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Topic: Epistle of Jude


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  The General Epistle Of Jude - LoveToKnow 1911
The Greek of Jude is also such as to exclude the idea of authorship in Palestine by an unschooled Galilean, at an early date in church history.
On the other hand, practically the whole of Jude is taken up into 2 Pet., the author merely avoiding, so far as he discovers them, the quotations from apocryphal writings, and prefixing and affixing sections of his own to refute the heretical eschatology.
The history of the reception of the epistle into church canons is similar to that of James, beginning with a quotation of it as the work of Jude by Clement of Alexandria (Paed.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /The_General_Epistle_Of_Jude   (1540 words)

  
  Epistle of Jude - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The epistle is titled as written by "Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and a brother of James" (NIV), although that authorship is doubted by many scholars.
As opinions and traditions within the Christian community still differ as to the identity of Jude or Judas, the brother of Jesus and James, the issues of the apostle's identity are discussed at Jude Thomas.
The epistle is addressed to Christians in general (1:1), and it seeks to put them on their guard against the misleading efforts of certain teachers of error to whom they were being exposed.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Epistle_of_Jude   (536 words)

  
 Clarke's Commentary - Jude 1   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
The reasons which induced Jude to write this epistle, to excite the Christians to contend for the true faith, and to beware of false teachers, lest, falling from their steadfastness, they should be destroyed after the example of backsliding Israel, the apostate angels, and the inhabitants of Sodom and Gomorrha, 3-7.
Jude, the servant of Jesus Christ] Probably Jude the apostle, who was surnamed Thaddeus and Lebbeus, was son to Alpheus, and brother to James the less, Joses, and Simon.
The Epistle of Jude the son of Joseph, and brother of James, is ended-A MS.
www.godrules.net /library/clarke/clarkejude1.htm   (5716 words)

  
 The Epistle of Jude   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
This little epistle of twenty-two verses and less than seven hundred words is replete with the most solemn warnings and the loftiest spiritual lessons, conveyed with a vigor and vividness worthy of comparison with some of the finest visions of the old prophets, such as Jeremiah, Hosea, and Zephaniah.
The epistle is addressed "to them that are sanctified by God the Father, and preserved in Jesus Christ, and called." If this language be too strong to apply to all Christians literally, it is well to remember that the Lord assumes that all the disciples of Christ are living up to their true standard.
Jude next proceeds to emphasize his warnings against these teachers by a threefold reference to God's judgments in the past, against those guilty of such errors and crimes.
glorifyhisname.com /sys-tmpl/cibjude   (2775 words)

  
 USCCB - NAB - Jude
The person intended is almost certainly the other Jude, named in the gospels among the relatives of Jesus (Matthew 13:55; Mark 6:3), and the James who is listed there as his brother is the one to whom the Letter of James is attributed (see the Introduction to James).
Nothing else is known of this Jude, and the apparent need to identify him by reference to his better-known brother indicates that he was a rather obscure personage in the early church.
Most scholars believe that Jude is the earlier of the two, principally because he quotes two apocryphal Jewish works, the Assumption of Moses (Jude 1:9) and the Book of Enoch (Jude 1:14-15) as part of his structured argument, whereas 2 Peter omits both references.
www.usccb.org /nab/bible/jude/jude.htm   (1846 words)

  
 Jude, an outline
The Epistle of Jude is the last of the general letters of the New Testament and the next to the last book of the Bible.
Jude is a brief but hard-hitting epistle written by a man who believed in not allowing negative influences to destroy the church.
Jude writes as a defender of the faith who is "contending earnestly for the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints (v.
www.ovrlnd.com /outlinesofbooks/Jude.html   (653 words)

  
 Bible Notes - Jude
Jude 3,4 Apparently Jude momentarily abandons the composition of another letter that he had been writing, that is, he wanted to write to those Christians, to alert them about the false teachers who had infiltrated the Church.
Jude used this story from the apocryphal Assumption of Moses to demonstrate a proper attitude toward the supernatural.
Jude was not necessarily viewing I Enoch as inspired, but he was referring to a book his readers would know and respect.
www.angelfire.com /sc3/redentormio/Judep1.html   (1529 words)

  
 Jude: Christian Resource Centre (Bermuda)!
The epistle provides no direct information as to the circumstances under which it was written or as to the believers to whom it was addressed.
This similarity suggests that the Epistle of Jude was written as a warning against the same heretical tendencies--the proto-Gnosticism of Cerinthus and the Docetists.
Jude had originally intended to write an epistle on the general subject of salvation, but learning of the heretical and licentious teachers who were troubling the flock, he decided instead to send a warning against them (Jude 3).
www.nisbett.com /summary/sum-n-20.htm   (615 words)

