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Topic: Emperor Kotoku of Japan


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In the News (Sun 13 Apr 14)

  
  Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Kotoku Shusui
Kotoku Shusui (November 4, 1871 - January 24, 1911) was a socialist and anarchist who played a leading role in introducing anarchism to Japan in the early 20th century, particularly by translating the works of contemporary European and Russian anarchists, such as Peter Kropotkin, into Japanese.
Kotoku moved from his birthplace, the town of Nakamura[?] in the Kochi prefecture, to Tokyo in his mid-teens and became a journalist there in 1893.
Kotoku was hung along with twelve others on 24th January, 1911, even though only four of the hundreds arrested were found to be involved in a planned attempt on the Emperor's life, and Kotoku wasn't one of them.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/ko/Kotoku_Shusui   (782 words)

  
 THE ANARCHIST MOVEMENT IN JAPAN - Chapter One: 1906-1911
Japan's popular image is of a hierarchical and regimented society, while the Japanese are widely regarded as unswervingly loyal servants of the company and the state.
Even within Japan there are many Japanese who are unaware of the anarchist movement's existence, of the martyrs who have died for the cause, and of the sustained struggle that has been fought against the capitalist state and the inhumanity it has perpetrated over the years.
That she should have discovered the anarchist movement only after leaving Japan is a good illustration of the extent to which the existence of Japanese anarchism has been omitted from the officially sponsored historical record, filtered out of the education curriculum and ignored by the mass media.
www.spunk.org /texts/places/japan/sp001883/japchap1.html   (4944 words)

  
  Emperor Kotoku of Japan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Emperor Kōtoku (孝徳天皇) (597-654) was the 36th imperial ruler of Japan.
He was a descendant of the Emperor Bidatsu.
Nakanoōe ignored the emperor's policy and moved to the former province.
www.peekskill.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Emperor_Kotoku_of_Japan   (356 words)

  
 Emperor Kotoku - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
was the 36th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
Naka no Ōe held the rank of crown prince and was the de facto leader of the government.
Japanese dates correspond to the traditional lunisolar calendar used in Japan until 1873.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Emperor_Kotoku_of_Japan   (345 words)

  
 Art of Japan
A long time ago Japanese Emperors and other rich and important officials were buried in a chamber made of stone that was buried in great clumps of earth.
In the beginning of the Heian period from, 552 to 897, Buddhism was introduced to Japan from travelers, tourists, and visitors of China and Korea.
A lot of paintings in Japan have beautiful back-rounds of mountains and valleys with streams and rivers going towards waterfalls while paintings have backgrounds that are just plain white.
www.kyrene.org /schools/brisas/sunda/arthistory/japan.htm   (760 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Japan
The seas which surround Japan are the Pacific Ocean on the east, the Sea of Okhotsk on the North, the Sea of Japan on the west, and the China Sea on the south.
Fifteen are appointed by the emperor, the remaining twenty-five by the minister at the nomination of the former.
On 12 Sept., 1885, a letter written from Leo XIII to the Emperor of Japan was received with great honour, and on 18 December of the same year, a representative of the emperor assisted respectfully at the ceremony of the funeral service for Alphonso XII, King of Spain.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/08297a.htm   (17760 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Empress Jito of Japan
His Imperial Majesty, Emperor Akihito of Japan The Emperor of Japan (天皇, tennō) is Japans titular head of state and the head of the Japanese imperial family.
Emperor Tenji of Japan (From Ogura Hyakunin Isshu) Tomb of Emperor Tenji, Kyoto Emperor Tenji (天智天皇) (626-672), also known as Tenchi, was the 38th imperial ruler of Japan.
Emperor Mommu (文武天皇) (683-707) was the 42nd imperial ruler of Japan.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Empress-Jito-of-Japan   (513 words)

