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Topic: Electromagnetic spectroscopy


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  Electromagnetic spectroscopy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Electromagnetic spectroscopy involves the use of a spectrophotometer.
Emission spectroscopy is the study of electromagnetic radiation spectra given off by atoms or molecules that undergo a transition to a lower energy level.
Mossbauer spectroscopy - Measures the absorption of gamma rays by atoms bound in a solid as a function of gamma-ray energy.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Electromagnetic_spectroscopy   (852 words)

  
 Spectroscopy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Spectroscopy is the study of spectra, that is, the dependence of physical quantities on frequency.
Spectroscopy is often used in physical and analytical chemistry for the identification of substances, through the spectrum emitted or absorbed.
The intensity of emitted electromagnetic radiation and the amount of absorbed electromagnetic radiation are studied by electromagnetic spectroscopy.
www.bexley.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Spectroscopy   (1521 words)

  
 Spectroscopy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The intensity of emitted electromagnetic radiation and the amount of absorbed electromagnetic radiation are studied by electromagnetic spectroscopy (see also cross section).
The amplitude of macroscopic vibrations is studied by acoustic spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical spectroscopy.
Scattering spectroscopy measures certain physical properties by measuring the amount of light that a substance scatters at cetain wavelengths, incident angles, and polarization angles.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Spectroscopy   (1620 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Electromagnetic spectroscopy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Fluorescence spectroscopy or fluorometry is a type of electromagnetic spectroscopy used for analyzing fluorescent spectra.
Atomic absorption spectroscopy in analytical chemistry is a technique for determining the concentration of a particular metal element within a sample.
Stark spectroscopy or electroabsorption spectroscopy is a form of UV/Vis spectroscopy, where the sample is exposed to a strong electrical field.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Electromagnetic-spectroscopy   (1842 words)

  
 ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM FACTS AND INFORMATION
Also, the "electromagnetic spectrum" (usually just ''spectrum'') of an object is the range of electromagnetic radiation that it emits, reflects, or transmits.
The electromagnetic spectrum, shown in the table, extends from frequencies used in the electric power grid (at the long-wavelength end) to gamma radiation (at the short-wavelength end), covering wavelengths from thousands of kilometres down to fractions of the size of an atom.
Electromagnetic energy at a particular wavelength λ (in vacuum) has an associated frequency ν and photon energy ''E''.
www.witwik.com /electromagnetic_spectrum   (1413 words)

  
 Electromagnetic spectroscopy - Wikipedia
Electromagnetic spectra are spectrums which arise out of atoms absorbing and emitting quanta of electromagnetic radiation.
The energy level the atom goes in to is proportional to the frequency of the electromagnetic radiation it recieves.
The fl lines observed in the solar spectrum are where elements in the chronosphere of the sun have absorbed electromagnetic radiation which have the correct frequency to excite them to higher energy levels.
nostalgia.wikipedia.org /wiki/Electromagnetic_spectroscopy   (834 words)

  
 Electromagnetic spectroscopy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
spectrophotometry is the spectroscopy of electromagnetic spectra which arise out of atom s absorbing and emitting quanta of electromagnetic radiation.
X-ray s Electromagnetic spectroscopy can be classified into narrower fields as discussed below, though in some spectroscopic techniques, several processes may be happening at the same time.
Electromagnetic Compatibility Transactions Information about electromagnetic sources and their definitions, and articles about electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) standards and protection.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Electromagnetic_spectroscopy.html   (913 words)

  
 Electromagnetic spectroscopy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
spectrophotometry is the spectroscopy of electromagnetic spectra which arise out of atoms absorbingand emitting quanta of electromagneticradiation.
Emission spectroscopy is the study of electromagnetic radiation spectra given off by atoms or molecules that undergo atransition to a lower energy level.
Mossbauer spectroscopy - Measures the absorption ofgamma rays by atoms bound in a solid as a function of gamma-ray energy.
www.therfcc.org /electromagnetic-spectroscopy-38096.html   (630 words)

  
 Electromagnetic spectroscopy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Electromagnetic spectroscopy can be classified into narrower as discussed below though in some spectroscopic several processes may be happening at the time.
Emission spectroscopy is the study of electromagnetic spectra given off by atoms or molecules undergo a transition to a lower energy level.
Absorption spectroscopy is the study of electromagnetic spectra absorbed by atoms or molecules that energy levels.
www.freeglossary.com /Electromagnetic_spectroscopy   (683 words)

