/Diseases/ekg/ekg_what.html   (360 words)

  
 Electrocardiogram (EKG) - My Child Has - Children's Hospital Boston
Electrocardiogram (EKG) - My Child Has - Children's Hospital Boston
When the electrodes are connected to the EKG/ECG machine by lead wires, the electrical activity of your child's heart is measured, interpreted, and printed out for the physician's information and further interpretation.
The electrical activity of the heart is measured by an electrocardiogram.
www.childrenshospital.org /az/Site494/mainpageS494P0.html   (1552 words)

  
 Resting Electrocardiogram (EKG)
The electrocardiogram is a recording of the electrical activity of the heart as it undergoes excitation (depolarization) and recovery (polarization) to initiate each beat of the heart.
In leads facing the left ventricle, the deflection is positive and its is inversely related to body temperature.
Brugada syndrome, a primary electrical disease of the heart, is characterized by a pattern of RBBB and ST-segment elevation in electrocardiogram (ECG) leads V1-V3 (Figures 94-32, 94-33) and caused by a defect in ion channel genes, resulting in abnormal electropysiological activity in the right ventricle and propensity to malignant tachyarrhythmias.
www.rjmatthewsmd.com /Definitions/electrocardiogram.htm   (8327 words)

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