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Topic: Emperor Taiwu of Northern Wei


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In the News (Fri 19 Jul 19)

  
  Emperor Taiwu of Northern Wei - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
was an emperor of the Chinese/Xianbei dynasty Northern Wei.
Emperor Taiwu was pleased by prophecies that Kou was making, which implied that he was divine in origin, and he officially endorsed Kou's proselytization of his state.
Emperor Taiwu defeated him in battle, causing him to be unable to return to Tongwan and forcing him to flee to Shanggui (上邽, in modern Tianshui, Gansu), allowing Emperor Taiwu to capture Tongwan.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Emperor_Taiwu_of_Northern_Wei   (5063 words)

  
 Emperor Mingyuan of Northern Wei - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
During his reign, Northern Wei's territory did not expand as much as it did under either his father's reign or the reign of his son Emperor Taiwu, but he helped the state stabilize over northern China, and started the tradition of meeting with important imperial officials to listen to their advice and make final decisions.
In 409, Emperor Daowu was intent on creating Tuoba Si crown prince, but based on the Tuoba tradition that when an heir is decided upon, his mother must be put to death, Emperor Daowu forced Consort Liu to commit suicide.
Emperor Mingyuan executed Weichi and then sent messengers to rebuke Liu Yu and Wang Zhongde, both of whom restated that the target was Later Qin, not Northern Wei, and that the city would be returned as soon as the campaign was over.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Emperor_Mingyuan_of_Northern_Wei   (2027 words)

  
 Han Dynasty: A period of prosperity
Emperor Wu (Han Wudi) consolidated and extended the Chinese empire by pushing back the Xiongnu(sometimes identified with the Huns) into the steppes of modern Inner Mongolia, wresting from them the modern areas of Gansu, Ningxia and Qinghai.
Later on, Emperor Taiwu of Northern Wei reunified the north again, marking the beginning of the Northern Dynasties, a sequence of local regimes ruling over the regions north of Chang Jiang.
Along with the refugees from the North, Emperor Yuan of Jin China reinstated the Jin regime at present Nanjing in the south.
www.archira.com /han.html   (935 words)

  
 ipedia.com: History of China Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Emperor Guangwu of Han China reinstated the Han dynasty with the support of land-holding and merchant families at Luoyang, east of Xian; hence the new era is termed the Eastern Han Dynasty.
Along with the refugees from the North, Emperor Yuan of Jin China reinstated the Jin regime at Nanjing in the south; from this came the sequence of Southern dynasties of Song, Qi, Liang and Chen, which all had their capitals at Jiankang (near today's Nanjing).
Emperor Kangxi commanded the most complete dictionary of Chinese characters ever put together at the time, and under Emperor Qianlong, the compilation of a catalogue of all important works on Chinese culture was made.
www.ipedia.com /history_of_china.html   (3958 words)

  
 Juan Juan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
The term Rouran (柔然;) was a Chinese language transciption of the pronunciation of the name the confederacy used to refer to itself.
Their frequent intervention and invasions had profoundly affected neighboring countries although its power was broken by a newer alliance of Gokturks, the Chinese Northern Qi and Northern Zhou dynasties and tribes in Central Asia in 560s.
The Chinese Northern Wei Dynasty, for instance, had established six major garrisons bordering the Juan Juan, which later became the foci of native Xianbei uprising against sinicized Xianbei in early 6th century.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Rouran   (348 words)

  
 Juan Juan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Juan Juan (wg), Ruanruan (py), Ru Ru (py) or Rouran 柔然; (py) was the name of a confederacy of nomadic tribes on the northern borders of China proper from late 4th century until late 6th century.
The term Rouran (柔然;) was a Chinese language transciption of the pronunciation of the name the confedarcy used to refer to itself.
The Chinese Northern Wei Dynasty, for instance, had established six major garrisons bordering the Juan Juan, which later became the foci of native Xianbei upraising against sinicized Xianbei in early 6th century.
bopedia.com /en/wikipedia/j/ju/juan_juan.html   (335 words)

  
 Rouran - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
After a marriage proposal to the Rouran was rebuffed, the Tujue joined with the Western Wei, successor state to the Northern Wei, and revolted against the Rouran.
Though they admitted the Ashina of Gokturks into their federation, the power of the Rouran was broken by an alliance of Gokturks, the Chinese Northern Qi and Northern Zhou dynasties and tribes in Central Asia in 552.
The Northern Wei, for instance, had established the Six Garrisons of Ordos bordering the Rouran, which later became the foci of native peoples uprising against sinicised peoples in the early 6th century.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Rouran   (571 words)

