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Topic: Esophageal cancer


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In the News (Wed 21 Aug 19)

  
  Esophageal cancer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Esophageal tumors usually lead to dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), pain and other symptoms, and is diagnosed with biopsy.
Statistically, it appears that Helicobacter pylori, known for increasing risk for gastric cancer, actually decreases the risk of esophageal cancer; the exact mechanism for this phenomenon is unclear.
Esophageal cancer is a relatively rare form of cancer, but some world areas have a markedly higher incidence than others: China, India and Japan, as well as the United Kingdom, appear to have a higher incidence, as well as the region around the Caspian Sea.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Esophageal_cancer   (1600 words)

  
 Esophageal cancer   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Cancer that begins in the esophagus (also called esophageal cancer) is divided into two major types, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, depending on the type of cells that are malignant.
Treatment for esophageal cancer depends on a number of factors, including the size, location, and extent of the tumor, and the general health of the patient.
Because cancer treatment may make the mouth sensitive and at risk for infection, doctors often advise patients with esophageal cancer to see a dentist for a dental exam and treatment before cancer treatment begins.
bopedia.com /en/wikipedia/e/es/esophageal_cancer.html   (2333 words)

  
 ESOPHAGEAL CANCER
Cancer, or a malignant tumor, is the result of uncontrolled growth of cells located in a particular region of the body.
Esophageal cancer is not nearly as common as cancers of the breast, lung, prostate, or colon.
For esophageal cancer, the common areas of spread are the lymph glands (or lymph nodes), lungs, liver, adrenal glands, kidneys, bones, and lining of the chest and abdomen.
www.sts.org /doc/4121   (1258 words)

  
 Sloan-Kettering - Esophageal Cancer
Cancer that arises from the cells that form the top layer of the esophageal lining is called squamous cell carcinoma, and accounts for about half of all cancers in the esophagus.
Esophageal cancer is cancer of the esophagus, the hollow muscular tube that carries food and liquid from your throat to your stomach to be digested.
The choice of treatment for esophageal cancer depends on the stage of the disease -- that is, how large the tumor has grown, how deeply it has invaded the layers of the esophagus, and whether it has spread to nearby organs, lymph nodes, or other parts of the body.
www.mskcc.org /mskcc/html/331.cfm   (309 words)

  
 Esophageal Cancer Screening - National Cancer Institute
Esophageal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the esophagus.
The esophagus is the hollow, muscular tube that moves food and liquid from the throat to the stomach.
Esophageal cancer starts in the inside lining of the esophagus and spreads outward through the other layers as it grows.
www.cancer.gov /cancertopics/pdq/screening/esophageal/Patient/page2   (392 words)

  
 Health Information - Yale Medical Group   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Esophageal cancer is cancer that develops in the esophagus, the muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach.
The most common type of esophageal cancer, known as adenocarcinoma, develops in the glandular tissue in the lower part of the esophagus, near the opening of the stomach.
When esophageal cancer is diagnosed, tests will be performed to determine how much cancer is present, and if the cancer has spread from the colon to other parts of the body.
ymghealthinfo.org /content.asp?pageid=P07194   (1904 words)

  
 Esophageal cancer
Esophageal cancer is a malignancy that develops in tissues of the hollow, muscular canal (esophagus) along which food and liquid travel from the throat to the stomach.
Esophageal webs, which are protrusions of tissue into the esophagus, and diverticula, which are outpouchings of the wall of the esophagus, are associated with a higher incidence of esophageal cancer.
Once a diagnosis of esophageal cancer has been confirmed through biopsy, staging tests are performed to determine whether the disease has spread (metastasized) to tissues or organs near the original tumor or in other parts of the body.
www.healthatoz.com /healthatoz/Atoz/ency/esophageal_cancer.jsp   (2046 words)

