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Topic: Eric Raymond


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In the News (Sat 20 Jul 19)

  
  Eric S. Raymond
Eric Steven Raymond (born December 4, 1957) (often referred to by his initials, ESR) is the author of "The Cathedral and the Bazaar" and the present maintainer of the "Jargon File" (also known as "The New Hacker's Dictionary").
Raymond's tactics have scored a number of remarkable successes, beginning with the release of the Mozilla source code in 1998, and he is widely credited by both hackers and mainstream observers with having taken the open source mission to Wall Street more effectively than anyone before him.
Raymond addresses some of these assertions in his essay "Take My Job, Please!" [1], where he argues that if anyone is qualified and willing to take his job and present the case for open source to the world, he would "back them to the hilt".
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/e/er/eric_s__raymond.html   (1101 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Eric Raymond
Raymond coined the aphorism "Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow." He credits Linus Torvalds with the inspiration for this quotation, which he dubs "Linus's law".
Raymond and his supporters have credited his tactics with a number of remarkable successes, beginning with the release of the Mozilla (then Netscape) source code in 1998, and he is widely credited with having taken the open source mission to Wall Street more effectively than earlier advocates.
Raymond addresses some of these criticisms in his essay "Take My Job, Please!" [11] (http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/take-my-job-please.html), where he argues that if anyone is qualified and willing to take his job and present the case for open source to the world, he would "back them to the hilt".
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Eric-Raymond   (1102 words)

  
 Eric S. Raymond - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Eric Steven Raymond (born December 4, 1957), often referred to as ESR, is the author of "The Cathedral and the Bazaar" and the present maintainer of the "Jargon File" (also known as "The New Hacker's Dictionary").
After 1997 Raymond became a prominent voice in the open source movement and was one of the founders of the Open Source Initiative.
Raymond addresses some of these criticisms in his essay "Take My Job, Please!" [12], where he argues that if anyone is qualified and willing to take his job and present the case for open source to the world, he would "back them to the hilt".
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Eric_S._Raymond   (1062 words)

  
 The Cathedral and the Bazaar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Cathedral and the Bazaar is an essay by Eric S. Raymond on software engineering methods, based on his observations of the Linux kernel development process and his experiences managing an open source project, fetchmail.
The essay's central thesis is Raymond's proposition that Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow (which he terms Linus's law): if the source code is available for public testing, scrutiny, and experimentation, then bugs will be discovered at a rapid rate.
In contrast, Raymond claims that an inordinate amount of time and energy must be spent hunting for bugs in the Cathedral model, since the working version of the code is available only to a few developers.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/The_Cathedral_and_the_Bazaar   (530 words)

  
 Eric S. Raymond -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Raymond coined the aphorism "Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow." He credits (Click link for more info and facts about Linus Torvalds) Linus Torvalds with the inspiration for this quotation, which he dubs " (Click link for more info and facts about Linus's law) Linus's law".
Raymond's claim to being a "Core Linux Developer" has drawn criticism since he has never had code accepted into Linux (the kernel), and his largest open source code contributions amount to relatively small portions of fetchmail, Ncurses, and Emacs editing modes.
Raymond addresses some of these criticisms in his essay "Take My Job, Please!", where he argues that if anyone is qualified and willing to take his job and present the case for open source to the world, he would "back them to the hilt".
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/e/er/eric_s._raymond.htm   (1333 words)

  
 Joel on Software - Biculturalism
Raymond invents an amusing story to illustrate this which will ring true to anyone who has ever used a library in binary form.
Raymond may call it "oversimplifying condescension," but the Windows culture understands that end users don't like reading and if they concede to read your documentation, they will only read the minimum amount, and so you have to explain things repeatedly...
Raymond does attempt to compare and contrast Unix to other operating systems, and this is really the weakest part of an otherwise excellent book, because he really doesn't know what he's talking about.
www.joelonsoftware.com /articles/Biculturalism.html   (1863 words)

  
 Salon 21st | Let my software go!
The first time I met Eric Raymond, the co-author of "The New Hacker's Dictionary," he flamed me hairless after I sent him e-mail seeking clarification of a point of research for a project I was working on.
Raymond is an influential advocate of the principle of free software -- which declares that the best way to produce quality software is to give the world free access to the underlying source code.
Raymond's essay "The Cathedral and the Bazaar" is one of the most eloquent explications of the theory that software design is best served by having a community of independent hackers work together in an atmosphere of complete openness.
archive.salon.com /21st/feature/1998/04/cov_14feature.html   (925 words)