  
 Kou Qianzhi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
His influence was such that he had Taoism established as the official state religion of the Northern Wei dynasty (386–534); this act, however, embroiled Taoism in long and often bloody factional political struggles.
In 423 Kou had the title of tianshi conferred upon himself by Imperial decree, thereby establishing the “Taoist papacy”: the title was passed to the church's leader from generation to generation in an unbroken line.
By conspiring with certain court officials, Kou's patron Cui Hao was able to have Buddhism, Taoism's chief competitor, proscribed from the realm and all its practitioners subjected to a bloody persecution.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/K'ou_Ch'ien-chih   (355 words)

  
 History of Chinese Religion - ReligionFacts
A network of highways was built for the emperor's troops, and several hundred thousand workers were enlisted to connect and strengthen the walls on the northern border of China.
Emperor Wu-ti's desire for immortality for himself and deceased loved ones led him to employ a number of intermediaries who claimed to be able to make contact with the world of the immortals.
The later part of this period was marked by the destruction of Shu by Wei (263), the overthrow of Wei by the Jin Dynasty (265), and the destruction of Wu by Jin (280).
www.religionfacts.com /chinese_religion/history.htm   (3954 words)

  
 All Information of Puthupally   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Princess Tuoba (拓拔王后, personal name unknown), also known by her Northern Wei title Princess Wuwei (武威公主), was the daughter of Emperor Mingyuan of Northern Wei and who later was a princess of the History of China / Xiongnu state Northern Liang.
It is not known when she was created Princess Wuwei, either by her father or by her brother Emperor Taiwu of Northern Wei, but in a move to ensure Juqu Mujian's loyalty, Emperor Taiwu married her to Juqu Mujian in 437, forcing Juqu Mujian to divorce his prior wife, Princess Li Jingshou.
Emperor Taiwu, hearing that his sister had been poisoned, sent a number of doctors to the Northern Liang capital Guzang (姑臧, in modern Wuwei, Gansu), and they were able to save her.
en_nine.tonight.en.xvip.org   (2881 words)

  
 China Excursions :: Travel to or Tour around China with our help
Though the unified reign of the Qin (秦) Emperor lasted only twelve years, he managed to subdue great parts of what constitutes the core of the Han Chinese homeland and to unite them under a tightly centralized Legalist government seated at Xianyang (in modern Xi'an).
Emperor Guangwu reinstated the Han Dynasty with the support of land-holding and merchant families at Luoyang, east of Xi'an; hence the new era is termed the Eastern Han Dynasty (東漢朝).
Though these three kingdoms were reunited temporarily in 280 by the (Western) Jin Dynasty (晉朝), the contemporary non-Han Chinese (Wu Hu) ethnic groups ravaged the country in the early 4th century and provoked large-scale Han Chinese migrations to south of the Yangtze River.
www.chinaexcursions.com /mod-subjects-printpage-pageid-105-scope-all.html   (5929 words)

  
 china-history   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
China is one of the world's oldest continuous major civilizations, with written records dating back about 3,500 years and with 5,000 years being commonly used by Chinese as the age of their civilization.
Emperor Guangwu of Han China reinstated the Han dynasty with the support of land-holding and merchant families at Luoyang, east of Xian; hence the new era is termed the Eastern Han Dynasty (
The 2nd Sui Emperor was the exactly opposite of his father, excessive and brutal in his spending and power.
www.china-101.net /directory/chinahistory.html   (6067 words)

