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Topic: Erechtheus


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  Erechtheus
Erechtheus the First, known as Erechtheus or Erechthonios (not to be confused with Erechthonius the Second, believed to be the son of Pandion and the nymph Zeuxippe), he was, according to legend, an early king of Athens.
Erechtheus was said to have founded the "Panathenaia", a festival in honor of Athena, when the cult statue of Athena Polias, housed within the Erechtheion, receives a new "peplos" (woolen gown).
The sacred snake of Erechtheus was depicted on the inside of the shield which the chryselephantine (gold and ivory) statue of Athena Parthenos held in her hand.
www.pantheon.org /articles/e/erechtheus.html   (460 words)

  
 Erechtheus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Erechtheus and Butes divided the royal power possessed by Pandion, Erechtheus taking the physical rule but Butes taking the priesthood of Athena and Poseidon, this right being passed on to his descendants.
Erechtheus was father by his wife Praxithea of several daughers: Protogeneia, Pandora, Procris, Creusa, Oreithyia, Chthonia, and Merope some of whom have their own stories.
Erechtheus is succeeded by Cecrops II, his brother according to a fragment from the poet Castor but his son according to Apollodorus (3.15.1).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Erechtheus   (338 words)

  
 Erechtheus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
This second Erechtheus was son and heir King Pandion I of Athens by Zeuxippe this Pandion being son of Erichthonius Erechtheus I. According to Apollodorus Erechtheus had a twin brother named Butes who married Erechtheus' daughter Chthonia.
Erechtheus was father by his wife Praxithea several daughers: Protogeneia Pandora Procris Creusa Oreithyia Chthonia and Merope some of which have their own
Erechtheus is succeeded by Cecrops II his according to a fragment from the poet but his son according to Apollodorus (3.15.1).
www.freeglossary.com /Erechtheus_II   (555 words)

  
 Athens
In classical times, Erechtheus, seen as the perfect king by the Athenians, and who, in early times was often identified with Erichthonius (like him, he was sometime credited with the insitution of the festival of Panathenæa and the invention of the chariot), had a quasi-divine status, and was even eventually identified with Poseidon.
Erechtheus was succeeded by his son Cecrops, second of that name, who married Metadiousa, daughter of his nephew Eupalamus (the son of his brother Metion), then by their son Pandion, also second of that name.
He was, as was mentioned earlier, a son of Erechtheus' daughter Creüsa and either Apollo (in Euripides' version) or the Thessalian Xouthus, and the brother of Achæus (the eponym of the Achæans).
www.plato-dialogues.org /tools/loc/athens.htm   (5201 words)

  
 the atrium | golden threads | art and archaeology | connelly's parthenon II
The procession is "the first commemorative sacrifice in honor of Erechtheus and his daughters." The nine or ten men usually seen as the eponymous heroes or as the archons are generic elders.
The chariots and the lack of hoplites in the procession accord with the idea that this is an army of the distant past, not a fifth century army.
Erechtheus and her sisters die; such is the news that is related to her mother at the end of the play, as C recognizes.
www.atrium-media.com /goldenthreads/connellyparthenon2.html   (2758 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Erechtheus
Protogeneia was one of the daughters of King Erechtheus of Athens in Greek mythology.
In Greek mythology, Metion was a son of King Erechtheus of Athens or of Eupalamus son of King Erechtheus.
Pandion I was son and heir to Erichthonius of Athens and the father of Erechtheus, Butes, Cecrops II, Procne, and Philomela by Zeuxippe.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Erechtheus   (947 words)

  
 ERECHTHEUS - LoveToKnow Article on ERECHTHEUS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Erechtheus of later times was supposed to be the grandson of ErechtheusErichthonius, and was also king of Athens.
Eumolpus was slain and Erechtheus was victorious, but was himself killed by Poseidon, the father of Eumolpus, or by a thunderbolt from Zeus.
The birth of Erichthonius (as a corn-spirit) is interpreted by Mannhardt as a mythical way of describing the growth of the corn, and by J. Harrison (Myths and Monuments of Ancient Athens, xxvii.xxxvi.) as a fiction to explain the ceremony performed by the two ~maidens called Arrephori.
76.1911encyclopedia.org /E/ER/ERECHTHEUS.htm   (433 words)

