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Topic: Epoch astronomy


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  * Epoch - (Astronomy): Definition
An epoch is a division of a geologic period; it is the smallest division of geologic time, lasting several million years.
Fourth epoch in the history of the Universe, lasting from about 100 sec to 106 yr, in which matter came to dominate radiation as the principal constituent of the Universe.
In the current epoch, asteroids are the majority of impactors.4 A combination of asteroid-to-asteroid collisions, gravitational effects such as the pull of Jupiter and Mars,...
en.mimi.hu /astronomy/epoch.html   (855 words)

  
 Epoch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In computing and telecommunications, an epoch date is a specific date and time used as the reference for all other times.
In astronomy, an epoch (astronomy) is a moment in time for which celestial coordinates or orbital elements are specified.
The epoch of a calendar era is the year, day, or instant from which the later (and earlier) years of a calendar are counted.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Epoch   (331 words)

  
 epoch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
In computing, an epoch is a specific date and time used as the reference for all other times.
In astronomy, an epoch is a moment in time for which celestial coordinates or orbital elements are specified.
In telecommunication, an epoch date is a date in history, chosen as the reference date from which time is measured (see epoch date).
www.yourencyclopedia.net /Epoch.html   (278 words)

  
 Epoch (astronomy) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The currently used standard epoch is J2000.0, which is January 1, 2000 at 12:00 TT.
The prefix "J" indicates that it is a Julian epoch.
The previous standard epoch was B1950.0, with the prefix "B" indicating it was a Besselian epoch.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Epoch_(astronomy)   (213 words)

  
 J2000.0 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The earlier epoch that was in standard use was the B1950.0 epoch.
Novices are sometimes confused by finding that the Earth's rotational North pole does not point quite at the J2000 celestial pole at the epoch J2000.0; the reason is that the true pole of epoch suffers nutation ("is nutated") away from the mean one.
The "J" in the prefix indicates that it is a Julian epoch, as opposed to a Besselian epoch.
www.lighthousepoint.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/J2000   (254 words)

  
 Epoch (astronomy) -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
In (The branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole) astronomy, an epoch is a moment in time for which (Click link for more info and facts about celestial coordinate) celestial coordinates or (Click link for more info and facts about orbital element) orbital elements are specified.
The currently used standard epoch is (Click link for more info and facts about J2000.0) J2000.0, which is January 1, 2000 at 12:00 ((astronomy) a measure of time defined by Earth's orbital motion; terrestrial time is mean solar time corrected for the irregularities of the Earth's motions) TT.
Epochs for orbital elements are usually given in ((astronomy) a measure of time defined by Earth's orbital motion; terrestrial time is mean solar time corrected for the irregularities of the Earth's motions) Terrestrial Time, in several different formats, including:
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/e/ep/epoch_(astronomy).htm   (380 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Astronomy
Descriptive astronomy, meanwhile took its rise from the invention of the telescope, and the facilities thus afforded for the close scrutiny of the denizens of the sky; while practical astronomy gained continually in refinement with the improvement of optical and mechanical arts.
But mathematical astronomy, grounded on the law of gravitation keeps its place apart, though depending for the perfecting of its theories and the widening of its scope upon advances along the old, and explorations in new, directions.
Greek astronomy was embodied in Ptolerny's "Almagest" (the name is of mixed Greek and Arabic derivation), composed at Alexandria about the middle of the second century A. It was based upon the geocentric principle.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/02025a.htm   (4544 words)

  
 J2000.0 -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The J2000.0 (A unit of geological time) epoch is used in (The branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole) astronomy.
The earlier epoch that was in standard use was the (Click link for more info and facts about B1950.0) B1950.0 epoch.
Novices are sometimes confused by finding that the Earth's rotational North pole does not point quite at the J2000 celestial pole at the epoch J2000.0; the reason is that the true pole of epoch suffers (Uncontrolled nodding) nutation ("is nutated") away from the mean one.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/J/J2/J2000.0.htm   (267 words)