  
 Epistle of Jude   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
The epistle claims to have been written by "Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and a brother of James" (NIV), although that authorship is doubted by many scholars.
As opinions and traditions within the Christian community still cloud the true identity of Jude or Judas, the brother of Jesus and James, the issues of the apostle's identity are discussed at Jude Thomas.
The epistle is addressed to Christians in general (1:1), and it designs to put them on their guard against the misleading efforts of certain teachers of error, to which they were exposed.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/epistle_of_jude   (571 words)

  
 Domestic-Church.Com: Saint Profile: Simon Zealot Jude Thaddeus
The Epistle of Jude, the shortest book in the New Testament, may have been written by the Apostle Jude, (though verse 17 seems to imply that the apostles of Jesus have already died).
The Epistle of Jude is a short letter, addressed to the Church, and warns against corrupt influences that have crept in.
Jude is often, in popular usage, referred to as the patron of desperate causes, the "saint of last resort," the one you ask for help when all else fails.
www.domestic-church.com /CONTENT.DCC/19980901/SAINTS/STJUDE.HTM   (1763 words)

  
 Epistle of Jude   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
The epistle claims to have been written by "Jude a servant of Jesus Christ and brother of James" (NIV) although that authorship is doubted by scholars.
The fluent Greek style is idiomatic and The epistle is addressed to Christians in (1:1) and it designs to put them their guard against the misleading efforts of teachers of error to which they were Examples of heterodox opinions that were circulating the early 2nd century include Docetism Marcionism and Gnosticism.
Because epistle is much shorter than the pseudepigraphy ascribed to Peter and for various stylistic the scholarly consensus is that this work the source for the similar passages of other.
www.freeglossary.com /Epistle_of_Jude   (735 words)

  
 SAINT JUDE
This James is to be identified with the Bishop of the Church of Jerusalem (Acts, xv, 13; xxi, 18), spoken of by St. Paul as "the brother of the Lord" (Gal.
The resemblance as to thought and language between Jude and II Peter, ii, is quite sufficient to make it certain that one of the two writers borrowed from the other: the hypothesis that both writers borrowed from a common document must be put aside, as having no support whatsoever.
Jude's intention was to caution his readers, the Hebrew Christians, against such depraved teaching, and to exhort them to keep faithfully the teaching of the Apostles.
www.thesacredheart.com /sts/jude.htm   (2478 words)

  
 Jude, Epistle of (WebBible Encyclopedia) - ChristianAnswers.Net
The genuineness of this epistle was early questioned, and doubts regarding it were revived at the time of the Reformation; but the evidences in support of its claims are complete.
The striking resemblance this epistle bears to 2 Peter suggests the idea that the author of the one had seen the epistle of the other.
The doxology with which the epistle concludes is regarded as the finest in the New Testament.
www.christiananswers.net /dictionary/judeepistleof.html   (197 words)

  
 Jude, The Epistle Of (International Standard Bible Encyclopedia) :: Bible Tools
Jude describes himself as "a servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James" (Judges 1:1).
Jude mentions that he is the "brother of James," perhaps to give authority and weight to his words, for James was far more distinguished and influential than he.
Jude asserts with great positiveness that (Judges 1:4) certain men had crept in privily into the Christian fold, "even they who were of old written of beforehand unto this condemnation, ungodly men." Obviously Jude is here speaking of the enemies whom he afterward goes on to describe and denounce in his Epistle.
bibletools.org /index.cfm/fuseaction/Def.show/RTD/ISBE/ID/5206   (4804 words)

  
 The Saint Jude Network
Jude is the brother of the Apostle James the Less.
Jude was beaten to death with a club; hence he is represented with a club in his hand.
Saint Jude is known mainly as the author of the New Testament Epistle of Jude.
www.stjude.net /life_of_st_jude.htm   (2299 words)

  
 Jude, the Epistle of - International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
Jude describes himself as "a servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James" (Jude 1:1).
Jude mentions that he is the "brother of James," perhaps to give authority and weight to his words, for James was far more distinguished and influential than he.
Jude asserts with great positiveness that (1:4) certain men had crept in privily into the Christian fold, "even they who were of old written of beforehand unto this condemnation, ungodly men." Obviously Jude is here speaking of the enemies whom he afterward goes on to describe and denounce in his Epistle.
www.studylight.org /enc/isb/view.cgi?number=T5206   (4897 words)

  
 Epistle of Jude
Jude is writing to a group of people in a church, and notice he doesn’t address this letter to ALL in the assemble, but onto to those who are saved.
Jude 1:3 Beloved, when I gave all diligence to write unto you of the common salvation, it was needful for me to write unto you, and exhort you that ye should earnestly contend for the faith which was once (one time-on one occasion) delivered unto the saints.
Jude 1:15 To execute judgment upon all, and to convince all that are ungodly among them of all their ungodly deeds which they have ungodly committed, and of all their hard speeches which ungodly sinners have spoken against him.
cnview.com /bible_study/epistle_of_jude.htm   (1548 words)

