Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Ellis Island


Related Topics

In the News (Sat 25 May 19)

  
  Ellis Island - MSN Encarta
Ellis Island is the symbol of American immigration and the immigrant experience.
Ellis Island is a symbol of America’s immigrant heritage.
Ellis Island, complex of one natural and two artificial islands, joined by causeways, in Upper New York Bay, northeastern New Jersey and southeastern New York, near Manhattan.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761554612/Ellis_Island.html   (388 words)

  
 Ellis_Island
Ellis Island was the principal federal immigration station in the United States from 1892 to 1954.
The restoration of Ellis Island began in 1983 and the immigration museum opened in 1990, with the building being restored to the period of 1918-1920.
Ellis Island exists today as a testament to the vital importance of immigration in shaping America and to the millions of people who passed through its doors.
powayusd.sdcoe.k12.ca.us /usonline/worddoc/ellisislandsite.htm   (2696 words)

  
 Ellis Island - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ellis Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor, was at one time the main immigration port for immigrants entering the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Ellis Island is within the boundaries of Jersey City, New Jersey, but is within both the states of New Jersey and New York.
Ellis Island as an entry port to the United States is described in detail in Mottel the Cantor's Son by Sholom Aleichem.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ellis_Island   (2169 words)

  
 Ellis Island -- History
The island was purchased by the colonist governors of Nieuw Amsterdam (later New York) from Native Americans on July 12, 1630, for "certain cargoes, or parcels of goods." The Dutch called it "Little Oyster Island," because of the delicious oysters found in its sands, and used it as a base for oystering.
Ellis Island became host to those who could not be admitted to the United States yet could not be returned to their original homes.
Ellis Island was reopened and dedicated on September 10, 1990, as a unit of the U.S. Department of the Interior's National Park Service, administered by the superintendent of the Statue of Liberty National Monument and Ellis Island.
www.americanparknetwork.com /parkinfo/sl/history/ellis.html   (2611 words)

  
 Immigration: Ellis Island History
To accommodate the size of the new facility, the island was increased to 3.3 acres by means of landfill and a ferry slip was built.
Ellis Island didn't just have architectural flaws, but also was congested with new arrivals due to inadequate living space and stricter inspection policies that slowed the inspection process.
In 1898, Ellis was expanded to a total of seventeen acres while a second island was built by dumping rock and earth taken from the subway tunnels and the Grand Central Station excavation.
library.thinkquest.org /20619/Eihist.html   (1130 words)

  
 History of Ellis Island | Ellis Island | Oh, Ranger!
The island was purchased by the colonial governors of Nieuw Amsterdam (later New York) from American Indians on July 12, 1630, for "certain cargoes, or parcels of goods." The Dutch called it, "Little Oyster Island" because of the delicious oysters found in its sands and used it as a base for oystering.
Ellis Island became host to those who could not be admitted to the United States yet could not be returned to their original homes.
Ellis Island was reopened and dedicated on September 10, 1990, as a unit of the U.S. Depart-ment of the Inte-rior's National Park Service, administered by the super-intendent of the Statue of Liberty National Monument and Ellis Island. 
www.ohranger.com /ellis-island/history-ellis-island   (2976 words)

  
 Lower Manhattan : News | Reliving the Ellis Island Experience
As the ferry enters the slip at Ellis Island, it dips to the starboard side as hundreds of passengers strain to look at the immigration station they are about to enter.
Ellis Island began as a 3.5-acre land mass that barely rose above the bay's high tides.
The result of the astronomically high number of Ellis Island immigrants has had reverberations nationwide, many quite personal: 40 to 45 percent of all Americans are related to someone who came here through the island.
www.lowermanhattan.info /news/reliving_the_ellis_island_11911.asp   (1138 words)

  
 [No title]
Ellis Island, and island complex in the Upper New York Bay, is composed of one natural island and two adjoining artificial islands.
Ellis Island was later passed on to the state of New York.
Ellis Island become the new reception center when the center in New York City become too small to handle the large number of immigrants coming into the United States.
www.iaff.ttu.edu /Home/DPE/CurricMaterial/EllisIsland.asp   (694 words)

  
 New York Architecture Images-ELLIS ISLAND NATIONAL MONUMENT
Ellis Island, at the mouth of the New York Harbor, was at one time the main entry facility for immigrants entering the United States from January 1, 1892 until November 12, 1954.
Ellis island was also known as "The Island of Tears" or "Heartbreak Island"[2] because of the 2% who were not admitted after the long transatlantic voyage.
Ellis Island as a port of entry to the United States of America is described in detail in Mottel the Cantor's Son by Sholom Aleichem.
www.nyc-architecture.com /LM/LM001-ELLISISLAND.htm   (4768 words)