  
 SPECTROSCOPY FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Fluorescence spectroscopy uses higher energy photons to excite a sample, which will then emit lower energy photons.
Spectroscopy of matter in situations where the properties are changing with time is called Time-resolved_spectroscopy.
Spectroscopy using an AFM-based analytical technique is called Force_spectroscopy.
www.witwik.com /spectroscopy   (1520 words)

  
 ISAN - Department of Solid State Spectroscopy
The Raman and hyper-Raman spectroscopy of crystals, new carbon materials, porous semiconductors, superconducting and superionic crystals, the film structures, amorphous materials and liquids is the main goal of this Laboratory.
The spectroscopy of surface polaritons was used for optical constants determination of thin films and transition layers covering the dielectric crystals (metallic and “artificial dielectrics “ films [13], layers formed by the ion implantation of quartz surface).
It was shown that creating of the “doping” levels in the gap in the photonic crystal spectrum leads to the electromagnetic field concentration near the defect and, hence, to the enhancement of linear (absorption and Raman) and non-linear (second harmonic, sum- and difference-frequency generation) optical effects in such structures.
www.isan.troitsk.ru /eng/edssc.htm   (7561 words)

  
 Learn more about Spectroscopy in the online encyclopedia.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The recording and studying of spectrum of energy levels in atoms or molecules in the physical sciences is called spectroscopy.
electromagnetic spectroscopy - The study electomagnetic radiation spectra given off or absorbed by atoms or molecules changing energy levels.
Raman spectroscopy The study of spectra caused by the scattering and change in frequency of light due to the transition between vibrational/rotational energy levels in molecules.
www.onlineencyclopedia.org /s/sp/spectroscopy.html   (381 words)

  
 Spectroscopy - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
It is disputable whether this field strictly is a type of spectroscopy.
For example, UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy is most often performed on liquid samples to detect molecular content and IR spectroscopy is most often performed on dried samples to to determine molecular information, including structureal information.
NMR spectroscopy determines the different local environments of hydrogen or carbon atoms in an organic
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /spectroscopy.htm   (774 words)

  
 Basic features of electromagnetic radiation (from spectroscopy) --  Britannica Student Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Electromagnetic radiation is composed of oscillating electric and magnetic fields that have the ability to transfer energy through space.
The energy propagates as a wave, such that the crests and troughs of the wave move in vacuum at the speed of 299,792,458 metres per second.
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum adjacent to the short wavelength, or violet, end of the visible light range, is called ultraviolet radiation.
www.britannica.com /ebi/article-80587   (877 words)

  
 Electromagnetic spectrum Article, Electromagneticspectrum Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Electromagnetic energy at aparticular wavelength λ; (in vacuum) has an associated frequency ν and photon energy E.
The electromagnetic spectrum, shown in the table, extends from electric power at the long-wavelength end to gamma radiation atthe short-wavelength end, covering wavelengths from thousands of kilometres down to fractions of the size of an atom.
In the branch of physics called electromagnetic spectroscopy, the spectra ofradiation absorbed and emitted by matter is used to obtain information about matter.
www.anoca.org /frequency/rays/electromagnetic_spectrum.html   (1350 words)

  
 Infrared spectroscopy -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Infrared spectroscopy (IR Spectroscopy) is a type of (The use of spectroscopes to analyze spectra) spectroscopy that uses the (The infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum; electromagnetic wave frequencies below the visible range) Infrared portion of the (The entire frequency range of electromagnetic waves) electromagnetic spectrum.
Techniques have been developed to assess the quality of tea-leaves using infrared spectroscopy, this will mean that highly trained experts (also called 'noses') can be used more sparingly, at a significant cost saving.
Infrared spectroscopy is widely used in both research and industry as a simple and reliable technique for measurement, quality control, and dynamic measurement.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/i/in/infrared_spectroscopy.htm   (1035 words)

  
 Spectroscopy - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
It requires the substance to be vaporised at high temperatures by placing it in a spark gap.
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy NMR spectroscopy determines the different local environments of hydrogen or carbon atoms in an organic compound.
It is frequently applied to infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.
open-encyclopedia.com /Spectroscopy   (695 words)

  
 UV-Visible Spectroscopy
As shown on the right, the component colors of the visible portion can be separated by passing sunlight through a prism, which acts to bend the light in differing degrees according to wavelength.
Electromagnetic radiation such as visible light is commonly treated as a wave phenomenon, characterized by a wavelength or frequency.
The presence of chromophores in a molecule is best documented by UV-Visible spectroscopy, but the failure of most instruments to provide absorption data for wavelengths below 200 nm makes the detection of isolated chromophores problematic.
www.cem.msu.edu /~reusch/VirtualText/Spectrpy/UV-Vis/spectrum.htm   (2030 words)