  
 Meade Instruments Corporation - Meade® EPOCH 2000 Astronomical Software - 1
Meade Epoch 2000 astronomical software permits a significant advance in the way amateur astronomers prepare for their observing sessions at the telescope, as well as in the way CCD images are processed.
For Epoch 2000 resolves two basic astronomical issues: (a) Epoch 2000sk sky software presents on the display of a personal computer a detailed simulation of the entire celestial sphere; (b) Epoch 2000ip image processing software permits professional-level analysis and processing of the digital images yielded by CCD imaging cameras.
Use Epoch 2000sk to zoom-in on telescopic fields smaller than one arc-second, view the entire 180° sky in one PC display, or image any sky area at any scale of your choosing.
www.meade.com /catalog/meade_epoch/meade_epoch_2000_01.htm   (278 words)

  
 epoch --  Encyclopædia Britannica   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The use of “epoch” is usually restricted to divisions of the Tertiary and...
It is preceded by the Pliocene Epoch of the Tertiary Period and is followed by the Holocene...
The Pliocene is the last and shortest epoch of the Tertiary Period.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9032824?tocId=9032824   (855 words)

  
 Astronomy
Astronomy, in the real sense, started among the Arabs during the early period of the Abbasid Caliphate.
Khwarizmi has written a valuable treatise on astronomy and has compiled his own Tables (zij) which, after two centuries was revised by Spanish atronomer Majriti (011007) and was translated into Latin by Adelard of Bath.
It was during the reign of Mamun, that practical steps were taken for the advancement of astronomy and several observatories equipped with the latest instruments were set up at various places in his domain.
www.netmuslims.com /info/astronomy.html   (2129 words)

  
 Epoch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
In telecommunication, an epoch date is a calendar datedate in history, chosen as the reference date from which time/ is measured.
In astronomy, an epoch (astronomy)epoch is a moment in time for which celestial coordinates or orbitorbital elements are specified.
When the player first discovers Epoch, it is only capable of time travel to the exact same point in a different era.
www.infothis.com /find/Epoch   (548 words)

  
 Epoch_2000, Temporal Epoch Calculator by James Q. Jacobs
The inclination angle of the earth's axis of rotation (the obliquity of the ecliptic) is also variable.
In previous epochs, the duration of solar and lunar orbit and the position of the sun, for example summer solstice horizon azimuth at Stonehenge, would have been different than they are today.
I have written a small application, Epoch_2000, Temporal Epoch Calculator (a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet), to facilitate the calculation of temporal epoch variation in astronomical constants, in the obliquity of the ecliptic, and in angles of solar and lunar illumination at any specified latitude.
www.jqjacobs.net /astro/epoch_2000.html   (676 words)

  
 Nat' Academies Press, Working Papers: Astronomy and Astrophysics Panel Reports (1991)
Recent observations in the optical have established that the epoch of initial nucleosynthesis, star formation, and galaxy formation is at a sufficiently high redshift that the initial formation epoch can only be observed in the infrared, because the redshift must be greater than 5.
Such observations of old stellar populations in distant galaxies will set limits on the epoch of star formation in the universe, but direct observation of the first generation of star formation is the ultimate goal.
Depending on the redshift of the formation epoch, near to mid-infrared observations will be required to detect the intrinsic ultraviolet luminosity from hot, young stars.
www.nap.edu /books/0309043832/html/29.html   (956 words)

  
 Category:Astronomy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Astronomy is a science involving the observation and explanation of events occurring outside Earth and its atmosphere.
It studies the origins, evolution, physical and chemical properties of objects that can be observed in the sky (and are outside the earth), as well as the processes involving them.
For more information, see the main article about Astronomy.
www.bucyrus.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Category:Astronomy   (122 words)

  
 [No title]
The currently used epoch is J2000.0, which corresponds to the situation at (Universal Time) 12:00, January 1, 2000, corresponding to the Julian day 2451545.
Moving to a different epoch one must use a year length of exactly 365.25 days.
Phase is defined as the fractional portion of the number of periods, which have elapsed since a given epoch.
www.astro.utoronto.ca /~percy/akos2.htm   (1027 words)