  
 Erechtheus - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Erechtheus in Greek Mythology was the name of one king of Athens and a secondary name for another.
This second Erechtheus was son and heir to King Pandion I of Athens by Zeuxippe, this Pandion being son of Erichthonius / Erechtheus I. According to Apollodorus, Erechtheus had a twin brother named Butes who married Erechtheus' daughter Chthonia.
Poseidon in Athens was generally known as Poseidon Erechtheus and the vestibule of Poseidon's temple was named the Erechtheion.
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /erechtheus.htm   (405 words)

  
 SSWFT: The Strife for Attica   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
It is strange that Erechtheus would be seen in Poseidon's half of the wing, as Poseidon is said to have killed Erechtheus in revenge for the king's murder of the god's son Eumolpus after Athens won their war.
However, "the rites with which Erechtheus was honored on the Acropolis were closely identified with those of Poseidon," and Tripp suggests that Erechtheus may have originally a local deity whose functions were taken over by Poseidon.
Erechtheus is, of course, honored on the Acropolis with the Erechtheum, a building second only to the Parthenon in importance.
www.operation-a801.com /sswft/strife.html   (3931 words)

  
 House of Athens
Erechtheus was the son of Pandion and Zeuxippe.
Erechtheus married Praxithea, the daughter of Phrasimus and Diogeneia.
Erechtheus was the father of Cecrops, Pandorus and Metion, as well as a number of daughters, including Creüsa (Creusa), Oreithyia and Procris.
www.timelessmyths.com /classical/athens.html   (3057 words)

  
 Athens, Greek Mythology Link.
At the death of Pandion 2, his sons divided their inheritance, Erechtheus becoming king of Athens, and Butes 2 receiving the priesthood of Athena and Poseidon.
Erechtheus inquired of the oracle how the Athenians might win victory, and the oracle answered that they would win the war if he would sacrifice one of his daughters.
Peteos was, nevertheless, pursued during the reign of Aegeus 1 and migrated from Attica to Phocis.
homepage.mac.com /cparada/GML/Athens.html   (1861 words)

  
 Erechtheus and his daughters
Erechtheus that his city Athens was not so big at that time was worried and he decided to go to the oracle of Delphi and to ask Pythia the priestess what he must do to win the Thracean army.
Erechtheus talked to his wife Praxithea and told her about the oracle.
Erechtheus and his Athenians fought bravely for hours and forced the invading army to retreat after having major casualties and their own king Eumolpus dead by the hand of Erechtheus.
www.steliart.com /theseus_erechtheus_and_his_daughters.html   (546 words)

  
 Erechtheus and the Arrephoria
Aglauros and Herse disobeyed, and, maddened by the sight of Erechtheus inside, threw themselves to their deaths from the Acropolis.
Erechtheus himself has long been recognized as a vegetation deity who dies and is reborn each year (Nilsson, MMR² 531-583).
Supporting Erechtheus' vegetation status, the term of office of the Arrephoroi corresponded approximately to the season of plant growth in Greece (end of Pyanopsion &endash; Skirophorion; Harpokration, Suda s.v.
www.apaclassics.org /AnnualMeeting/05mtg/abstracts/SIMMS.html   (547 words)

  
 Eumolpus
According to Pausanias Eumolpus was a son of Poseidon and Chione, who was the daughter of the North-East Wind and Oreithuia from the Athenian royal family of Erechtheus.
The other version of the myth is telling us, that Erechtheus was the killer of Eumolpos and that his father Poseidon asked Zeus to take revenge.
Zeus annihilated Erechtheus by a lightning, but some authors are describing, that Poseidon knocked him down in Makra and that the earth was opened to swallow him.
www.pantheon.org /articles/e/eumolpus.html   (535 words)

  
 Erechtheus -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Erechtheus in (The mythology of the ancient Greeks) Greek Mythology was the name of one (Click link for more info and facts about king of Athens) king of Athens and a secondary name for another.
Erechtheus is succeeded by (Click link for more info and facts about Cecrops) Cecrops II, his brother according to a fragment from the poet Castor but his son according to (Click link for more info and facts about Apollodorus) Apollodorus (3.15.1).
Other sons of Erechtheus sometimes mentioned are Orneus, (Click link for more info and facts about Metion) Metion, (Click link for more info and facts about Pandorus) Pandorus, Thespius, and Eupalamus.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/E/Er/Erechtheus.htm   (295 words)

