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Topic: Electromagnetism


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In the News (Fri 24 Nov 17)

  
  Electromagnetism
Thus, an electromagnet consists of a long coil of insulated copper wire wound on a soft iron core.
Electromagnets can be made of different shapes and sizes depending on the purpose for which they are to be used.
In general, an electromagnet is often considered better than a permanent magnet because it can produce very strong magnetic fields and its strength can be controlled by varying the number of turns in its coil or by changing the current flowing through the coil.
www.howmagnetswork.com /Electromagnetism.html   (913 words)

  
 electromagnetism
Click here to find out more about Electromagnetic Inertia.
All we need to consider is what happens when a magnet is lined up along the spin axis of a precessing gyroscope.
If you think about it you will see that the magnetic field is rotating with the precession, and rotating magnetic fields radiate electromagnetic energy.
www.mariner.connectfree.co.uk /html/electromagnetism.html   (358 words)

  
  Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Electromagnetism
Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field; a field encompassing all of space which exerts a force on particles that possess the property of electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of those particles.
An accurate theory of electromagnetism, known as classical electromagnetism, was developed by various physicists over the course of the 19th century, culminating in the work of James Clerk Maxwell, who unified the preceding developments into a single theory and discovered the electromagnetic nature of light.
In classical electromagnetism, the electromagnetic field obeys a set of equations known as Maxwell's equations, and the electromagnetic force is given by the Lorentz force law.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Electromagnetic_interaction   (1163 words)

  
  Electromagnetism - LoveToKnow 1911
He then found that such an electromagnet wound with a long fine wire, if worked with a battery consisting of a large number of cells in series, could be operated at a considerable distance, and he thus produced what were called at that time intensity electromagnets, and which subsequently rendered the electric telegraph a possibility.
The phenomena presented by the electromagnet are interpreted by the aid of the notion of the magnetic circuit.
Various forms of electromagnets used in connexion with dynamo machines are considered in the article Dynamo, and there is, therefore, no necessity to refer particularly to the numerous different shapes and types employed in electrotechnics.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Electromagnetism   (5003 words)

  
  Electromagnetism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field; a field encompassing all of space which exerts a force on particles that possess the property of electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of those particles.
An accurate theory of electromagnetism, known as classical electromagnetism, was developed by various physicists over the course of the 19th century, culminating in the work of James Clerk Maxwell, who unified the preceding developments into a single theory and discovered the electromagnetic nature of light.
In classical electromagnetism, the electromagnetic field obeys a set of equations known as Maxwell's equations, and the electromagnetic force is given by the Lorentz force law.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Electromagnetism   (1179 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Electromagnetism is a theory unified by James Clerk Maxwell to explain the interrelationship between electricity and magnetism.
In the field of particle physics this electromagnetic radiation is the manifestation of the electromagnetic interaction between charged particles.
The whole of electromagnetism is governed by Maxwell's equations, which are compatible with and served as a motivation for the theory of relativity.
wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/e/el/electromagnetism.html   (795 words)

  
 Electromagnetism - School for Champions: Succeed in Physical Science
An electromagnet is an object that acts like a magnet, but its magnetic force is created and controlled by electricity--thus the name electromagnet.
If AC electricity is used, the electromagnet has the same properties of a magnet, except that the polarity reverses with the AC cycle.
The strength of the electromagnetic field is determined by the amount of current, number of coils of wire, and the distance from the wire.
www.school-for-champions.com /science/electromagnetism.htm   (1348 words)

  
 Electromagnetism
Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field, including its effect on electrically charged particles.
The theory of classical electromagnetism was developed by various physicists over the course of the 19th century, culminating in the work of James Clerk Maxwell, who unified the preceding developments into a single theory and discovered the electromagnetic nature of light.
Electrodynamics is a (somewhat poorly-defined) subfield of electromagnetism that deals with rapidly changing electric and magnetic fields, and their effects on the motion of charged particles.
www.guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/e/el/electromagnetism.html   (326 words)