  
 Eric Raymond   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Eric Raymond blanches whenever he hears the term cyber used as a prefix.
Eric Raymond is known as the editor of The New Hacker's Dictionary.
Eric Raymond's New Hacker's Dictionary defines a magic cookie as "something passed between routines or programs that enables the receiver to perform some operation; a capability ticket or opaque identifier.
www.wired.com /wired/archive/people/eric_raymond   (224 words)

  
 Open-source advocate: Release Java code | CNET News.com
Eric S. Raymond, president of the Open Source Initiative, said in an open letter Thursday that Sun needs to choose between controlling Java and seeing it spread as widely as possible.
Raymond's remarks were in response to a Wednesday speech in which McNealy said, "The open-source model is our friend." The CEO argued that Sun is better able than competitors to withstand the advent of open-source software, which can be obtained at no cost.
Raymond is the author of an influential essay on open-source programming, titled "The Cathedral and the Bazaar," and more recently of a document disputing the SCO Group's claims that Linux infringes on Unix intellectual property.
news.com.com /2100-7344-5159134.html   (1004 words)

  
 O'Reilly: An Interview with Eric Raymond
The book's author, Eric Raymond, one of the Open Source Movement's most articulate leaders, recently talked with oreilly.com about the soon-to-be-released paperback edition of The Cathedral and the Bazaar, new material he added to this edition, and how he used an open source approach to updating it.
Raymond: The title of the book came from the title of the first and still best known of the three papers in it.
Raymond: There's a juicy new section on the mechanics of bazaar development that discusses communications structures and the nitty-gritty of parallel debugging and why it works so well.
opensource.oreilly.com /news/raymond_0101.html   (1983 words)

  
 Lloyd Wood's Jaundiced Eye: #1 -- An evening with Eric Raymond, NT personality
Although the material (to wit: Eric Raymond and how open source came about, primarily due to Eric Raymond) is familiar ground to anyone who has ever looked "noosphere" up in a dictionary, and the jokes, though well-timed and delivered, are predictably geeky and expected, he can hold an audience.
Raymond would have been done for; "You can't expect to win every battle" can only be used as a Get-Out-of-Answer-Free yellow card so many times, and probably wouldn't go down well with target CEOs more familiar with the adages of Sun Tzu.
Raymond shows an unusually expressive awareness of the use of body language, presumably an effect of his visible but mild cerebral palsy.
tbtf.com /jaundiced/jaundiced-1.html   (925 words)

  
 (Slightly skeptical) Annotated Collection of Quotes from Eric Raymond's Letters, Articles and Interviews
Raymond was granted 150,000 share options at a strike price of less than four cents apiece, according to SEC filings, for a value of about $32 million as of midday Friday.
Raymond is a fool for trying to distance himself from this, and a bastard for presuming that he can speak this way on behalf of the Linux community.
Raymond was the programmer behind much of the Fetchmail software and is the author of the influential paper "The Cathedral and the Bazaar," contrasting open source with proprietary development.
www.softpanorama.org /OSS/ESR_Interviews.shtml   (14927 words)

  
 Guardian Unlimited Technology | Technology | Armed, but not dangerous
Eric Raymond is the gun-toting supergeek who has the corporate moguls in his sights.
Raymond's message to software buyers is that they should use "open source" software because it's more reliable, and cheaper and easier to maintain.
Raymond thinks it's more important for software to be good than for it to be free: "if we can't win by producing the best software then we don't deserve to win any moral crusades," he says.
technology.guardian.co.uk /online/story/0,3605,321058,00.html   (1696 words)

  
 Eric Raymond: Why open source will rule - ZDNet UK Insight
Raymond is best known as the co-founder, with Bruce Perens, of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) to promote Linux and other "free" software to businesses in a language they could understand.
Raymond is also the author of The Cathedral and the Bazaar and other open-source texts.
Raymond spoke to ZDNet UK during a recent European speaking tour under the auspices of the UK and Danish Unix Users Groups.
insight.zdnet.co.uk /software/linuxunix/0,39020472,2107509,00.htm   (1818 words)

  
 Everybody loves Eric Raymond » Microsoft job offer
Also, Eric Raymond is a presumptuous egotist with an overly high opinion of himself, but that doesn’t mean he’s stupid.
Eric Hopper: I am of course talking of white supremacy as a literal term, not as a particular group or movement.
Eric Raymond is obviously a racist; much like anyone arguing with “women on average have smaller brains” is a sexist.
geekz.co.uk /lovesraymond/archive/microsoft-job-offer   (2105 words)