  
 Glossary of astronomical terms
The recent change to Julian year usage in dynamical astronomy (and the J2000.0 equinox) took effect in solar-system ephemerides of the Minor Planet Center and Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams on Jan. 1, 1992.
Either of the two points (vernal, autumnal) on the celestial sphere where the ecliptic (which is the apparent path of the sun on the sky) intersects the celestial equator.
In astronomy, the measurement of the light emitting from astronomical objects, generally in the visible or infrared bands, in which a specific or general wavelength band is normally specified.
cfa-www.harvard.edu /icq/ICQGlossary.html   (3501 words)

  
 Calspace - Glossary of Terms -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Short name for the National Astronomy and Ionospheric Center (NAIC) at Arecibo, Puerto Rico; often refers only to the NAIC 1000-ft (305-m) zenith (䔸°) antenna, the world's largest radio astronomy collector.
Branch of astronomy that focuses on measurements, especially those relating to positions and movements.
Hypothetical first epoch in the history of the Universe, lasting 10" sec: a period about which we cannot yet even speculate.
calspace.ucsd.edu /virtualmuseum/Glossary_Astro/gloss_a-f.shtml   (4109 words)

  
 Second   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Earth's motion was described in Newcomb's Tables of the Sun/, which provides a formula for the motion of the Sun at the epoch 1900 based on astronomical observations made during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
Reference to the year 1900 does not mean that this is the epoch of a mean solar day of 86,400 seconds.
Rather, it is the epoch of the tropical year of 31,556,925.9747 seconds of ephemeris time.
www.infothis.com /find/Second   (772 words)

  
 Hindu Cosmological Time Cycles   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The modern SuryaSiddhanta in the commentary states that at the kaliyuga epoch the mean longitude of the Sun coincides with the fixed initial point of the sidereal sphere and is 54° from the mean vernal equinox.
But the astronomy of these peoples, by all the available evidence, was in every case vastly inferior to the astronomical science which made possible the development of Hindu cosmological time cycles.
By the epochs preserved within the time cycles themselves as well as by extensive references throughout Sanskrit literature, the cosmological time cycles appear to be older even than Hindu civilization.
www.webspace4me.net /~blhill/pages.aux/astrology/hindu.cycles.html   (5808 words)

  
 Submitted Proposals (Text)
The Windows-based EPOCH 2000™ astronomy program produced by Farpoint Research will be at the heart of the observatory system for automatically and remotely controlling the telescope.
The project is partially applicable to conventional optical astronomy facilities and the Remote Telescope Network.
The Windows-based EPOCH 2000 astronomy program will be at the heart of the observatory system for automatically and remotely controlling the telescope.
www.coseti.org /9308-004.htm   (546 words)

  
 ipowerweb home page
No one can date that remote epoch when astronomy "began"- we can say only that the fascination with the heavens is as old as man’s ability to think; as ancient as his capacity to wonder and to dream.
And in any company with most of the special enchantments of human life, the unique appeal of astronomy is incommunicable, easily understood through direct experience, but not to be precisely defined or explained.
The appeal of astronomy is both intellectual and aesthetic; it combines the thrill of exploration and discovery, the fun of sight-seeing, and the sheer pleasure with firsthand acquaintance with incredibly wonderful and beautiful things.
www.pauldibono.com   (292 words)

  
 Astronomy Software Reviews
Subject: Epoch 2000sk review Sent: Monday, May 7, 2001 07:00:24 From: jah@helix.nih.gov (John Hanover) I was fortunate enough to stumble into Natural Wonders during their "going out of business" sale and purchased the Epoch 2000sk-CD software at a greatly reduced price.
Epoch 2000 has a feature called "autotrack" which follows the scope and as it slews and gives a realistic view of what to expect in the eyepiece.
As the autostar directs the scope to an object, Epoch follows it and outputs a field nearly identical to the one in the eyepiece.
www.weasner.com /etx/software_reviews.html   (9386 words)