  
 Esophageal cancer
Because esophageal tumors are rarely discovered in the early stages, they often have spread to nearby lymph nodes or to other parts of your body, such as the lungs or liver, before they're diagnosed.
Surgery for esophageal cancer is complex and carries risks that include infection, bleeding and leakage from the area where the remaining esophagus is reattached.
These symptoms may be compounded by cancer treatments and by the need for a liquid diet, tube feeding or intravenous feeding during the course of your treatment as well as by the emotional toll of living with the disease.
www.cnn.com /HEALTH/library/DS/00500.html   (5487 words)

  
 Esophageal cancer
The incidence of esophageal cancer has risen in recent decades, coinciding with a shift in histologic type and primary tumor location.[1,2] Adenocarcinoma of the esophagus is now more prevalent than squamous cell carcinoma in the United States and western Europe, with most tumors located in the distal esophagus.
Esophageal cancer is a treatable disease that is rarely curable.
In patients with partial esophageal obstruction, dysphagia may, at times, be relieved by placement of an expandable metallic stent [4] or by radiation therapy if the patient has disseminated disease or is not a candidate for surgery.
www.meb.uni-bonn.de /Cancernet/100089.html   (2875 words)

  
 Esophageal Cancer:   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Esophageal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the esophagus.
Esophageal cancer is often in an advanced stage when it is ; diagnosed.
Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping the cells from dividing.
www.acor.org /cnet/62960.html   (3180 words)

  
 MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: Esophageal cancer
Esophageal cancer is a malignant tumor of the esophagus, the muscular tube that transports food from the mouth to the stomach.
Esophageal cancer is relatively uncommon in the United States, and occurs most often in men over 50 years old.
Esophageal cancer is a very difficult disease to treat, but it can be cured in patients whose disease is confined to the esophagus.
www.nlm.nih.gov /medlineplus/ency/article/000283.htm   (712 words)

  
 Esophageal Cancer - Heartburn
Esophageal cancer is when the cells in the esophagus are mutated.
The common symptoms of esophageal cancer is difficulty swallowing, pain behind the breastbone, heartburn, indigestion, coughing, hoarseness, or weight loss.
The prognosis of esophageal cancer depends on health of the patient, stage of cancer, and size of tumor.
www.bellaonline.com /articles/art35485.asp   (306 words)

  
 Esophageal Cancer:   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
One of the major difficulties in allocating and comparing treatment modalities for patients with esophageal cancer is the lack of precise preoperative staging.
Noninvasive positron emission tomography using the radiolabeled glucose analog 18-F-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose for preoperative staging of esophageal cancer is under clinical evaluation and may be useful in detecting stage IV disease.
In the presence of complete esophageal obstruction without clinical evidence of systemic metastasis, surgical excision of the tumor with mobilization of the stomach to replace the esophagus has been the traditional means of relieving the dysphagia.
www.acor.org /cnet/62741.html   (3901 words)

  
 eMedicine - Esophageal Cancer : Article by Marco Patti, MD   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The etiology of esophageal carcinoma is thought to be related to exposure of the esophageal mucosa to noxious or toxic stimuli, resulting in a sequence of dysplasia to carcinoma in situ to carcinoma.
Previous reports of induction chemotherapy in esophageal cancer often are difficult to interpret because of varying definitions of response (eg, symptomatic improvement, decrease in tumor length after barium esophagram, subjective determination of improvement at endoscopy or CT scan).
Because most esophageal cancers today are adenocarcinomas that originated from Barrett esophagus, stopping the sequence of events leading from GERD to adenocarcinoma now is possible (Image 1).
www.emedicine.com /med/topic741.htm   (5549 words)

  
 esophageal cancer : Cancer Research
Esophageal cancer is one of the fastest growing cancer in America.
Esophageal Cancer - Esophageal carcinoma was well described at the beginning of the 19th century, and the first successful resection was performed in 1913 by...
Esophageal cancer is generally asymptomatic until swallowing difficulty (known as...
www.breeamcanada.ca /?Top=esophageal+cancer   (750 words)