  
 UKKUUG: Eric Raymond
Eric holds a number of directorships, including one with VA Linux Systems, and has a history of software development project work and leadership.
Eric will talk on various aspects of the Open Source Initiative, including a brief up-to-date history, analysis of how Open Source differs to other software development paradigms, and a forward view.
Eric's current visit to Europe has been arranged at short notice primarily by UKUUG and Peter Toft who is a key organizer for LinuxForum DK.
www.ukuug.org /events/ESR_20020227.shtml   (661 words)

  
 TLC :: Hackers: Hackers' Hall of Fame   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Eric Steven Raymond is the granddaddy of today's hackers, a man who revels in living the life in all its geeky glory.
Not only is he respected for his astounding skills as a programmer, but Raymond is also valued as a fierce defender of the Open Source Movement, which is based on the premise that programmers should be able to read and modify all software source codes.
In addition to programming, Raymond is also a fan of libertarianism, neo-paganism and the right to bear arms.
tlc.discovery.com /convergence/hackers/bio/bio_13.html   (170 words)

  
 Eric_S._Raymond   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
His advocacy of Second Amendment gun rights and support for the 2003 invasion of Iraq has nettled many, but he seems to enjoy the controversy this engenders.
Raymond's supporters counter that nobody has stepped forward to fork the jargon file and then act as maintainer of the forked version.
During the summer of 2003, Raymond expounded his opinions about politics, human IQ differences [14] (http://www.ibiblio.org/esrblog/index.php?m=200311#post-129), terrorism and the Iraq war on his weblog, provoking much heated criticism.
www.apawn.com /search.php?title=Eric_S._Raymond   (1220 words)

  
 seattlepi.com Microsoft Blog: Eric Raymond on Microsoft
Eric Raymond, president of the Open Source Initiative, points to the transcript of a recent conference call in which he was quizzed about open source by Prudential Securities analyst Brent Thill and a group of Prudential Securities investors.
Eric is usually highly entertaining, but also usually highly incorrect in his predictions.
Eric's pontificating is all so much wailing at the moon, until some serious $$$ steps up to the plate to 'finance' an alternative and support the result, MS isn't going anywhere unless they make some pretty bad blunders.
blog.seattlepi.nwsource.com /microsoft/archives/001063.html   (7387 words)

  
 Finding Eric Raymond   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
This means that widely-referenced material such as The Cathedral and the Bazaar (and related essays), The Jargon File, How to Ask Smart Questions, The Art of Unix Programming, the Fetchmail home page, and other such material have suddenly disappeared from the web.
Raymond has asked Google to update their pages, to no avail.
It appears that there was some sort of dispute between Eric Raymond and the owner of the tuxedo.org domain.
www.dwheeler.com /essays/finding-raymond.html   (284 words)

  
 Eric Raymond Responds
Last week I wrote two pieces in response to Eric Raymond's Cathedral and Bazaar essay.
This evening I got a response to the first piece, I pointed him to the second piece, which I feel is more constructive.
Raymond replies to Linux on Mail Starting 2/8/98.
www.scripting.com /98/02/stories/ericRaymondResponds.html   (797 words)

  
 Armed and Dangerous » Blog Archive » Microsoft tries to recruit me   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Eric is welcome in places like IBM and so many other, which wouln’t even consider inviting Richard Stallman (with all due respect to RMS).
Eric, I have loads of respect for you and your efforts–I heard you speak at Netscape after your meeting with the execs about going open source.
Eric, you are clearly not accustomed to being approached by recruiters; otherwise, you’d appreciate the difference between a “phone screen” and a “job offer”.
esr.ibiblio.org /index.208.html   (12578 words)

  
 The Cathedral and the Bazaar by Eric S. Raymond   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The seminal "agoric systems" papers by Mark Miller and Eric Drexler, by describing the emergent properties of market-like computational ecologies, helped prepare me to think clearly about analogous phenomena in the free-software culture when Linux rubbed my nose in them five years later.
Eric Hahn, Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at Netscape, wrote me shortly afterwards as follows: "On behalf of everyone at Netscape, I want to thank you for helping us get to this point in the first place.
Eric S. Raymond is Co-Founder and Technical Director of Chester County InterLink which provides free Internet access to the residents of Chester County, Pennsylvania.
firstmonday.org /issues/issue3_3/raymond/index.html   (9625 words)

  
 IBM to enlist Eric S Raymond?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
OVER THE WEEKEND Linux and Main reported that IBM might be about to hire Eric S. Raymond as a trial consultant to assist with its defense against SCO's billion-dollar intellectual property lawsuit.
According to Raymond, IBM is interested in retaining him in his role as Unix historian.
So, Raymond will be in a much better position to contribute his knowledge of Unix to IBM's defense if he's a consultant hired by IBM.
www.theinquirer.net /?article=9536   (532 words)

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