  
 Japan [Definition]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
A legend says that its origins lie in the days of Mongol invasions of Japan in the 13th century, when the Buddhist priest Nichiren was supposed to have offered the sun disc flag to the Emperor of Japan, who was considered a descendant of the sun goddess Amaterasu....
EmperorThe Emperor of Japan (天皇, tennō) is Japan's titular head of state and the head of the Japanese imperial family.
Akihito is the eldest son and the fifth child of the Emperor Showa (Hirohito) and the Empress Kojun (Nagako).
www.wikimirror.com /Japan   (5191 words)

  
 Kotoku Shusui - Leading Role in Introducing Anarchism to Japan
Kotoku Shusui (November 4 or September 23, 1871 - January 24, 1911) was a socialist and anarchist who played a leading role in introducing anarchism to Japan in the early 20th century, particularly by translating the works of contemporary European and Russian anarchists, such as Peter Kropotkin, into Japanese.
Kotoku moved from his birthplace, the town of Nakamura in the Kochi prefecture, to Tokyo in his mid-teens and became a journalist there in 1893.
Kotoku was hung along with twelve others on 24th January, 1911, even though only four of the hundreds arrested were found to be involved in a planned attempt on the Emperor's life, and Kotoku wasn't one of them.
www.japan-101.com /history/kotoku_shusui.htm   (809 words)

  
 Emperor Sushun of Japan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Emperor Sushun (崇峻天皇) was the 32nd imperial ruler of Japan (587-592).
He was the twelfth son of the Emperor Kimmei by Oane no kimi, a daughter of Soga no Iname who was the chief of the Soga clan. His name in birth was Prince Hatsusebe (長谷部皇子, Hatsusebe no miko).
He succeeded his half brother, Emperor Yomei in 587 with the support of the Soga clan and the Empress Suiko, his half sister and the widow of the Emperor Bidatsu.
www.kiwipedia.com /en/emperor-sushun-of-japan.html   (151 words)

  
 Emperor Kotoku of Japan - Definition, explanation
Emperor Kōtoku (孝徳天皇) (597-654) was the 36th imperial ruler of Japan.
He was a descendant of the Emperor Bidatsu.
Nakanoōe held the rank of crown prince and was the de facto leader of the government.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/e/em/emperor_kotoku_of_japan.php   (346 words)

  
 Japan, 500–1000 A.D. | Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
While this is the traditional account of the introduction of Buddhism into Japan, in actuality the Japanese court probably learned of the religion earlier from Korean and Chinese traders and immigrants.
Until 710, the capital city is usually moved after the death of the reigning emperor.
The practice of marrying their daughters to emperors and serving as regents to the resulting sons, who are frequently enthroned at a young age, forms the basis of Fujiwara influence.
www.metmuseum.org /toah/ht/06/eaj/ht06eaj.htm   (1249 words)

  
 Japanese History | History of Japan :: Japan Visitor   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
In Japan in 587AD the Soga clan was victorious in a civil war defeating its rivals the Mononobe and Nakatomi clan and heralding the formal acceptance of Buddhism which it had overseen the introduction of from the mainland.
Emperor Kotoku ascended the throne in 654 and, free of Soga influence, moved the Court out of Soga territory to Naniwa (present day Osaka).
The first Heian Emperor Kammu was probably the most powerful of any Emperor before or since, but after his death in 806 the Fujiwara increased in political power by providing the imperial house with Fujiwara concubines and imperial consorts, thus forging marriage bonds that gave Fujiwara nobles access to the highest Court administrative positions.
www.japanvisitor.com /index.php?cID=359&pID=334&cName=Japanese   (5178 words)

  
 Oinari, Fox Spirit, God of Japan, Photo Dictionary of Japanese Buddhist & Shinto Deities
In Japan, however, Daikoku-ten is one of Japan's Seven Lucky Gods and venerated as the luck-bringing protector of the earth, farming and farmers, commerce, and overall good fortune.
Another similar theory is that Inari was syncretized with "Dakini-ten." In Japan, Dakini-ten are the various manifestations of Dakini, and were generally associated with Daikoku-ten (Mahakala), who is considered the Hindu god of the Five Cereals (later becomes god of Buddhism, and today is one of Japan's Seven Lucky Gods).
And in Japan, the fox spirit or kitsune arrived from China during the T'ang Dyansty (there is even a Japanese legend explaining that it flew over), where it joined the native tanuki (a shape-changing badger), and became an integral part of the national folklore.
www.onmarkproductions.com /html/oinari.shtml   (5162 words)