  
 Esophageal Cancer Treatment and Symptoms
The two most common forms of esophageal cancer are named for the type of cells that become malignant (cancerous): Squamous cell carcinoma: Cancer that forms in squamous cells, the thin, flat cells lining the esophagus.
Esophageal cancer is cancer of the esophagus, the muscular tube through which food passes from the throat to the stomach.
Recurrent esophageal cancer is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated.
goldbamboo.com /topic-t1314.html   (809 words)

  
 Esophageal Cancer
Cancer of esophagus (also called esophageal cancer) is divided into two major types, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, depending on the type of cells that are malignant.
Conventional esophageal cancer treatment can be generally categorized in four kinds, surgery, radiation, chemotherapy and immunotherapy.
It is of high efficiency in killing cancer cells, boosting immunity and thus reducing cancer body, inhibiting cancer growth and metastasis, alleviating clinical symptoms and pain, prolonging life expectancy and improving life quality.
www.4uherb.com /cancer/esophagus/treat.htm   (512 words)

  
 Esophageal Cancer Treatments
There are occasional rare cancers found in the esophagus, such as "sarcomas" which arise from the muscular wall, "cylindroma" which begins from glands, and "lymphoma" that starts from the body's immune system cells within the esophagus.
It Accounts for 5% of Gastrointestinal cancers and about 1% of all new cancers in the U.S.A. The overall number of cases each year is steadily increasing.
We invite you to read our review on Esophageal cancer so that you will be armed with comprehensive, trustworthy information that may help you or someone you care about who has been diagnosed with Esophageal cancer.
www.cancergroup.com /em8.html   (466 words)

  
 Esophageal Cancer, The Cancer Information Network
Esophageal cancer is 40 times for likely to develop in patients with B
High-energy radiation can be utilized to definitively treat esophageal cancer or provide palliation for symptoms caused by the malignancy.
Palliative Therapy for Esophageal Cancer - Non curative treatment to alleviate the symptoms caused by esophageal cancer.
www.cancerlinksusa.com /esophageal.htm   (393 words)

  
 Esophageal Cancer - Overview - oncologychannel
Esophageal cancer usually originates in the lining of the esophagus (called the mucosa) and can develop in the upper, middle, or lower section of the organ.
The most common types of esophageal cancer are squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma.
According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), esophageal cancer is the third most common cancer of the digestive tract and the seventh leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide.
www.oncologychannel.com /esophagealcancer   (343 words)

  
 Esophageal Cancer News
Cancer Treatment News provides summaries of new treatment strategies as they are discovered and reported by cancer physicians around the world.
According to an article recently published in the journal Cancer, consumption of carbonated soft drinks is not associated with an increased risk of developing esophageal cancer.
Survival after surgery for esophageal cancer improved significantly between 1987 and 2000, according to the results of a study published in the journal Lancet Oncology.
patient.cancerconsultants.com /esophageal_cancer_news.aspx   (1236 words)

  
 Esophageal Cancer
[16] Noninvasive positron emission tomography using the radiolabeled glucose analog 18-F-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose for preoperative staging of esophageal cancer is under clinical evaluation and may be useful in detecting stage IV disease.
Once symptoms are present (e.g., dysphagia, in most cases), esophageal cancers have usually invaded the muscularis propria or beyond and may have metastasized to lymph nodes or other organs.
[5] In patients with partial esophageal obstruction, dysphagia may, at times, be relieved by placement of an expandable metallic stent [6] or by radiation therapy if the patient has disseminated disease or is not a candidate for surgery.
www.meb.uni-bonn.de /cancer.gov/CDR0000062741.html   (3898 words)

  
 Esophageal Cancer | Resources about Esophageal Cancer   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, may significantly reduce the risk of esophageal cancer among people with Barrett's esophagus, a premalignant condition associated with chronic heartburn that affects an estimated 1 million to 2 million Americans.......
Esophageal Cancer Resources This list includes resources you're likely to use most often and those that are the richest sources of specific information on esophageal cancer.
Esophageal Cancer Treatment Esophageal Cancer Treatment Esophageal Cancer The esophagus links the mouth to the stomach, forming an important part of the body's digestive system.
www.decancer.com /esophagealcancer   (380 words)

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