  
 Spectra - Introduction
On a "BIG" scale, we can think of the electromagnetic spectrum, which refers to all the different energies of radiation from the very lowest energy radio waves to the very highest energy gamma-rays.
But since it is hard to examine the whole electromagnetic spectrum at once, scientists often break it down into smaller regions for their studies.
Spectroscopy is one of the fundamental tools which scientists use to study the Universe.
imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov /docs/science/how_l1/spectra.html   (747 words)

  
 Talk:Spectroscopy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Mass spectroscopy is significantly different from the other spectrometers on the page.
I'm not sure either that it was a good idea to move everything under electromagnetic spectroscopy to a separate page.
However, according to Boltzmann_distribution#typical speed, a gas would have to be circa 1e15 K for this to be a significant problem, at which point the gas will not be an ideal gas.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talk:Spectroscopy   (565 words)

  
 Spectroscopy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The mass-to-charge ratio of molecules and atoms are studied in mass spectrometermass spectrometry/.
Spectroscopy using an Atomic force microscopeAFM-based analytical technique is called Force spectroscopy/.
We developed a novel noninvasive technique, differential path-length spectroscopy (DPS), which allows the measurement of hypoxia-related parameters in the superficial microvasculature of tissue.
www.infothis.com /find/Spectroscopy   (1095 words)

  
 History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Spectroscopy is the study of light and how it affects matter.
The electromagnetic spectrum is a diagram that encompasses all the of the wavelengths possible for electromagnetic radiation:
The electromagnetic spectrum can be used to find the wavelength, frequency and energy of photons of light which can give information about how the radiation has affected matter.
www.sas.upenn.edu /~rebryant/History.html   (687 words)

  
 CHP - Spectroscopy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Spectroscopy is the use of the absorption, emission, or scattering of electromagnetic radiation by matter to qualitatively or quantitatively study the matter or to study physical processes.
Scattering might or might not occur with a transfer of energy, i.e., the scattered radiation might or might not have a slightly different wavelength compared to the light incident on the sample.
Spectroscopy Index - information on specific spectroscopic techniques.
www.chem.vt.edu /chem-ed/spec/spectros.html   (187 words)

  
 Infrared Spectroscopy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A unit of length that is frequently used in infrared spectroscopy is the micron.
However, when the frequency of the electromagnetic radiation equals the vibrational frequency of a molecule, absorption of light does occur and this leads to an infrared spectrum that is characteristic of the structure of a molecule.
In cases where infrared spectroscopy is used as a criteria of identity, the spectra under comparison should be obtained under identical experimental conditions.
www.umsl.edu /~orglab/documents/IR/IR2.html   (12089 words)

  
 Organic Chemistry On Line
Most of what we know about the structure of atoms and molecules comes from studying their interaction with light (electromagnetic radiation).
Different regions of the electromagnetic spectrum provide different kinds of information as a result of such interactions.
Realizing that light may be considered to have both wave-like and particle-like characteristics, it is useful to consider that a given frequency or wavelength of light is associated with a "light quanta" of energy we now call a photon.
www.cem.msu.edu /~reusch/VirtualText/Spectrpy/spectro.htm   (655 words)

  
 Laboratory For Surface Modification
IR Study of Molecules Adsorbed on Metal Surfaces by Surface Electromagnetic Wave Spectroscopy, Y. Chabal and A. Sievers, J. Vac.
Infrared Spectroscopy of Hydrogen on Silicon Surfaces, Y.J. Chabal, Physica B 170(1-4), 447 (1991).
Internal Transmission Spectroscopy, Y.J. Chabal in Handbook of Vibrational Spectroscopy, J.M. Chalmers and P.R. Griffiths Eds, John Wiley and Sons, Ltd, 1, 1117 (2002).
lsm.rutgers.edu /updated/chabal/c-pub.html   (5929 words)

  
 Spectroscopy
In order to study electromagnetic radiation from space, astronomers need to separate the radiation according to each of the frequencies present.
For example, an optical telescope detects visible light comprising of electromagnetic waves the frequencies of which range between 500 and 700 nanometers.
The study of spectral lines is known as spectroscopy and is heavily used in astronomy.
archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu /Cyberia/Bima/CBCSpecLines.html   (528 words)

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