  
 Notes On Feudal Japan
A new emperor, Kotoku, was installed and a new family, the Fujiwara, was created; this new family was to breed with and politically dominate the throne for many hundreds of years.
All existing rice paddies were considered public land that could be freely redistributed by the Emperor, and a census was conducted in 670 to determine the nature of the population.
Although the Emperor is the logical apex of this structure, most of his time was spent ensconced away from the lower classes who were not allowed to lay eyes upon him.
www.blueladder.com /education/whistjapannotes1.htm   (1784 words)

  
 Go-Kotoku of Japan (Toyotomi) - Alternative History - a Wikia wiki   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Emperor Go-Kôtoku (1746-1820) was the 113th Emperor of Japan.
Japan also lost most of Chôxen, and almost all of India and Indonesia.
Japan swept across North America, at its height, ruling almost all of North America, save only parts of Canada and what is now the North American Confederation east of the Appalachian mountains.
althistory.wikia.com /wiki/Go-Kotoku_of_Japan_(Toyotomi)   (562 words)

  
 Emperor Yomei of Japan -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Emperor Yōmei (用明天皇) (died (Click link for more info and facts about 587) 587) was the 31st (Click link for more info and facts about imperial ruler) imperial ruler of (A constitutional monarchy occupying the Japanese Archipelago; a world leader in electronics and automobile manufacture and ship building) Japan.
He was the fourth son of the Emperor (Click link for more info and facts about Kimmei) Kimmei by Kitashihime, a (Click link for more info and facts about Soga) Soga woman and daughter of Soga no Iname.
Yomei was in favor of (The teaching of Buddha that life is permeated with suffering caused by desire, that suffering ceases when desire ceases, and that enlightenment obtained through right conduct and wisdom and meditation releases one from desire and suffering and rebirth) Buddhism.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/E/Em/Emperor_Yomei_of_Japan.htm   (441 words)

  
 Emperor Kotoku of Japan -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
He was a descendant of the Emperor (Click link for more info and facts about Bidatsu) Bidatsu.
He had at least three consorts including his Empress, Hashihito no Himemiko (Princess Hashihito), the daughter of the Emperor (Click link for more info and facts about Jomei) Jomei and his sister Kogyoku.
In 653 Kotoku sent an embassy to (Click link for more info and facts about Sui dynasty) Sui dynasty, but not all ships could reach China because of wrecking.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/e/em/emperor_kotoku_of_japan.htm   (402 words)

  
 Go-Kotoku of Japan (Toyotomi) - Alternative History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Emperor Go-Kôtoku (1746-1820) was the 113th Emperor of Japan.
Japan also lost most of Chôxen, and almost all of India and Indonesia.
Japan swept across North America, at its height, ruling almost all of North America, save only parts of Canada and what is now the North American Confederation east of the Appalachian mountains.
althistory.wikicities.com /wiki/Go-Kotoku_of_Japan_%28Toyotomi%29   (522 words)

  
 Taika Reform Edicts
A.D.) and the Taika Reform Edicts of Emperor Kotoku.
Japan, however, was still largely a Neolithic culture; it would take centuries for the ideal of the Chinese style emperor to take root.
In the reign of the Emperor who ruled the world in the Palace of Wosada 8, Soga no Mumako no Sukune, influenced by reverence for his deceased father, continued to prize highly the doctrines of Buddha.
www.wsu.edu:8080 /~dee/ANCJAPAN/TAIKA.HTM   (4329 words)

