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Topic: Enrico Fermi


  
  Enrico Fermi
Fermi became a professor of physics at the University of Rome in 1926.
Enrico Fermi (September 29, 1901 –; November 28, 1954) was an Italian-born physicist of United States citizenship most noted for his work on beta decay, the development of the first nuclear reactor, and for the development of quantum theory.
Fermi found, in New York and Chicago, the environment and technology that he needed to advance and prove his theories.
www.lycos.com /info/enrico-fermi.html   (518 words)

  
  Enrico Fermi - Printer-friendly - MSN Encarta
The method that Fermi developed became known as Fermi statistics, and the particles that obey the Pauli exclusion principle became known as fermions.
Fermi discovered that shooting neutrons through paraffin wax at a sample of atoms slowed the neutrons down and increased the intensity of the radioactivity.
Fermi eventually returned to the University of Chicago and continued to research radioactivity and neutrons.
encarta.msn.com /text_761578253___3/Enrico_Fermi.html   (770 words)

  
  Fermi, Enrico - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Fermi, Enrico   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Fermi built the first nuclear reactor in 1942 at Chicago University and later took part in the Manhattan Project to construct an atom bomb.
Fermi's experimental work on beta decay in radioactive materials provided further evidence for the existence of the neutrino, predicted by Austrian physicist Wolfgang Pauli.
Fermi was born in Rome and studied at Pisa; Göttingen, Germany; and Leiden, the Netherlands.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Fermi,+Enrico   (598 words)

  
 Enrico Fermi - MSN Encarta
Fermi was the first scientist to split an atom, although he misinterpreted his results for several years.
Fermi studied with German physicist Max Born in Göttingen, Germany, from 1922 to 1924.
Fermi became a professor at Columbia University in New York in 1939, and in 1941 moved to Chicago, Illinois, for a professorship at the University of Chicago.
encarta.msn.com /encnet/refpages/refarticle.aspx?refid=761578253   (1143 words)

  
 Enrico Fermi Encyclopedia Article @ AlienArtifacts.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Enrico Fermi (Rome, September 29, 1901 – Chicago, November 28, 1954) was an Italian physicist most noted for his work on beta decay, the development of the first nuclear reactor, and for the development of quantum theory.
In 1938, Fermi won the Nobel Prize in Physics for his "demonstrations of the existence of new radioactive elements produced by neutron irradiation, and for his related discovery of nuclear reactions brought about by slow neutrons".
On November 28, 1954, Fermi died at the age of 53 of stomach cancer in Chicago, Illinois and was interred there in Oak Woods Cemetery.
www.alienartifacts.com /encyclopedia/Enrico_Fermi   (1413 words)

  
 The My Hero Project - Enrico Fermi
Enrico Fermi is viewed as one of the last physicists who was actually able to bridge the gap between theoretical knowledge and experimental application.
Fermi realized at this point that someone might be able to create a stable chain reaction using the same principles and potentially generate an enormous amount of energy, either in the form of electricity, or a bomb.
Enrico Fermi was one of the 20th century's greatest physicists.
www.myhero.com /myhero/hero.asp?hero=Fermi_Fredericksberg_05   (1882 words)

  
 Enrico Fermi   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Enrico Fermi was born in the city of Rome in 1902.
Fermi lectured in mathematical physics and mechanics at the University of Florence from 1924 to 1926.
In 1938, Fermi was honored with the Nobel Prize "for his identification of new radioactive elements produced by neutron bombardment and his discovery, made in connection with this work, of nuclear reactions effected by slow neutrons." He traveled to Stockholm to receive this award.
www.newton.mec.edu /brown/te/INVENTORS/INVENTORS/byKIDS/lazewatsky.html   (174 words)

  
 Fermi, Enrico
Fermi was the youngest of the three children of Alberto Fermi, a railroad employee, and Ida de Gattis.
Fermi's colleagues were inclined to believe that he had actually made a new, "transuranic" element of atomic number 93; that is, during bombardment, the nucleus of uranium had captured a neutron, thus increasing its atomic weight.
Fermi did not make this claim, for he was not certain what had occurred; indeed, he was unaware that he was on the edge of a world-shaking discovery.
www.britannica.com /nobel/micro/206_82.html   (1415 words)

