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Topic: English Civil War


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www.civilwarthings.com   (131 words)

  
 War Times
The only way to end the civil war in Iraq is for the different groups of Iraqis to negotiate a solution.
Furthermore, extremist groups who actually do want civil war have very little support among the Iraqi people and are only tolerated because they are attacking occupation forces.
The US military’s main goal is destroying the mostly Sunni resistance, not preventing a civil war.
www.war-times.org   (801 words)

  
  English Civil War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The English Civil War was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations which took place between Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1651.
The first (1642 - 1645) and second (1648 - 1649) civil wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third war of (1649 - 1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament.
The third war ended with the Parliamentary victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/English_Civil_War   (5053 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: First English Civil War
"The English Civil War" (1642–51), is a generic name for the civil wars in England and the Scottish Civil War, which began with the raising of Charles I's standard at Nottingham on August 22, 1642, and ended at the Battle of Worcester fought on September 3, 1651.
The wars inextricably mingled with and formed part of a linked series of conflicts and civil wars between 1639 and 1651 in the kingdoms of England, Scotland and Ireland, which at that time shared a monarch but formed distinct countries with otherwise separate political structures.
The wars led to the trial and execution of Charles I, the exile of his son Charles II, and the replacement of the English monarchy with the Commonwealth of England (1649 – 1653) and then with a Protectorate (1653 – 1659): the personal rule of Oliver Cromwell.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/First_English_Civil_War/Fairfax.27s_Western_Campaign   (700 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: First English Civil War
The English Civil War was not, as is often portrayed, a war between dashing Cavaliers and sombre Parliamentarians, these are just typecast roles and are as false as modern stereotypes.
Although most historians date the start of the civil war at 22 August, 1642, when the Royal standard was raised at Nottingham, a complete study of the civil war cannot be done without looking at the causes of the English Civil War.
English civil war: The Rise of the Opposition - The Rise of the Opposition Under James I James I was not long in gaining a personal unpopularity...
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/First_English_Civil_War/Cropredy_Bridge   (2308 words)

  
 English Civil War   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The English Civil War was a civil war fought between Charles I king of England Scotland and Ireland and his supporters and the Long Parliament led by Oliver Cromwell.
In the words of Christopher Hill "the Civil War was a class On the side of reaction was the aristocracy and its ally the established church.
Commonwealth and Protectorate: The English Civil War and its aftermath
www.freeglossary.com /English_Civil_War   (3770 words)

  
 English Civil War - MSN Encarta
English Civil War, military conflicts from 1642 to 1646 in England between the armies of Charles I and those of the English Parliament that were influenced by wars that took place at the same time in Ireland and Scotland.
The first major battle of the war at Edgehill, in Warwickshire, on October 23, 1642, fought between royalist and Parliamentarian field armies of around 13-14,000 men each, led by the king and the Earl of Essex respectively, was inconclusive.
The course of the English Civil War is impossible to understand fully unless it is seen as part of a wider War of Three Kingdoms that engulfed the whole of the British Isles.
uk.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761563157/English_Civil_War.html   (4186 words)

  
 English Civil War - Wikipedia
The English Civil War that broke out on August 27, 1642 and continued until approximately 1650 is often simply referred to in Britain as the "civil war", sometimes leading to confusion with the American Civil War.
There were two other periods of major civil war after the Norman Conquest: "the Anarchy," which occurred during the 12th century reign of King Stephen, and the Wars of the Roses, which lasted for much of the 15th century.
The English Parliament, having controverted the king's authority, raised an army led by Robert Devereux, 3rd Earl of Essex.
wikipedia.findthelinks.com /en/English_Civil_War.html   (2184 words)

  
 English Civil War at AllExperts
The first (1642 - 1645) and second (1648 - 1649) civil wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third war of (1649 - 1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament.
The third war ended with the Parliamentary victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.
Similarily the same term is commonly used even though the civil wars of that period involved both Scotland and Ireland; see Wars of the Three Kingdoms for clarification.
en.allexperts.com /e/e/en/english_civil_war.htm   (5071 words)

  
 English Civil War - Medbib.com, the modern encyclopedia
The Civil War ended with the Parliamentary victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.
The Civil War led to the trial and execution of Charles I, the exile of his son Charles II, and the replacement of the English monarchy with first the Commonwealth of England (1649 - 1653) and then with a Protectorate (1653 - 1659), under the personal rule of Oliver Cromwell.
Constitutionally, the wars established a precedent that British monarchs could not govern without the consent of Parliament, although this would not be cemented until the Glorious Revolution later in the century.
www.medbib.com /English_Civil_War   (6912 words)

  
 English civil war. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The ominous peace was broken by troubles in Scotland, where efforts to enforce Anglican episcopal policy led to the violent opposition of the Covenanters and to war in 1639 (see Bishops’ Wars) and compelled Charles to seek the financial aid of Parliament.
The disasters of the second Scottish war compelled a virtual surrender by the king to the opposition, and the Long Parliament was summoned (Nov., 1640).
Although some of the changes brought about by the war were swept away (e.g., in the restoration of Anglicanism as the state church), the settlement of the contest between the king and Parliament was permanently assured in the Glorious Revolution of 1688.
www.bartleby.com /65/en/EnglshCW.html   (2321 words)

