Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Epistle to the Colossians


Related Topics

  
  Epistle to the Colossians - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Like some of his other epistles (e.g., those to Corinth), this seems to have been written in consequence of information which had somehow been conveyed to him of the internal state of the church there (1:4-8).
A large part of it is directed against certain speculatists who attempted to combine the doctrines of Oriental mysticism and asceticism with Christianity, thereby promising the disciples the enjoyment of a higher spiritual life and a deeper insight into the world of spirits.
(The apocryphal Epistle to the Laodiceans is almost universally believed to be a forgery based on this instruction.) He then closes this brief but striking epistle with his usual autograph salutation.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Epistle_to_the_Colossians   (585 words)

  
 EPISTLE TO THE COLOSSIANS - LoveToKnow Article on EPISTLE TO THE COLOSSIANS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The letter begins with a thanksgiving to God for the spiritual growth of the Colossians, and continues with a prayer fcrr their fuller knowledge of the divine will, for a more perfect Christian life, and for a spirit of thanksgiving, seeing that it is God who guarantees their salvation in Christ (i.
It is Christ who is supreme, not angels, for He is the agent in creation; and it is solely on the basis of faith in Him, a faith expressing itself in love, that redemption is appropriated, and not on the basis of any further requirements such as ascetic practices and the worship of angels (i.
Quite apart from the difficulties created by the Tubingen theory, legitimate difficulties were found in the style of the letter, in the speculation of the errorists, and in the theology of the author.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /C/CO/COLOSSIANS_EPISTLE_TO_THE.htm   (1457 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Epistle to the Colossians
Colossians, Ephesians, and Philemon were written and dispatched at one and the same time, while Philippians was composed at a somewhat different period of the captivity.
Colossians was written as a warning against certain false teachers, about whom St. Paul had probably heard from Epaphras, his "fellow-prisoner" and the founder of the Church of the Colossians.
It may be noted in passing, that the words of the Epistle against the superstitious worship of angels cannot be taken as condemning the Catholic invocation of angels.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/04131b.htm   (3815 words)

  
 COLOSSIANS, EPISTLE TO THE in the Bible Encyclopedia - ISBE (Bible History Online)
The external evidence for the Epistle to the Colossians, prior to the middle of the 2nd century, is rather indeterminate.
The epistle was written, on the face of it, to the church at COLOSSAE (which see), a town in the Lycus valley where the gospel had been preached most probably by Epaphras (Col 17; 4:12), and where Paul was, himself, unknown personally (1:4,8,9; 2:1,5).
The occasion of the epistle was, we may be sure, the information brought by Epaphras that the church in Colosse was subject to the assault of a body of Judaistic Christians who were seeking to overthrow the faith of the Colossians and weaken their regard for Paul (Zahn).
www.bible-history.com /isbe/C/COLOSSIANS,+EPISTLE+TO+THE   (1817 words)

  
 Epistle to the Laodiceans - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Epistle to the Laodiceans is a short work found in some editions of the Vulgate, known only in Latin, purporting to be the epistle of Paul to the Laodiceans mentioned in the Epistle to the Colossians.
It is almost unanimously believed to be pseudepigraphy, being a pastiche of phrases taken from the genuine Pauline epistles.
Adolf von Harnack suggested that it was written by either Marcion or one of his followers, but despite scholarly examination his suggestion cannot be substantiated or denied.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Epistle_to_the_Laodiceans   (217 words)

  
 Colossians
Colossians 4:16 states that this letter to Colosse was to be shared with the brethren in Laodicea and the letter to Laodicea was go to the brethren in Colosse.
In Colossians 1:1 and 1:25, he says that even though he is an Apostle, it is not because of his own doing, but because it was the will of God.
We, like the Colossians, should conduct ourselves in wisdom with those who are not Christians (4:4-6) and cognizant of the time we should let our speech always be with grace as this is how we should answer every man of the reason of the hope that is in us.
www.heraldmag.org /olb/Contents/treatises/Colossians.htm   (2774 words)

  
 Epistle to the Colossians: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com - All about Epistle to the Colossians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
It was written by Paul at Rome during his first imprisonment there (Acts 28:16, 30), probably in the spring of A.D., or, as some think, 62, and soon after he had written his Epistle to Ephesians.
Like some of his other epistles (e.g., those to Corinth), this seems to have been written in consequence of information which had somehow been conveyed to him of the internal state of the church there (Col. 1:4-8).
The genuineness of this epistle has not been called in question.
www.encyclopedian.com /co/Colossians.html   (498 words)

  
 Colossians, Epistle To The (International Standard Bible Encyclopedia) :: Bible Tools   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The epistle was written, on the face of it, to the church at COLOSSAE (which see), a town in the Lycus valley where the gospel had been preached most probably by Epaphras (Colossians 1:7; Colossians 4:12), and where Paul was, himself, unknown personally (Colossians 1:4, Colossians 1:8-9; Colossians 2:1, Colossians 2:5).
From the epistle it is evident that the Colossian Christians were Gentiles (Colossians 1:27) for whom, as such, the apostle feels a responsibility (Colossians 2:1 ff.).
He sends to them Tychicus (Colossians 4:7), who is accompanied by Onesimus, one of their own community (Colossians 4:9), and urges them to be sure to read another letter which will reach them from Laodicea (Colossians 4:16).
bibletools.org /index.cfm/fuseaction/Def.show/RTD/ISBE/ID/2201   (1889 words)