  
 Enrico Fermi at AllExperts
Enrico Fermi (September 29, 1901–November 28, 1954) was an Italian physicist most noted for his work on beta decay, the development of the first nuclear reactor, and for the development of quantum theory.
Fermi's interest in physics was further encouraged when a friend of his father's gave him several books on physics and mathematics, which he read and assimilated.
Fermi moved to Los Alamos in the later stages of the Manhattan Project to serve as a general consultant.
en.allexperts.com /e/e/en/enrico_fermi.htm   (2069 words)

  
 Enrico Fermi Biography
Enrico Fermi (September 29 1901 – 29 November 1954) was an Italian-American physicist most noted for his work on beta decay the development of the first nuclear reactor and for the development of quantum theory.
Fermi is known as the originator of the Fermi paradox in SETI research when in a discussion of the possibility that intelligent aliens might exist he famously asked "Where are they?"
Fermi problems such as the classic "How many piano tuners are there in Chicago?" are named after Fermi's use of such estimation problems to teach students the importance of dimensional analysis approximation methods and clear identification of assumptions.
www.ebiog.com /biography/3261/enrico-fermi/bio.htm   (1065 words)

  
 Enrico Fermi Biography (Physicist) — FactMonster.com
Fermi became a professor of physics at the University of Rome in 1926.
Fermi worked in the physics department of Columbia University (1939-42) before being assigned as one of the directors of the Manhattan Project with J.
Enrico Fermi - Enrico Fermi Born: 1901 Birthplace: Rome, Italy Neutronic reactor—Fermi was awarded the 1938...
www.factmonster.com /biography/var/enricofermi.html   (447 words)

  
 Enrico Fermi Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
Fermi was born on Sept. 29, 1901, in Rome, the third child of an official in the Ministry of Railroads.
Fermi worked out in a short time an elegant theory of beta decay based on the idea that a neutron in the nucleus is transformed (decays) into three particles: a proton, an electron (beta particle), and a neutrino.
Fermi's hypothesis for this miracle, which he immediately confirmed, was that in passing through the paraffin, a compound containing a large amount of hydrogen, the neutrons had their velocity much reduced by collisions with the hydrogen nuclei; and these very slow neutrons--contrary to all expectations--induced a much higher radioactivity in substances than did fast neutrons.
www.bookrags.com /biography/enrico-fermi   (1475 words)

  
 Enrico Fermi | Physicist
Fermi settled in the United States in 1939, and became professor of physics at Columbia University in New York City.
Fermi was placed in charge of the Manhattan Project at the University of Chicago in 1942.
Laura Fermi traces her husband's career from his childhood, when he taught himself physics, through his rise in the Italian university system concurrent with the rise of fascism, to his receipt of the Nobel Prize, which offered a perfect opportunity to flee the country without arousing official suspicion, and his odyssey to the United States.
www.lucidcafe.com /library/95sep/fermi.html   (652 words)

  
 Nuclear Files: Library: Biographies: Enrico Fermi
Often referred to as the "architect of the nuclear age," Enrico Fermi was born on September 29, 1901 in Rome, Italy.
Fermi left the University of Florence to become a professor of theoretical physics at the University of Rome.
Fermi moved to the University of Chicago in 1942 where he developed the first atomic pile and produced the first nuclear chain reaction.
www.nuclearfiles.org /menu/library/biographies/bio_fermi-enrico.htm   (241 words)

  
 Enrico Fermi - Biography
Enrico Fermi was born in Rome on 29th September, 1901, the son of Alberto Fermi, a Chief Inspector of the Ministry of Communications, and Ida de Gattis.
In 1927, Fermi was elected Professor of Theoretical Physics at the University of Rome (a post which he retained until 1938, when he - immediately after the receipt of the Nobel Prize - emigrated to America, primarily to escape Mussolini's fascist dictatorship).
Fermi was member of several academies and learned societies in Italy and abroad (he was early in his career, in 1929, chosen among the first 30 members of the Royal Academy of Italy).
www.nobel.se /physics/laureates/1938/fermi-bio.html   (975 words)