  
 How did China get so big? - Asia Finest Discussion Forum
Emperor Wu (Han Wudi 漢武帝) consolidated and extended the Chinese empire by pushing back the Xiongnu (匈奴)(sometimes identified with the Huns) into the steppes of modern Inner Mongolia (內蒙古), wresting from them the modern areas of Gansu (甘肅;), Ningxia (寧夏) and Qinghai (青海).
In a strict academic sense it refers to the period between the foundation of the Wei in 220 and the conquest of the Wu by the Jin Dynasty in 280.
The emperor's role became more autocratic, although Zhu Yuanzhang necessarily continued to use what he called the "Grand Secretaries" to assist with the immense paperwork of the bureaucracy, including memorials (petitions and recommendations to the throne), imperial edicts in reply, reports of various kinds, and tax records.
www.asiafinest.com /forum/index.php?act=findpost&pid=1588939   (5861 words)

  
 female individual and the empire: A historicist approach to Mulan and Kingston's woman warrior, The Comparative ...
Wei's poem reproduces the tale of Mulan but with significant modifications.
Wei's version omits that detail, probably because Wei deemed it inappropriate to offer a woman a share in political power.
Furthermore, whereas in the original narrative Mulan maintains an individual voice, which alternates between third-person and first-person perspectives, in Wei's poem, the "I" is completely replaced by a third-person narrator speaking on behalf of a dominating, impersonal, moral authority.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_qa3612/is_200307/ai_n9297242/pg_4   (616 words)

  
 China dgun.org   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
They were all unified under one emperor in 221 BC by Qin Shi Huang, ushering in the Qin Dynasty, the first unified centralized Chinese state.
Ci Xi, 1949.]] In 1912, after a prolonged period of decline, the institution of the Emperor of China disappeared and the Republic of China was established.
However the emperor had ultimate, supreme, and unquestionable authority as the political and religious leader of China.
www.dgun.org /en/China   (11402 words)

  
 Grottos on Maiji Mountain
After the death of Yi Fu, the Queen of Emperor Wendi of the Western Wei Dynasty (535-557), she was buried the niches carved on the Maiji cliff.
During the reign of the Baoding and Tianhe in the Northern Zhou Dynasty (557-581), Li Yunxin, the command-in-chief of the Qin Prefecture, built the Pavilions of Seven Buddha for his deceased father.
The Nivara Cave was completed in the last years of the Northern Wei Dynasty and regarded as the gem of the grotto buildings.
www.chinaculture.org /gb/en_travel/2003-09/24/content_34799.htm   (834 words)

  
 China History Forum, chinese history forum > The three Chinese emperors who banned Buddhism
Tuoba Tao of the Northern Wei unified all of north China and came rather close to capturing the Liu-Song capital too; Yuwen Yong of the Northern Zhou established a military system with which he conquered the Northern Qi.
From the late Age of Fragmentation to the late Tang, it was actually the norm for large monasteries to have serfs and tenants to farm their land, although these would usually not be monks themselves.
The Sangha households and Buddha households were probably established around 469, the former with the populations of two cities in Shandong captured from the Liu-Song (now resettled in Pingcheng), and the latter with pardoned convicts and government slaves.
www.chinahistoryforum.com /lofiversion/index.php/t8001.html   (3087 words)

  
 Download Info of - China   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
They were all unified under one Emperor of China in 221 BC by Qin Shi Huang, ushering in the Qin Dynasty, the first unified centralized Chinese state.
In 1912, after a prolonged period of decline, the institution of the Emperor of China disappeared and the Republic of China was established.
However the Emperor of China had ultimate, supreme, and unquestionable authority as the political and religious leader of China.
www.cwap.org /en/China   (6406 words)

  
 LA NUEVA CUBA
Emperor Taiwu [28] of the Northern Wei Dynasty (386-534 AD) and Emperor Wuzong [29] of the Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD) both tried to extinguish Buddhism in order to have Taoism prevail.
Emperor Shizong [31] of the Later Zhou Dynasty (951-960 AD) tried to extinguish Buddhism merely to use the Buddha statues to mint coins, and did not touch Taoism or Confucianism.
Never in history had any emperor eradicated from people’s minds what they considered to be the most beautiful and the most sacred, using slanderous and insulting propaganda in addition to violence, as the CCP has.
www.lanuevacuba.com /nuevacuba/notic-05-12-1293.htm   (12414 words)

  
 Washington China Review   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
If the emperor is immoral—unenlightened to the Tao, people may rise up to overthrow him, such as in the Chengtang’s attack of Jie, or King Wu’s removal of Zhou.
It was built during the Taiyan time period of the Northern Wei Dynasty 1600 years ago and had precious statues and frescos.
While the emperors in Chinese history used violence on the people, the CCP has gone much further by demonizing and repudiating what people consider to be the most beautiful and the most sacred.
www.washingtonchinareview.org /newsdetail.php?id=2238   (11358 words)