  
 The Epistle to the Colossians, New Testament Introduction- Louis Berkhof.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Epistle to the Colossians, New Testament Introduction- Louis Berkhof.
Since the Colossians have all the fulness of the Godhead in their Lord and Saviour, are rooted in him, and have arisen with him to a new life, they should walk in him and avoid semi-Jewish practices and the worship of angels, 2:1-19.
According to the Epistle the Colossians were in danger of being misled by certain false teachings.
www.dabar.org /NewTestament/Berkhof/Epicol.htm   (2665 words)

  
 JFB Commentary on Colossians - Introduction
It is only in the Epistles, Romans and Ephesians, and this Epistle, such allusions are wanting; in that to the Romans, because, as in this Church of Colosse, he had not been the instrument of their conversion; in that to the Ephesians, owing to the general nature of the Epistle.
The Epistle to the Laodiceans (Col 4:16) was written before that to the Colossians, but probably was sent by him to Laodicea at the same time with that to the Church at Colosse.
Hence arises the striking similarity of many of the phrases in the two Epistles written about the same time, and generally in the same vein of spiritual thought; while the peculiar phrases of the Epistle to the Colossians are such as are natural, considering the controversial purpose of that Epistle.
bible.christiansunite.com /jfb.cgi?b=51&c=0&print=1   (850 words)

  
 The Development of the Canon of the New Testament - Epistle to the Laodiceans   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The epistle appears in more than 100 manuscripts of the Latin Vulgate (including the oldest, the celebrated codex Fuldensis, 546 CE), as well as in manuscripts of early Albigensian, Bohemian, English, and Flemish versions.
The Epistle to the Laodiceans is included in all 18 German Bibles printed prior to Luther's translation, beginning with the first German Bible, issued by Johann Mental at Strassburg in 1488.
And see that this epistle is read to the Colossians and that of the Colossians among you.
www.ntcanon.org /Epistle_to_the_Laodiceans.shtml   (1163 words)

  
 Laodiceans, Epistle To The (International Standard Bible Encyclopedia) :: Bible Tools   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Besides, the context regards the Epistle to the Colossians, and "that from Laodicea," as companion epistles, of which the two churches are to make an interchange, so that each church is directed to read both.
The apostle's injunction in Colossians 4:16 suggested the forgery, and such currency as it ever attained was due to the support which that passage was supposed to give to it.
Therefore as the epistle was not, and could not be, addressed to Ephesus, the conclusion is that it was addressed to some church, and that it was not a treatise sent to the Christian church generally.
bibletools.org /index.cfm/fuseaction/Def.show/RTD/ISBE/ID/5421   (2566 words)

  
 Paul's Epistle to the Laodiceans
This Epistle to the Laodiceans has been highly esteemed by several learned men of the church of Rome and others, including the Quakers, who have printed a translation and plead for it as canon.
This epistle, along with those to the Colossians, Ephesians, Philippians, and Philemon were likely written during Paul's Roman captivity, about A.D. For I know that this shall turn to my salvation forever, which shall be through your prayer and the supply of the Holy Spirit.
Cause this Epistle to be read to the Colossians, and the Epistle of the Colossians to be read among you.
www.reluctant-messenger.com /epistle-laodiceans.htm   (1137 words)

  
 Epistle to the Colossians -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Epistle to the Colossians is a book of the (The sacred writings of the Christian religions) Bible (The collection of books of the Gospels, Acts of the Apostles, the Pauline and other Epistles, and Revelation; composed soon after Christ's death; the second half of the Christian Bible) New Testament.
After friendly greetings (10-14), he bids them interchange this letter with that he had sent to the neighbouring church of (Click link for more info and facts about Laodicea) Laodicea.
(The apocryphal (Click link for more info and facts about Epistle to the Laodiceans) Epistle to the Laodiceans is almost universally believed to be a (Criminal falsification by making or altering an instrument with intent to defraud) forgery based on this instruction.) He then closes this brief but striking epistle with his usual autograph salutation.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/E/Ep/Epistle_to_the_Colossians.htm   (511 words)

  
 Colossians, Epistle to the (WebBible Encyclopedia) - ChristianAnswers.Net   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
This letter was written by Paul at Rome during his first imprisonment there (Acts 28:16, 30), probably in the spring of A.D. 57, or, as some think, 62, and soon after he had written his Epistle to the Ephesians.
Like some of his other epistles (e.g., those to Corinth), this seems to have been written in consequence of information which had somehow been conveyed to him of the internal state of the church there (Col.
There is a remarkable resemblance between this epistle and that to the Ephesians (q.v.).
www.www.christiananswers.net /dictionary/colossiansepistletothe.html   (412 words)