  
 PANATHENAEA - LoveToKnow Article on PANATHENAEA   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
It was originally a religious celebration, founded by Erechtheus (Erichthonius), in honor of Athena Polias, the patron goddess of the city.
It is said that when Theseus united the whole land under one government he made the festival of the city-goddess common to the entire country, and changed the older name Athenaea to Panathenaea (Plutarch, Tljeseus, 24).
Many kinds of contest, such as the chariot race of the apobatai (said to have beefi introduced by Erechtheus), which were not in use at Olympia, were practised in Athens.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /P/PA/PANATHENAEA.htm   (816 words)

  
 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 48 (v. 2)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
There can be little doubt but that the names Erichthonius and Erechtheus are identical; but whether the two heroes mentioned by Plato, Hyginus, and Apollodorus, the one of whom is usually called Erichthonius or Erechtheus I. and the other Erech­theus II., are likewise one and the same person, as Muller (Orchom.
Erechtheus II., as he is called, is described as a grandson of the first, and as a son of Pandion by Zeuxippe, so that he was a brother of Butes, Procne, and Philomela.
He was the husband of Astyoche or Callirrhoe, and father of Tros or Assaracus, and the wealthiest of all mortals, for 3000 mares grazed in his fields, which were so beautiful, that Boreas fell in love with them.
ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/1156.html   (1013 words)

  
 Read about Erechtheus at WorldVillage Encyclopedia. Research Erechtheus and learn about Erechtheus here!   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
This second Erechtheus was son and heir to King Pandion I of Athens by
Erechtheus was father by his wife Praxithea of several daughers:
Chione daugher of Boreas by Oreithyia daughter of Erechtheus and was therefore Erechtheus' own great-grandson.
encyclopedia.worldvillage.com /s/b/Erechtheus   (378 words)

  
 Erechtheus. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
This enabled him to win the battle, but Poseidon later destroyed him and all his house.
Erechtheus is often confused with Erichthonius, his grandfather.
Both were associated with the worship of Athena; one or the other is said to have built a temple which was the forerunner to the Erechtheum built in the 5th cent.
www.bartleby.com /65/er/Erechthes.html   (139 words)

  
 Bryn Mawr Classical Review 94.03.09
The focus of the inquiry is the group of man (Erechtheus) woman (Praxithea), two girls and a small child (the daughters of Erechtheus) centered on the folding of what is commonly considered Athena's peplos.
Although C. asserts that the folded cloth on the East frieze is not Athena's peplos, she maintains that the putative maleness of this figure would be entirely inappropriate for such an interpretation: C. maintains that the male hands of a temple boy would be polluting to the goddess' property.
It is this sacrificial clothing which Erechtheus, dressed as priest in a long ungirt chiton, is unfolding with the child's help.
ccat.sas.upenn.edu /bmcr/1994/94.03.09.html   (4593 words)

  
 Erechtheus (legendary king of Athens) - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Erechtheus (legendary king of Athens)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
According to legend, when Eumolpus attacked Athens in support of the Eleusinians, Erechtheus inquired of the oracle how his people could win the war.
Eumolpus was killed and Erechtheus was victorious, but he himself was killed by Zeus with a thunderbolt at the request of Poseidon, the god of the sea.
This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Erechtheus+(legendary+king+of+Athens)   (154 words)

  
 Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, page 223   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The original sanctuary of the tutelary deities of Athens, Athene P61Ias, (the goddess of the city), Pfiseidon, and Erechtheus.
The old temple, said to have been built by Erechtheus, was burnt by the Persians in 480 b.c.
Here were three altars, one common to Poseidon and Erechtheus, the other to Hephaestus and the hero Butes.
www.ancientlibrary.com /seyffert/0226.html   (828 words)

  
 Erechtheus
There were three people in Greek mythology with the name Erechtheus.
This person was known as King Erectheus the First of Athens and killed Himmarados.
King Erechtheus the Second of Athens, son of Pandion and Zeuxippe.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/er/Erechtheus.html   (66 words)

  
 Erechtheum   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Erechtheum housed the tomb of Erechtheus, the statue of Athena Polias and the cult of Poseidon.
Erechtheus was an early king of Athens and was regarded, along with Cecrops, another early king, as the original ancestor
This is the spot where, according to the myth, Athena caused an olive tree to grow when she was contesting Poseidon for the honor of being the patron divinity of Athens.
depthome.brooklyn.cuny.edu /classics/dunkle/athnlife/erechths.htm   (199 words)

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