  
 Real Samurai History of Japan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
Monks-rulers, and the warrior-monks who constanly presented a menace all over Japan (from their temples of Eastern Mountain's Kiyomizu, Mount Hiei's Enryaku, Nara's Todai, and so on, they always threatened the Emperors, Regents, Chief Ministers, and the like with wars), would be the characteristics of Japanese Buddhism, which marked a separation from Chinese Buddhism.
Emperor Hirohito created an emotional quake all over his realm by denouncing the belief of 1,945 years that his patriarch was the son of the Goddess of the Sun.
Japan has been the greatest economic power in the continent, but it's also the only one in the world which doesn't even have what it takes to kill mosquitoes.
www.geocities.com /kazenaga23/nihongi.htm   (8681 words)

  
 SaruDama: Taika Reform Edicts - Taika no Kaishin - Japanese History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
It could be argued that at this this moment in time, Japan cultivated much of its understanding of the divine status of its Emperor directly from Chinese intuitions.
The confusion arises from that fact that during this same period, several other statements and "decrees" were made by Emperor Kotoku which undoudtely relate to the decrees but are not themselves such.
But the people, who have always trusted in the civilizing influence exercised by the Emperors, and who are used to old customs, will certainly find it hard to wait until these edicts are made.
www.sarudama.com /japanese_history/taikareform.shtml   (2097 words)

  
 Saimei
Empress Saimei (斉明天皇;) was the 37th imperial ruler of Japan and the second woman to hold the position.
She had previously held the position as Empress Kogyoku.
The text of this article is licensed under the GFDL.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/em/Empress_Saimei_of_Japan.html   (47 words)

  
 Category:Japanese emperors - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
This category contains the Emperors and Empresses of Japan.
The role of the Emperor of Japan (天皇, tennō) alternated between that of a high-rank cleric with largely symbolic powers and that of an actual imperial ruler, from the dawn of history until the mid-twentieth century.
Under Japan's modern constitution, the emperor is now a largely titular head of state (see Politics of Japan).
www.sevenhills.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Category:Japanese_emperors   (129 words)

  
 Learn Kendo Discussion :: View topic - JAPAN's early contact(s) with CHINA and KOREA...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-29)
It was the Paekche who went to Japan to pick up one of their princes and put him on the throne for sake of continuing the war efforts with Silla/Tang.
It was from the mouth of this Japanese Emmissary that Emperor Yangdi confirmed the existence of Ryukyu, an island to the southwest of Japan.
The validity of the claim is usually a dispute, because Japan did not possess the metallergy for producing the kind of bronze or iron sword that Emperor Jimmu had used.
learnkendo.cheness.com /viewtopic.php?t=295   (9444 words)

  
 Japan
The Yamato, one of many warring clans, unified central Japan; Yamato chiefs are the likely ancestors of the imperial family.
1192 Emperor gave Yoritomo the title of shogun (general); the shogun ruled in the name of the emperor.
The country is made up of a group of islands east of North and South Korea, of which the four major islands are Hokkaido, Honshu, Kyushu, and Shikoku, situated between the Sea of Japan (to the west) and the north Pacific (to the east).
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/countryfacts/japan.html   (1015 words)

  
 Empress Kogyoku of Japan - Art History Online Reference and Guide
She was the wife and empress of the Emperor Jomei.
After Emperor Kotoku died, though Nakanooe was the crown prince, he had his mother reascend the throne, and remained as the crown prince under his mother.
The allied army of Japan and Baekje was prepared the war against Silla but on July 24 (Japanese calendar), 661 she died in the Asakura Palace before the army departed to Korea.
www.arthistoryclub.com /art_history/Saimei   (373 words)

  
 ::About Osaka : City of Osaka, Japan - North American Office, Chicago, IL [Osaka, Kansai, Osaka City, Japan]
The Emperor Kotoku left Asuka, until then the traditional capital-city of Japan and moved the capital to "Naniwa Nagara Toyosaki-no-miya", now modern-day Osaka, in order to oppose the huge pressure of the Sui and Tang Empires.
Osaka was restored from the ashes of war into an economic hub and became known as the "Kitchen of Japan" during the Edo era.
The Tekijuku was located near Doshomachi, the center of medical commerce in Japan, and many talented minds gathered in Osaka from all parts of the country to study sciences freely.
www.osakacity.org /osaka/history.aspx   (1245 words)

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