  
 Crosswalk.com
The PLACE from which it was written seems to have been Rome, during his first imprisonment there (Acts 28:17-31 to the Epistle to the Ephesians, it was shown that the three Epistles, Ephesians, Colossians, and Philemon, were sent at the same time, namely, during the freer portion of his imprisonment, before the death of Burrus.
Colossians 4:3,4; Ephesians 6:19,20 freedom than he had while writing to the Philippians, after the promotion of Tigellinus to be Prætorian Prefect.
Compare Colossians 2:8 (Colossians 2:15 (Colossians 2:18 communication" (Colossians 3:8 (Colossians 4:11 correspond to the majestic nature of his theme, the majesty of Christ's person and office, in contrast to the beggarly system of the Judaizers, the discussion of which was forced on him by the controversy.
bible.crosswalk.com /Commentaries/JamiesonFaussetBrown/jfb.cgi?book=col&chapter=000   (650 words)

  
 THE EPISTLE TO THE COLOSSIANS
Epaphras was the minister of the Colossian church (1:4-8; 4:12-13).
Colossians is the chart and compass which enables the believer to sail between the ever present Scylla and Charybdis.
Colossians - the Head of the body who is Christ; the body is only secondary (1:18).
www.bibleinst.com /BibleSchool/NT-U-4C.htm   (2698 words)

  
 [No title]
However, as St. Paul was the great Apostle of the Gentiles, he wrote this Epistle to the Colossians when he was in prison, and about the same time that he wrote to the Ephesians and Philippians.
And when this epistle shall have been read with you, cause that it be read also in the church of the Laodiceans: and that you read that which is of the Laodiceans.
Some expound these words of an epistle which St. Paul wrote to the Laodiceans, and is since lost, for that now extant is no more than a collection of sentences out of the other epistles of St. Paul; therefore it cannot be considered even as a part of that epistle.
www.ewtn.com /library/SCRIPTUR/COLOS.TXT   (2736 words)

  
 Colossians Introduction - A Study Guide by Mark A. Copeland
Though he was with Paul at the time the epistle was written, Epaphras is identified as "one of you" (4:12), suggesting that he may have originally been from Colosse.
By comparing the epistle to the Colossians with that written to Philemon, it is reasonable to suppose that the church at Colosse met in their home (cf.
The indication is that the epistles to the Colossians, Philemon and the Ephesians were carried to their destination by Tychicus and Onesimus (cf.
www.churchesofchrist.net /authors/Mark_A_Copeland/colo/colo_00.htm   (1229 words)

  
 [No title]
The epistle ends with a request for lodging in the near future, and with sundry greetings from individuals who were with Paul in Rome (22-25).
As clearly indicated in verses 1, 9, 19 B. By carefully comparing this epistle with the one to the Colossians, it is clear that both were written at the same time and from the same place a.
Onesimus, the subject of the epistle to Philemon, was one of the messengers by whom the epistle to the Colossians was sent (Co 4:7-9) 2.
www.iclnet.org /pub/resources/text/exeout/EXEOUT17.txt   (2650 words)

  
 Epistle to the Colossians
Scholars are divided on whether it was written by Saint Paul during one of his imprisonments after AD 60 or by a later follower of Paul who further developed some of his ideas.
Colossians has many passages in common with the Epistle to the Ephesians, especially the passages that describe the church as a body, with Christ as its head.
The Epistle to the Colossians was written by Paul at Rome during his first imprisonment there (Acts 28:16, 30), probably in the spring of A.D. 57, or, as some think, 62, and soon after he had written his Epistle to the Ephesians.
mb-soft.com /believe/txs/colossia.htm   (558 words)

  
 Epistle al Colossians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Colossians ha molti passaggi il in comune con il Epistle al Ephesians, particolarmente i passaggi che descrivono la chiesa come corpo, con Christ come relativa testa.
Come alcuni dei suoi altri epistles (per esempio, quelli a Corinth), questo sembra essere scritto di conseguenza delle informazioni che era stato trasportato in qualche modo a lui della condizione interna della chiesa là (colonna 1:4-8).
Allora chiude questo breve ma epistle notevole con il suo salutation autografo usuale.
www.mb-soft.com /believe/tis/colossia.htm   (535 words)

  
 Lost Books and Latter-Day Revelation
The epistle in question is probably simply the New Testament book of Ephesians, which was a circular letter — like Colosians itself (Col. 4:16) — that bears the name of only the largest of several cities in the region where it circulated.
Instead, when we consider the early Church's universal respect for the writings of Paul, and the fact that its literature quotes extensively and exclusively from his canonical epistles, we may safely conclude that in the providence of God this unknown epistle was not preserved because it did not bear the stamp of inspired revelation.
Jude the brother of James, left a short epistle which is reckoned among the seven catholic [general] epistles, and because in it he quotes from the apocryphal book of Enoch it is rejected by many.
www.irr.org /mit/lostbooks.html   (7989 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.