  
 Enrico Fermi Biography | World of Scientific Discovery
Fermi was born in Rome, Italy, on September 29, 1901.
Fermi entered the University of Pisa at the age of seventeen and received his Ph.D. in 1922.
Fermi reached the United States at about the time that the discovery of nuclear fission was announced.
www.bookrags.com /biography/enrico-fermi-wsd   (913 words)

  
 Fermi, Enrico on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
FERMI, ENRICO [Fermi, Enrico], 1901-54, American physicist, b.
Fermi's wife, Laura, was Jewish, and the family did not return to Fascist Italy after the journey to Stockholm to receive the Nobel award, but continued on to the United States.
Fermi was professor of physics at Columbia Univ. (1939-45) and at the Univ. of Chicago (1946-54).
www.encyclopedia.com /html/F/Fermi-E1n.asp   (491 words)

  
 Enrico Fermi and the First Self-Sustaining Nuclear Chain Reaction
Enrico Fermi was born in Rome, Italy, on September 29, 1901.
Fermi's accomplishments were in both theoretical and experimental physics, a unique feat in an age in which scientific endeavors have tended to specialize on one aspect or the other.
Fermi's momentous accomplishments caused him to be recognized as one of the great scientists of the 20th century.
www.osti.gov /accomplishments/fermi.html   (1065 words)

  
 TIME 100: Enrico Fermi
Enrico Fermi in 1946 at the University of Chicago
Enrico Fermi, a supremely self-assured Italian American born in Rome in 1901, was the last great physicist to bridge the gap.
A dark, compact man with mischievous gray-blue eyes, Fermi was the son of a civil servant, an administrator with the Italian national railroad.
www.time.com /time/time100/scientist/profile/fermi.html   (374 words)

  
 The Enrico Fermi Award
The Enrico Fermi Award is a Presidential award, one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology awards given by the U.S. Government.
President Eisenhower and the Atomic Energy Commission honored Enrico Fermi with a special award for his lifetime of accomplishments in physics and, in particular, for the development of atomic energy on November 16, 1954, 12 days before the Italian-born naturalized American citizen died of cancer at the age of 53.
A Fermi Award winner receives a citation signed by the President of the United States and the Secretary of Energy, a gold medal bearing the likeness of Enrico Fermi, and a $375,000 honorarium.
www.sc.doe.gov /fermi   (332 words)

  
 The Enrico Fermi Award
The Enrico Fermi Award is a Presidential award, one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology awards given by the U.S. Government.
President Eisenhower and the Atomic Energy Commission honored Enrico Fermi with a special award for his lifetime of accomplishments in physics and, in particular, for the development of atomic energy on November 16, 1954, 12 days before the Italian-born naturalized American citizen died of cancer at the age of 53.
A Fermi Award winner receives a citation signed by the President of the United States and the Secretary of Energy, a gold medal bearing the likeness of Enrico Fermi, and a $375,000 honorarium.
www.er.doe.gov /fermi   (332 words)

  
 Enrico Fermi | Biography | atomicarchive.com
Enrico Fermi was born on September 29, 1901, in Rome, Italy.
The next year, Fermi was elected Professor of Theoretical Physics at the University of Rome, a post that he retained until 1938 when he emigrated to America, primarily to escape Mussolini's fascist dictatorship.
Fermi was also awarded the 1938 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his demonstrations of the existence of new radioactive elements produced by neutron irradiation, and for his related discovery of nuclear reactions brought about by slow neutrons."
www.atomicarchive.com /Bios/Fermi.shtml   (517 words)

  
 Malaspina Great Books - Enrico Fermi (1901-1954)
The son of a railroad official, Fermi studied at the University of Pisa from 1918 to 1922 and later at the universities of Leyden and Gottingen.
Fermi's accomplishments were in both theoretical and experimental physics, a unique feat in an age in which scientific endeavors have tended to specialize on one aspect or the other.
Fermi is recognized among physicists as one of the great scientists of the 20th century.
www.malaspina.org /home.asp?topic=./search/details&lastpage=./search/results&ID=376   (803 words)

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