  
 Comments On The Epistle Of Jude :: LM Grant
Jude is "bondsman of Jesus Christ," one totally in the possession of his Master: for though he is an apostle, he does not write as such.
His epistle is general, for he writes to those "beloved in God the Father," that is, all believers, beloved no matter how great the ruin; "preserved by Jesus Christ," for no other power is comparable for this; and called, being the positive subjects of God's counsels of grace.
Jude's exposure of Christendom's corruption is by no means that we should gloat over it, or be discouraged by it, rather this dark background should only serve to bring out more clearly and beautifully the pure, positive, unchanging, truth of the word of God.
www.biblecentre.org /commentaries/lmg_69_jude.htm   (2353 words)

  
 The Epistle Of Jude :: Hamilton Smithy
Jude having taken his pen in hand purposed to write with all diligence concerning the common salvation, but, led by the Spirit of God, he is constrained to write concerning a special evil which made it of all moment that he should exhort the saints to contend earnestly for the faith.
Jude having led us into the fullness of eternal life, takes one look back into the welter of evil, and in the midst of it, and associated with it, he sees many of the people of God.
Jude has exposed the evil in all its horror, and warned, encouraged, and exhorted the saints; but his final resource is God Himself and all that God is for His people.
www.biblecentre.org /commentaries/hs_69_jude.htm   (4554 words)

  
 An Introduction to the New Testament
The epistle claims to be written by Judas ‘a servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James’;.
In view of the shortness of the epistle this widespread use and acceptance as authoritative is remarkable, although there seems also to have been a certain hesitation in later times to accept it, possibly because of its references to apocryphal books.
Jude writes as one whose authority is unquestioned, and as one who can himself remember and vouch for the original content of the gospel, departure from which is fatal.
www.religion-online.org /showchapter.asp?title=531&C=564   (550 words)

  
 USCCB - NAB - Jude
The person intended is almost certainly the other Jude, named in the gospels among the relatives of Jesus (Matthew 13:55; Mark 6:3), and the James who is listed there as his brother is the one to whom the Letter of James is attributed (see the Introduction to James).
Nothing else is known of this Jude, and the apparent need to identify him by reference to his better-known brother indicates that he was a rather obscure personage in the early church.
Most scholars believe that Jude is the earlier of the two, principally because he quotes two apocryphal Jewish works, the Assumption of Moses (Jude 1:9) and the Book of Enoch (Jude 1:14-15) as part of his structured argument, whereas 2 Peter omits both references.
www.nccbuscc.org /nab/bible/jude/jude.htm   (1846 words)

  
 Jude
The Epistle of Jude develops the history of the apostasy of Christendom, from the earliest elements that crept into the assembly to corrupt it, down to its judgment at the appearing of our Lord, but as moral apostasy by turning the grace of God into lasciviousness.
Jude begins by declaring the faithfulness of God and the character of His care for the saints, which answers to the prayer of Jesus in John 17.
That which is peculiarly striking in the Epistle of Jude is that he pursues the corruption of the assembly from the creeping in of some unawares on to its final judgment, shewing withal that it is not arrested but passes through its various phases to that day.
ccel.org /d/darby/synopsis/Jude.html   (1957 words)

  
 EPISTLE OF JAMES - Online Information article about EPISTLE OF JAMES
Jude) be not a later conjecture prefixed by some compiler of the See also:
general epistle, couched in fluent, even rhetorical, Greek, and afterwards the Pauline letters, which both as to origin and subsequent circulation were a product of urgent conditions.
scribe of Jude 1 is of secondary importance.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /INV_JED/JAMES_EPISTLE_OF.html   (3396 words)

  
 [No title]
The Author and the Authenticity of the Epistle: (1) Jude in the Books of the New Testament; (2) Tradition as to the Genuineness and the Canonicity of the Epistle; (3) Difficulties Arising from the Text; (4) The Relation of Jude to the Second Epistle of St. Peter; (5) Vocabulary and Style; II.
The following arguments, however, lead to the conclusion that the Epistle of Jude was the earlier of the two: • It is not uncommon for St. Peter to throw a light on the more obscure passages of the Epistle of Jude, or to interpret the more difficult passages.
Object Jude's intention was to caution his readers, the Hebrew Christians, against such depraved teaching, and to exhort them to keep faithfully the teaching of the Apostles.
www.ewtn.com /library/SCRIPTUR/08542B.TXT   (2464 words)

  
 The Saint Series (Jude)
Apostle and martyr, he is usually identified with Thaddaeus (or Lebbeus), Jude (Judas), the brother of St James the Less, one of the brethren of the Lord and the author of the Epistle of Jude.
Jude is frequently "thanked" in the "personal" sections of the sort of newpapers Our Saint would doubtless have spurned.
Saint Jude was long neglected by the Faithful as an object of veneration because his name is identical to that of the infamous disciple who betrayed Christ and this patronage is said to have originated because nobody invoked him for anything.
www.krayel.com /jude.html   (287 words)

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