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Topic: Embalming


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In the News (Sat 25 May 19)

  
  Embalming
Embalming is a physically invasive process in which special devices are implanted, and chemicals and techniques are used to give an appearance of restful repose.
The funeral industry promotes embalming and viewing as a means to show "proper respect for the body," and to establish the "clear identity" of the corpse so that the reality of death cannot be denied by those who view the body.
Embalming gives funeral homes a sales opportunity to increase consumer spending (by as much as $3,000 or more) for additional body preparation, a more expensive casket with "protective" features perhaps, a more expensive outer burial container, and a more elaborate series of ceremonies.
www.funerals.org /faq/embalm.htm   (1308 words)

  
  Embalming - LoveToKnow 1911
More commonly they were embalmed in a mixture of sand and asphalt, and buried in vases, or canopi, placed near the mummy, the abdomen being filled with chips and sawdust of cedar and a small quantity of natron.
In one jar were placed the stomach and large intestine; in another, the small intestines; in a third, the lungs and heart; in a fourth, the gall-bladder and liver.
The Guanches, the aborigines of the Canaries, employed a mode of embalming similar to that of the Egyptians, filling the hollow caused by the removal of the viscera with salt and an absorbent vegetable powder (see Bory de Saint Vincent, Essais sur les Iles Fortunees, 1803, p.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Embalming   (970 words)

  
 Baris Funeral Home, Clyde NY, Wayne County - Embalming   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Embalming is primarily done to disinfect and preserve the remains.
To begin the embalming process, which is the removal of blood, and replacing it with a formaldehyde based fluid, a small incision is usually made on the remains right side of the lower neck.
The basic theory is to pump embalming fluid into the artery, and this will cause the blood to return through the veins and flow outside the remains for disposal.
www.baris.net /bfh/embalm.html   (1426 words)

  
  Funeral-Packages.com | Embalming
Embalming is used for two primary reasons: to allow adequate time between death and burial to observe social customs such as visitations and funeral services, and to prevent the spread of infection.
Embalming consists primarily of removing all blood and gases from the body and the insertion of a disinfecting fluid.
Although not required by law in most cases, embalming may be required depending on such factors as whether the family selected a service with a viewing of the deceased; if the deceased is going to be transported; or because of the length of time prior to cremation or burial.
www.funeral-packages.com /main-25.html   (389 words)

  
 embalming facts
Embalming is a physically invasive process in which special devices are implanted, and chemicals and techniques are used to give an appearance of restful repose.
Embalming is considered a desecration of the body by orthodox Jewish and Muslin religions.
The funeral industry promotes embalming and viewing as a means to show "proper respect for the body," and to establish the "clear identity" of the corpse so that the reality of death cannot be denied by those who view the body.
www.bannockpride.com /embalming.html   (383 words)

  
 Embalming
The modern embalming process is designed to retard tissue decomposition for the period of time necessary for disposition as arranged for by the family of the deceased.
Embalming is accomplished by a chemical "fixation" of the cell protein.
In modern embalming then, an embalming fluid that is both a disinfectant and a preservative is injected into the circulatory system of the body by an electric pump while the blood is forced out of the body and disposed of.
members.tripod.com /annwyn/embalm.html   (2417 words)

  
 Embalming--Is It for Christians? - Jehovah's Witnesses Official Web Site
He commanded "his servants, the physicians, to embalm his father." According to the account found in Genesis chapter 50, the physicians took the customary 40 days to prepare the corpse.
Perhaps early interest in and experimentation with embalming was sparked by the discovery of bodies that had been buried in desert sand and were naturally preserved.
The embalming of Jacob was not meant as a precedent for the nation of Israel or for the Christian congregation.
www.watchtower.org /e/20020315/article_01.htm   (1167 words)

  
 Embalming Table - Kansas Historical Society
Embalming the human body after death is a procedure that dates back to the ancient Egyptians.
During the embalming process, the deceased is laid upon an embalming table and cleaned with a disinfectant.
This embalming table was used at the Argonia Mortuary by Ervin C. "Dutch" Moore and his wife, Alice M. Moore, from 1965 to 1979.
www.kshs.org /cool3/embalmtable.htm   (252 words)

  
 embalming
Arsenic embalming began as a sanitary practice and a practical means to preserve the body until burial or for transport.
Thomas Holmes, the "father of American embalming," was engaged by the medical department of the Union Army to set up battlefield embalming stations to enable the bodies of Union dead to be returned home.
Embalming and metal containers added cost to funeral arrangements, and were generally only used by those who could afford them.
www.waterindustry.org /arsenic-3.htm   (2095 words)