  
 Lecture 7: The English Civil War
The English Civil War was as much the response to the effects of the Reformation as it was a response to the needs of the rising middle classes, the landed gentry.
The war itself involved the king, Parliament, the aristocracy, the middle classes, the commoners, and the army.
The existence of the gentry in the early 17th century was not enough to stimulate a civil war.
www.historyguide.org /earlymod/lecture7c.html   (3713 words)

  
 English Civil War
The first (1642–1645) and the second (1648–1649) civil wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament.
The third war ended with the Parliamentary victory at the Battle of Worcester on September 3, 1651.
The wars led to the trial and execution of Charles I, the exile of his son Charles II, and the replacement of the English monarchy with the Commonwealth of England (1649–1653) and then with a Protectorate (1653–1659): the personal rule of Oliver Cromwell.
www.tagate.com /wars/page/english.shtml   (2109 words)

  
 English Civil War   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
While the monarchy was subsequently restored, the civil wars effectively set England and Scotland on course to become a parliamentary democracy and after the acts of union help United Kingdom avoid the later European republican movements that followed the Jacobin revolution in 18th century France and the later success of Napoleon.
In the words of Christopher Hill, "the Civil War was a class war." On the side of reaction was the landed aristocracy and its ally, the established church.
For example, the wars were caused by Charles I trying to impose an Anglican prayer book on Scotland; when they resisted he declared war on them, but had to raise heavy taxes in England to pay for it, which triggered off the Civil war in England.
www.info-pedia.net /about/english_civil_war   (4652 words)

  
 Castles and the Civil War   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Castles of Wales and the Civil War
When the Civil War broke out between the king and Parliament in 1642 Wales was almost wholly royalist, and a number of castles were garrisoned in Charles I's cause.
Conwy was renovated and refortified during 1642-43 by John Williams, archbishop of York, and was held for the king throughout the first Civil War.
www.castlewales.com /civilwar.html   (383 words)

  
 English Civil War Summary
The English Civil War was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations which took place between Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1651.
Argument that economic greed was the cause of the English Civil War.
English Civil War: Charles I in 1631, by Daniel Mytens.
www.bookrags.com /English_Civil_War   (300 words)

  
 Book review: The English Civil War 1642-1651
In his preface Haythornthwaite points out that a purely military history of the English Civil War would result in a distorted view since the political, religious and social influences were so significant.
The first is a general introduction to the war and its causes, the next two are the obligatory 'armies and organisation' chapters which give necessary information as to the creation, presentation and equipping of the opposing armies.
These chapters give a fairly detailed run through of the war, with descriptions of strategy and deployment, how the result was viewed by the opposing sides and what their options were.
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/wargaming/65501   (478 words)

  
 English Civil War
English civil war uniform prints of parliamentarian and cavalier troops, Oliver Cromwell, Charles 1st and 2nd, and battle scenes at Marston Moor, Naseby, Worcester, Edgehill and Dunbar.
The destruction caused by the English Civil Wars was widespread and devastating.
This book is the first detailed study of this aspect of the Civil Wars and makes available the results of many years of study and research of original documents and manuscripts in record offices and local history libraries throughout the country.
www.civilwarartprints.com /english_civil_war.htm   (1472 words)

  
 The Civil War
The English Civil War was a conflict between King Charles I and his Parliament.
The war was bloody and many people were killed in the battles.
Soon after the war was over, and it had stopped and started several times, the King was put on trial.
www.schoolshistory.org.uk /civilwar.htm   (233 words)

  
 English Civil War
The English Civil War is a military history dealing with the operational aspects of these wars, and is based on an absorbing combination of original sources and extensive studies of the actual battlefields - battles such as Edgehill, Cropredy, Lostwithiel, Marston Moor and Naseby.
In August 1644, at the height of the English Civil War, James Graham, Marquis of Montrose, raised the standard of Royalist rebellion in Scotland.
The origins of the war and the course of the cmapaings are here comprehensively but succinctly described by Dr Maurice Ashley, a leading authority on seventeenth-century England, who bases his narrative on the latest academic research and on the analysis by military experts of such important battles as those of Marston Moor and Naseby.
www.militaryshop.co.uk /english_civil_war1.htm   (2484 words)

  
 First English Civil War, 1642-6
The inevitable crisis was caused by Charles's attempts to impose the English liturgy in Scotland.
Although the civil war split all levels of society, some generalisations about the support for each side can be made.
The English Civil War, Richard Holmes & Peter Young, an early work by one of the countries best known military historians, this is a superb single volume history of the war, from it's causing to the last campaigns of the war and on to the end of the protectorate.
www.historyofwar.org /articles/wars_ecw1.html   (1226 words)

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