  
 Electromagnetism
It is also a branch of physics that is focused on the study of the electromagnetic field produced by the combination of the magnetic field and the electric field that encompass all of space.
That force is referred to as the electromagnetic force and is one of the fundamental forces that affect the universe, the other ones being strong nuclear force, weak nuclear force and gravitational force.
Electromagnetism can be traced back to the 17th century, when it was first understood that magnetism and electricity were distinct concepts.
www.iscid.org /encyclopedia/Electromagnetism   (217 words)

  
 Electromagnetism - tScholars.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field, encompassing all of space, which exerts a force on those particles that possess the property of electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of such particles.
The term "electromagnetism" comes from the fact that the electric and magnetic fields generally cannot be described independently of one another.
A changing magnetic field produces an electric field (this is the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction, which underlies the operation of electrical generators, induction motors, and transformers).
www.tscholars.com /encyclopedia/Electromagnetism   (1264 words)

  
 Electromagnetism for Ghost Hunters
The term "electromagnetic radiation" is based on the characteristic electric and magnetic properties common to all forms of this wave-like energy, as manifested by the generation of both electrical and magnetic oscillating fields.
An electromagnetic wave moves or propagates in a direction that is at right angles to the vibrations of both the electric and magnetic oscillating field vectors, carrying energy from its radiation source to an undetermined final destination.
The standard unit of measure for all electromagnetic radiation is the magnitude of the wavelength (in a vacuum), which is usually reported in terms of nanometers for the visible light portion of the spectrum.
www.sgha.net /articles/ghosthunter_emf.html   (2245 words)

  
 PowerPedia:Electromagnetism - PESWiki
Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field; a field encompassing all of space which exerts a force on particles that possess the property of electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of those particles.
An accurate theory of electromagnetism, known as classical electromagnetism, was developed by various physicists over the course of the 19th century, culminating in the work of James Clerk Maxwell, who unified the preceding developments into a single theory and discovered the electromagnetic nature of light.
In classical electromagnetism, the electromagnetic field obeys a set of equations known as Maxwell's equations, and the electromagnetic force is given by the Lorentz force law.
www.peswiki.com /index.php/Electromagnetism   (1099 words)

  
 Electromagnetism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In 1865 * James Clerk Maxwell unified the theories describing the forces of electricity and magnetism into one theory of electromagnetism.
Maxwell’s equations predicted that the speed of light should be a constant.
Electromagnetic waves of wavelength > 1m are called radio waves.
www.321books.co.uk /encyclopedia/physics/electromagnetism.htm   (209 words)

  
 Electromagnetism - KnowallWiki
Electromagnetism works on the principle that an electric current through a wire generates a magnetic field.
Bear in mind that electromagnetic waves propagate by a falling magnetic field creating a rising electric field, and vice-versa, while moving electrostatic fields simply generate magnetic fields in situ.
A electric dipole generates electrostatic and electromagnetic fields; near the dipole the electrostatic fields dominate, but the field falls off at 1/r3 while the electromagnetic fields fall off only as 1/r2, so more then a wavelength or more away from the aerial the electromagnetic waves dominate.
www.darkgovernment.com /wiki/index.php/Electromagnetism   (1383 words)

  
 Sketching the History of Classical Electromagnetism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The partial-drag theory of George Gabriel Stokes (1819-1903) is revived for the explanation of stellar aberration.
Oliver Heaviside (1850-1925) writes Electromagnetic induction and its propagation over the course of two years, re-expressing Maxwell's results in 3 (complex) vector form, giving it much of its modern form and collecting together the basic set of equations from which electromagnetic theory may be derived (often called "Maxwell's equations").
Heaviside's "On the electromagnetic effects due to the motion of electrification through a dielectric," proposes part of inertial mass to be electromagnetic in origin and includes dependencies on higher-order terms in (v/c).
history.hyperjeff.net /electromagnetism.html   (3147 words)

  
 Electromagnetism
Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field; a field encompassing all of space which exerts a force on particle that possess the property of electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of those particles.
A changing magnetic field produces an electric field (this is the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction, which provides for the operation of electrical generators, induction motors, and transformers).
Different frequencies of oscillation give rise to the different forms of electromagnetic radiation, from radio waves at the lowest frequencies, to visible light at intermediate frequencies, to gamma rays at the highest frequencies.
www.buzznet.com /tags/electromagnetism   (279 words)

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