  
 Embalming Fluid
Embalming fluid is a compound of formaldehyde, methanol, ethanol and other solvents.
Embalming fluid is usually found in morgues and funeral homes, however, the fluid also can be purchased directly from chemical companies in person or from the Internet.
Effects from exposure to embalming fluid include: bronchitis, body tissue destruction, brain damage, lung damage, impaired coordination, and inflammation and sores in the throat, nose, and esophagus.
www.streetdrugs.org /embalm.htm   (271 words)

  
 Exeter City Council - Embalming
Embalming is defined as the preservation of a body from decay, originally with spices and, more recently, through arterial injection of embalming fluid.
Embalming is particularly evident amongst larger commercial funeral directors in urban locations.
Embalming may also be recommended as a pre-requisite to 'viewing', the implication being that an unembalmed body may cause distress.
www.exeter.gov.uk /index.aspx?articleid=1523   (1129 words)

  
 Erowid PCP Vault : Embalming Fluid, Wet, Fry
There appears to be a current trend of the use of substances known alternately by the slang names 'embalming fluid', 'fry', 'formaldehyde', 'wet', 'water', or 'amp'.
It is entirely possible (actually quite likely) that the confusion between PCP and embalming fluid (formaldehyde) has gone so far as to cause a new trend where PCP is actually mixed with formaldehye (or other 'embalming fluids') and used as a recreational psychoactive.
Embalming fluid, as used in a mortuary, is traditionally made from formaldehyde.
www.erowid.org /chemicals/pcp/pcp_info6.shtml   (344 words)

  
 Embalming--The Basic about Embalming and Funeral Services
We use embalming today for two primary reasons--to allow adequate time between death and burial to observe social customs such as visitations and funeral services, and to prevent the spread of infection.
Small incisions are made in either the carotid or femoral artery and the jugular or femoral vein; the disinfecting fluid is injected through the carotid or femoral artery, and the blood is drained from the jugular or femoral vein.
Embalming may be necessary, however, if you select certain funeral arrangements, such as a funeral with viewing.
www.funeralplan.com /products/embalming.html   (514 words)

  
 embalming. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Although the embalming methods of the Egyptians varied according to the wealth and rank of the deceased, bodies were usually immersed for several weeks in a soda solution after the body cavities had been filled with resins and spices.
Viscera were sometimes embalmed separately and either replaced in the body or preserved in canopic jars.
Traditional embalming methods were largely abandoned with the spread of Christianity, but preservation of bodies continued in Egypt for several centuries.
www.bartelby.com /65/em/embalmin.html   (252 words)

  
 HealthWeb : Mortuary Science: Mortuary Practice: Embalming   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Embalming anatomical donors (individuals who donate their entire bodies to science) is markedly different from embalming individuals for burial.
The article highlights three primary differences in embalming techniques for these two groups: the position of the body on the embalming table, the appropriate type and strength of embalming fluid, and the injection and draining methods of the arterial solutions.
In the past, embalmers used embalming powders to absorb fluids and odors in the deceased body during the embalming process.
www.healthweb.org /browse.cfm?categoryid=534   (632 words)

  
 ICFA: Embalming questions
Embalming is a temporary preservation of a dead human person.
You are not required to have embalming if you selected arrangements such as direct cremation or immediate burial.
It may depend on such factors as whether the family selected a service with a public or private viewing of the body with an open casket; if the body is going to be transported by air or rail; or because of the length of time prior to the burial or cremation.
www.icfa.org /embalming.htm   (198 words)

  
 Embalming Video | Embalming Process Videos | Embalming Procedures
The central theme of each embalming video is to give the viewer a behind the scenes look at embalming; some videos provide a more in-depth look than others in disclosing procedures and practices.
"Unlocking the Mysteries of Embalming", an educational documentary that delves into the principals of embalming, a basic simplistic overview of embalming and is a great source of information for anyone wanting clarity on embalming.
The theories, practices, methods of application of embalming techniques applied on human remains is unmasked in our collection of embalming videos and who want to unravel one of life's many mysteries surrounding death.
www.bluelips.com /cat_embalming.cfm   (198 words)