  
 Beyond Manhattan | Ellis Island | History   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ellis Island, which housed an immigration screening center, was the gatekeeper, where all the would-be immigrants disembarked, showing their documents and completed medical evaluations before they were allowed to enter the country.
Ellis Island was closed in November 1954 after tougher immigration laws significantly reduced the number of immigrants coming through its gates.
New York that nearly 90 percent of the present-day island, or 24 acres of landfill, belongs to New Jersey.
www.nyc24.org /2003/islands/zone6/ellishistory.html   (1272 words)

  
 ELLIS ISLAND
To most, Ellis Island was an Isle of Hope, a brief stopping point on the way to a better life.
The sick were taken to Ellis Island hospital for observation and care, and once recovered, could proceed with their legal inspection.
Ellis Island became too costly to run - in 1953 the island's staff numbered roughly 250, to serve approximately 230 detained immigrants.
sydaby.eget.net /swe/ellis_island.htm   (2583 words)

  
 Ellis Island National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)
Opened on January 1, 1892, Ellis Island became the nation's premier federal immigration station.
The Statue of Liberty National Monument is one park that is comprised of Liberty Island (where the Statue is located) and Ellis Island, the historical federal immigration processing center.
Temperature at Ellis Island and in New York Harbor can vary greatly from 0 degrees in Winter to over 100 degrees with high humidity in Summer.
www.nps.gov /elis   (278 words)

  
 Ellis Island - Timeline
Half a decade later, Ellis Island was used to as a munitions arsenal for the Union army during the Civil War.
Ellis Island was selected to be the new immigration processing center to facilitate the large number of immigrants coming to America.
Ellis Island is formally placed under the jurisdiction of the General Services Administration from 1954 to 1964, and all thirty-three structures on the island are officially closed in November, 1954.
www.history.com /minisite.do?content_type=Minisite_Generic&content_type_id=1460&display_order=1&mini_id=1459   (1310 words)

  
 Capturing the 'Dark Side' of Ellis Island : NPR
Ellis Island: Ghosts of Freedom documents the weather-beaten remnants of the immigration hub's abandoned hospital buildings, where people who steamed past the Statue of Liberty on crowded ships were sometimes held back if they had an infectious disease or obvious disorder.
In the shadow of Ellis Island's Great Hall, forgotten by history and woefully ill-equipped in its battle with nature, I came upon the ruins of a vast hospital: the contagious-disease wards and isolation rooms for the people whose spirits carried them across oceans but whose bodies failed them, a stone's throw from Paradise.
The Island itself, rising in the water one mile from the tip of Lower Manhattan, was originally 3.3 acres in size.
www.npr.org /templates/story/story.php?storyId=6600709   (1164 words)

  
 Immigration Station   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Unlike Ellis Island, the state park has no access to any of the immigration records accumulated during the era that the station was located on the island.
Although it was billed as the "Ellis Island of the West", within the Immigration Service it was known as "The Guardian of the Western Gate" and was designed control the flow of Chinese into the country, who were officially not welcome with the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882.
The Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to raising funds to educate, preserve, restore, and improve the site.
www.angelisland.org /immigr02.html   (1605 words)

  
 Genealogyweb presents....Ellis Island   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ellis Island is a small island in Upper New York Bay, although in New Jersey waters, it is under the political jurisdiction of New York.
At Ellis, immigrants were examined and either admitted or deported; at the height of its activity, the Ellis Island station could process 1 million people a year.
From 1900 to 1910, almost 95 percent of the immigrants arriving at Ellis Island were joining either family or friends.
www.genealogyweb.com /ellisisland.html   (1564 words)

  
 CNN - New Jersey wins claim to Ellis Island - May 26, 1998
The high court, by a 6-3 vote, declared that Ellis Island, the site of the landmark U.S. immigration processing center from the 1890s until 1954, belongs largely to New Jersey in a case that mainly involved symbolic bragging rights.
The federal government actually owns Ellis Island, which was the first American soil walked upon by 17 million immigrants between 1892 and 1954.
People born on Ellis Island were listed as having been born in New York, and the census listed Ellis Island residents as New Yorkers, the state's lawyers told the justices during oral arguments in January.
www.cnn.com /US/9805/26/scotus.ellis.island   (666 words)