  
 Zoom Astronomy Glossary: E
He also accurately measured the tilt of the Earth's axis and the distance to the sun and moon, and devised a method for determining the prime numbers up to a given number (the Sieve of Eratosthenes).
Eratosthenes was a brilliant all-around scholar; although not the top expert on any topic, he was well-versed in all subjects, and therefore nicknamed "Beta" (which is the second letter of the Greek alphabet).
If the astronomy term you are looking for is not in the dictionary, please e-mail us.
www.enchantedlearning.com /subjects/astronomy/glossary/indexe.shtml   (2703 words)

  
 epoch - OneLook Dictionary Search
noun: (astronomy) the precise date that is the point of reference for which information (as coordinates of a celestial body) is referred
Phrases that include epoch: epoch making, pleistocene epoch, holocene epoch, miocene epoch, oligocene epoch, more...
Words similar to epoch: era, age, date of reference, period, more...
www.onelook.com /cgi-bin/cgiwrap/bware/dofind.cgi?word=epoch   (304 words)

  
 The Constitution of Kenya Review Commission   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Thus the difficulties in finding the properties of The outside universe from this projection is clearly illustrated in Plato's study of the Observers in The cave in one of his famous dialogue.
The dominance of the Greek philosophy in Astronomy and Science was finally challenged by some Scientists in Western Europe at the beginning of the Sixteenth Century almost simultaneously with the climax of renaissance of the antique ideals in Art and Architecture.
Thus a new Epoch in Astronomy was started by Copenicus, Tycho, Brahe, Kepler, and Gaiileo; who all emphasized the fundamental importance of Observations in describing the properties of the solar system.
www.kenyaconstitution.org /docs/07d033.htm   (4987 words)

  
 Holocene Epoch --  Encyclopædia Britannica
formerly Recent Epoch, younger of the two epochs that comprise the Quaternary Period and the latest interval of geologic time, covering approximately the last 10,000 years of the Earth's history (see Table).
The Quaternary Period is divided into the Pleistocene Epoch (1,600,000 to 10,000 years ago) and the Holocene, or Recent, Epoch (the past 10,000 years).
It represents a phase of continuing volcanic activity that caused the basement rocks of the Ahaggar and Tibesti mountains of the central Sahara to rise.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9117456?&query=holocene   (894 words)

  
 A History of Science, V3   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Meantime, astronomy and what the workers of the elder day called natural philosophy become wonderfully diversified and present numerous phases that would have been startling enough to the star-gazers and philosophers of the earlier epoch.
Thus, for example, in the field of astronomy, Herschel is able, thanks to his perfected telescope, to discover a new planet and then to reach out into the depths of space and gain such knowledge of stars and nebulae as hitherto no one had more than dreamed of.
The opening up of this "astronomy of the invisible" is another of the great achievements of the nineteenth century, and again it is Bessel to whom the honor of discovery is due.
www.blackmask.com /books72c/3hsci.htm   (17939 words)

  
 Astronomy: Epoch making   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Molecular hydrogen is the gas that stars form from under normal conditions, but to get atomic hydrogen cold enough to form molecules it needs trace 'contaminants' like carbon monoxide to radiate away the energy.
The speed with which primordial atomic hydrogen gets contaminated to begin the formation of stars in normal galaxies has been a significant question in astronomy.
Redshifts this high provide a window on the epoch of galaxy formation, when the Universe was only one-sixteenth of its present age.
www.nature.com /nature/links/030724/030724-3.html   (204 words)

  
 CASS/UCSD Public Outreach -- Astronomy & Astrophysics Education   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Astronomy Cafe conducted by NASA Astronomer, Dr. Sten Odenwald answers questions about Astronomy and what it's like to be an Astronomer.
Bad Astronomy takes well aimed shots at the misuse of Astronomy and Physics in the media and other popular culture.
Astronomy: From the Earth to the Universe by Jay Pasachoff
cassfos02.ucsd.edu /public/astroed2.html   (1909 words)

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