  
 Rouran - China-related Topics RM-RP - China-Related Topics
Because one of their member tribes, the Hua (who they placed, at the head of the Uighurs in 460), later appeared in Europe as the Eurasian Avars, the gross oversimplification that they were synonymous with the Avars has become widespread.
Though they admitted the Asena into their federation, the power of the Rouran was broken by an alliance of Gokturks, the Chinese Northern Qi and Northern Zhou dynasties and tribes in Central Asia in 560s.
The Chinese Northern Wei Dynasty, for instance, had established Six Garrisonssix major garrisons bordering the Rouran, which later became the foci of native peoples uprising against sinicizationsinicized peoples in early 6th century.
www.famouschinese.com /virtual/Rouran   (357 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Northern Wei Dynasty   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
The Northern Wei Dynasty (北魏 386-534) is most noted for the unification of northern China in 440, it was also heavily involved in funding the arts and many antiques and art works from this period have survived.
In 493 AD the dynasty moved its capital from Datong to Luoyang and started the construction of the artificial Longmen Caves.
Images, some of which are used under the doctrine of Fair use or used with permission, may not be available.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Northern_Wei_Dynasty   (282 words)

  
 The Epoch Times | Epoch Times Commentaries on the Chinese Communist Party — Part 6
In fact, Emperor Huang was also credited with developing Taoism—which was also called the Huang-Lao (Lao Zi) school of thought.
Scholastic officials may become teachers for their sage kings, and the behavior of the emperor was constrained by the Confucian classics.
If the emperor is immoral—unenlightened to the Tao, people may rise up to overthrow him, such as in the Tang’s attack of Jie, or King Wu’s removal of Zhou.
www.theepochtimes.com /news/4-12-19/25087.html   (11181 words)

  
 Northern Wei Dynasty - China-related Topics NM-NP - China-Related Topics
Towards the end of the dynasty there was signicant internal dissidence resulting in a split into Eastern and Western Wei.
King of Nan'an of Northern Wei China南安王 nan2 an1 wang2
King of Anding of Northern Wei China安定王 an1 ding4 wang2 or Chu Di出帝 chu1 di4
www.famouschinese.com /virtual/Northern_Wei_Dynasty   (454 words)

  
 China   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
[edit] Qin Dynasty: The First Chinese Empire Though the unified reign of the Qin Emperor lasted only twelve years, he managed to subdue great parts of what constitutes the core of the Han Chinese homeland and to unite them under a tightly centralized Legalist government seated at Xianyang (in modern Xi'an).
However, the Tang dynasty declined in the end, eventually succumbing to the ambitions of warlords; another time of political chaos followed, the Five dynasties and the Ten kingdoms.
[edit] Song Dynasty and its northern neighbors, the Liao and the Jin In 960, the Song Dynasty (960-1279) gained power over most of China and established its capital in Kaifeng, establishing a period of economic prosperity, while the Khitan Liao Dynasty ruled over Manchuria and eastern Mongolia.
www.xishuangbanna.org /chinesehistory   (3839 words)

  
 BookRags: Taiping Summary
Ten times in Chinese history Taiping was chosen as the name of a reign period (nianhao).
Emperor Taiwu of the Northern Wei called both himself and a period of his reign (440–452) "Perfect Lord of Great Peace."
In 1851, the visionary rebel leader Hong Xiuquan (1813–1864) from Canton proclaimed the Heavenly Kingdom of Great Peace (Taiping Tianguo) with himself as Emperor of Great Peace (Taiping Tianzi).
www.bookrags.com /research/taiping-eorl-13   (905 words)

  
 The three Chinese emperors who banned Buddhism - China History Forum, chinese history forum   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
China History Forum is an online chinese history forum, discussion board or community for all who are interested in learning and discussing chinese history from prehistoric till modern times, including chinese art of war, chinese culture topics.
Many Chinese will have heard of the 'Three Wu' - Emperor Taiwu of the Northern Wei (Tuoba Tao), Emperor Wu of the Northern Zhou (Yuwen Yong), and Emperor Wuzong of the Tang (Li Yan), who were the only ones in Chinese history to proscribe and persecute Buddhism.
The dead have passed beyond our power to honour or dishonour them, but not beyond our ability to try and understand.
www.chinahistoryforum.com /index.php?showtopic=8001&mode=threaded   (973 words)

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