  
 New York City - Ellis Island pictures and history
Ellis Island and nearby Liberty Island—home to the Statue of Liberty—are administered by the National Park Service.
The Ellis Island site commemorates immigrants' courage and details the sometimes less than ideal welcome that they received particularly in the early years when graft, corruption and cruelty would best describe the inspection process they were required to endure.
Ellis Island Chronicles tells the story of the island including its physical growth from the original 3.3 acre island to its current 27.5 acres.
www.inetours.com /New_York/Pages/Ellis_Island.html   (974 words)

  
 Ellis Island
The island used to be smaller--only 3.3 acres.
On June 14, 1897, the new Ellis Island facility burned to the ground.
Ellis Island is now part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument.
www.uen.org /utahlink/activities/view_activity.cgi?activity_id=3810   (987 words)

  
 STLI Service 2 Description
The new structure on Ellis Island, built of "Georgia pine", opened on January 1, 1892; Annie Moore, a 15 year-old Irish girl, accompanied by her two brothers, entered history and a new country as she was the very first immigrant to be processed at Ellis Island.
This document was used by immigration inspectors at Ellis Island to cross examine the immigrant during the legal (or primary) inspection.
The Ellis Island Oral History Project, based at the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, is the oldest and largest oral history project dedicated to preserving the first-hand recollections of immigrants coming to America during the years Ellis Island was in operation: 1892-1954.
www.nps.gov /stli/serv02.htm   (5479 words)

  
 Ellis Island | Oh, Ranger!
Ellis Island Immigration Center On April 17, 2001, the Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, Inc. opened an exciting family history research facility, the American Family Immigration History Center, at the Ellis Island Immig...
Ferry Building Restoration The Ellis Island Ferry Building is the first of 30 un-restored buildings on Ellis Island for which Save Ellis Island, working in partnership with the National Park Service, has raised the funds to co...
History of Ellis Island THE EARLY YEARS Located in the upper New York Bay, a short distance from the New Jersey shore, Ellis Island was originally known to American Indians as Kioshk, or Gull Island, named for the birds tha...
www.ohranger.com /ellis-island   (1141 words)

  
 Ellis Island
This is a collection of twenty-four photographs including several views of Ellis Island and the Immigration buildings as well as various groups of immigrants during and after processing.
Rebekah, a fifteen-year-old Jewish immigrant arriving in New York City through Ellis Island in 1902, almost abandons her dream of getting an education when she is forced to work in a sweatshop.
Describes the history, closing, and restoration of the Ellis Island immigration center and depicts the experiences of the immigrants who came to Ellis Island at the turn of the twentieth century.
www.libsci.sc.edu /miller/EllisIsland.htm   (1656 words)

  
 Ellis Island
Ellis Island was the last stop for immigrants leaving Europe and coming to America from 1892-1954.
Ellis Island was closed for immigration in 1954.
In 1990 the island was reopened to the public as a museum.
www.rockyhill.org /Lower/ellisisland/ellisisland.html   (320 words)

  
 Ellis Island Records - Immigration records, archives, information on the immigrants and the museum
Ellis Island Immigrant Records - Passenger manifest records were kept of the more than 22 million people who entered the United States through Ellis Island.
Ellis Island Museum - Because of its unique historical importance, the Ellis Island was declared part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument in 1965.
Ellis Island Genealogy - Next to vital records and census records, immigrant records are key to family hisories and genealogy research.
www.ellisislandimmigrants.org   (411 words)

  
 Ellis Island Immigrants
Ellis Island Records create links to millions of immigrant ancestors from all over the world.
Pine-frame buildings on Ellis Island are burned to the ground in a disastrous fire.
Ellis Island closes, marking an end to mass immigration.
www.ellisislandimmigrants.org /ellis_island_immigrants.htm   (483 words)

  
 Ellis Island | Scholastic.com
Ellis Island is a small island in Upper New York Bay, lying about 1.6 km (1 mi) southwest of the Battery, on Manhattan, and about 396 m (1,300 ft) east of Jersey City, N.J. Although in New Jersey waters, it was long under the political jurisdiction of New York.
The island, originally 1.3 ha (3.3 acres) but over time enlarged by mostly landfill to 11.1 ha (27.5 acres), was a major U.S. immigration station from 1892 to 1943 and an immigrant detention station until 1954.
There immigrants were examined and either admitted or deported; at the height of its activity, the Ellis Island station could process 1 million people a year.
content.scholastic.com /browse/article.jsp?id=5017   (453 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.