  
 Embalming
In view of America's highly mobile society, embalming permits friends and family to travel great distances, often several days after a death, to attend the funeral ceremony and allows the body to be buried at some place other than where death occurred.
Embalming is not routinely required by law, but may be necessary if death is due to certain diseases; if final disposition is not made within a prescribed period of time; if refrigeration or immediate burial is not available; or if a body is to be transported between states or internationally in a common carrier.
Funeral directors may require embalming if the funeral ceremony selected by a family includes viewing, and they are generally required to ask permission of the deceased's next-of-kin verbally or in writing before embalming.
www.gardenchapel.com /embalming.html   (435 words)

  
 Embalming
To begin the embalming process, which is the removal of blood, and replacing it with a formaldehyde based fluid, a small incision is usually made on the remains right side of the lower neck.
The basic theory is to pump embalming fluid into the artery, and this will cause the blood to return through the veins and flow outside the remains for disposal.
Many embalming chemicals have a slight dye added to them, which gives the remains a pinkish glow, and also acts as a guide for the funeral director, making it visible for him to see the fluid as it travels through the remains.
www.moore-funeral-homes.com /Embalming_-70516.html   (1454 words)

  
 Embalming - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Embalming, mortuary custom, the art of preserving bodies after death, generally by the use of chemical substances.
Embalming a mummy generally took about 70 days.
Right after death the deceased’s body was taken to an embalming workshop, where specialists washed...
encarta.msn.com /Embalming.html   (102 words)

  
 Havering - Embalming
Embalming is defined as 'the preservation of a body from decay, originally with spices and more recently through arterial injection of embalming fluid'.
The process is generally referred to as 'cosmetic embalming' and is used to improve the visual appearance of the body and prevent deterioration in the period leading up to the funeral.
It takes at least one hour to correctly embalm a body and the charge for this is between £40 and £60 (in 2002), which includes the cost of chemicals and so on.
www.havering.gov.uk /index.cfm?articleid=4463   (1045 words)

  
 AJ'S MORBID EMBALMING TECHNIQUES
The embalming fluid is prepared from propylene glycol which keeps the muscles moist; 10% buffered formalin used as a fixative; isopropyl alcohol used as a preservative; and liquefied phenol, which is used as a mold preventative.
Before the embalming fluid is injected, air is removed from the connecting tube to avoid any possible airlocks produced by the vessels of the cadaver during the injection of the fluid.
The embalming fluid provides the embalmed body with moderate degrees of mobility of the neck, shoulder, pelvic girdles, and limbs and at the same time, yields an adequate degree of hardness of the muscles for dissection (Bradbury, 1971).
www.geocities.com /morbidaj/embalm.htm   (2055 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Embalming
Although the embalming methods of the Egyptians varied according to the wealth and rank of the deceased, bodies were usually immersed for several weeks in a soda solution after the body cavities had been filled with resins and spices.
Viscera were sometimes embalmed separately and either replaced in the body or preserved in canopic jars.
Traditional embalming methods were largely abandoned with the spread of Christianity, but preservation of bodies continued in Egypt for several centuries.
www.reference.com /browse/columbia/embalmin   (208 words)

  
 Educational Memorial Programs | Protocols For Embalming   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The stock embalming solution is diluted 1 part with 3 parts of water and pumped into the animal (yielding an effective formalin level of 3.25%).
As the embalmed solution starts flowing into the animal the external jugular vein is punctured to force out blood along with the previously injected Permaflow solution.
The catheter is connected to a small-bore tube attached to the peristaltic pump and embalming fluid is pumped at a flow rate of 50 ml per minute.
www.educationalmemorial.org /resource_embalming.html   (451 words)

  
 Facts on Embalming by Booga   (Site not responding. Last check: )
There are several reasons for embalming, the biggest being in the interest of public health, however, the most important to the bereaved family is the restorative value which allows the funeral director to achieve a more natural appearance of the deceased for viewing.
The concept behind embalming is fairly simple, that is to remove and/or neutralize any disease, bacteria, virus or other organism which poses potential problems of unpleasant odors or appearance of the deceased or possible transmission of infectious disease to the public.
After the embalming process is complete the remains are thoroughly cleansed and allowed to sit for a while (usually overnight) to allow the embalming fluids to take full effect.
www.glemon.com /embalm.htm   (1189 words)

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