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Topic: Essive case


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 CONK! Encyclopedia: Accusative_case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The accusative case of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a verb.
"Whom" is the accusative case of "who"; "him" is the accusative case of "he" (the final "m" of both of these words can be traced back to the Proto-Indo-European accusative case suffix); and "her" is the accusative case of "she".
This is the form in nominative case, used for the subject of a sentence.
www.conk.com /search/encyclopedia.cgi?q=Accusative_case   (500 words)

  
 Vocative case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The vocative case is the case used for a noun identifying the person being addressed, found in Latin among other languages.
In Latin, e.g., the nominative case is lupus and the vocative case is lupe!
In English the vocative case is not marked, but English syntax performs a similar function; witness: "John, could you come here?" or "I don't think so, John", where "John" is neither subject nor object of the verb, but rather indicates the person to whom the statement is being addressed.
www.secaucus.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Vocative_case   (936 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Vocative case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The vocative case is the case used for a noun identifying the person (animal, object, etc.) being addressed and/or occasionally the determiners of that noun.
This declension (case) indicates a change in state of a noun, with the general sense of becoming X or change to X. In the Finnish language, this is the counterpart of the Essive case, with the basic meaning of a change of state.
The vocative case in Romanian is inherited from Latin.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Vocative-case   (2907 words)

  
 Declension - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The patient of a (transitive) verb is in the accusative case.
The trigger may be identified as the agent, patient, etc. Other nouns may be inflected for case, but the inflections are overloaded; for example, in Tagalog, the subject and object of a verb are both expressed in the genitive case when they are not in the trigger case.
The Status of Morphological Case in the Icelandic Lexicon (http://www.hi.is/~eirikur/cases.pdf) by Eiríkur Rögnvaldsson.
www.secaucus.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Declension   (535 words)

  
 Genitive case - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The genitive case is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun.
In some languages, nouns in the genitive case also agree in case with the nouns they modify (that is, the head noun is marked for two cases).
Linguists generally believe that English possessive is no longer a case at all, but has become a clitic, an independent particle which, however, is always written and pronounced as part of the preceding word.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia?title=Genitive&redirect=no   (567 words)

  
 Oblique case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
casus generalis) is a noun case of analytic languages that is used generally when a noun is the predicate of a sentence or a preposition.
An oblique case can appear in any case relationship except the nominative case of a sentence subject or the vocative case of direct address.
In ergative-absolutive languages, the absolutive case is used for a direct object (the subject will then be in the ergative case); but the absolutive case is also used for the subject of an intransitive verb, where the subject is being passively described, rather than performing an action.
www.tocatch.info /en/Oblique_case.htm   (319 words)

  
 Instrumental case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
In linguistics, the instrumental case indicates that a noun is the instrument or means by which the subject achieves or accomplishes an action.
The instrumental case appears in Old English, Georgian, Sanskrit, and the Balto-Slavic languages.
An instrumental/comitative case is arguably present in Turkish and other Altaic languages.
hartselle.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Instrumental_case   (168 words)

  
 Locative case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The locative case belongs to the general local cases together with the lative and case.
In the Finnish grammar, the locative is included in the essive case.
In the Hungarian language, nine such cases exist, yet the name locative case refers to a form (-t/-tt) used only in a few city/town names along with the Inessive case or Superessive case.
pineville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Locative_case   (342 words)

  
 Essive case -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The essive or similaris (A portable container for carrying several objects) case carries the meaning of a temporary state of being, often equivalent to the English "as a...".
In the (Click link for more info and facts about Finnish language) Finnish language, this case is marked by adding "-na/-nä" to the genitive stem of the noun, but with strong (Click link for more info and facts about consonant gradation) consonant gradation.
Some expressions use the essive in the ancient (The semantic role of the noun phrase that designates the place of the state or action denoted by the verb) locative meaning, e.g.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/e/es/essive_case.htm   (183 words)

  
 Partitive case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The partitive case is a grammatical case which denotes "partialness", "without result", or "without specific identity".
In the Finnish language, this case is often used to express unknown identities and actions.
The case with an unspecified identity is onko teillä kirjoja, which uses the partitive, because it refers to unspecified books, as contrasted to accusative onko teillä (ne) kirjat?
www.sevenhills.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Partitive_case   (382 words)

  
 Articles - Allative case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
In the Finnish language, the Allative case is the fifth of the locative cases, with the basic meaning of "onto".
In addition, it is the logical complement of the adessive case for referring to "being around the place".
The term allative is generally used for the lative case in the majority of languages which do not make finer distinctions.
www.motionize.com /articles/Allative_case   (109 words)

  
 Ablative case - Biocrawler definition:Ablative case - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
In linguistics, the ablative case is a noun case found in several languages, including Armenian, Latin, Sanskrit and in the Finno-Ugric languages.
In Finnish, the ablative case is the sixth of the locative cases with the meaning "from off of", e.g.
It is an outer locative case, used just as the adessive and allative cases to denote both being on top of something and "being around the place" (as opposed to the inner locative case, the elative, which means "from out of" or "from the inside of").
www.biocrawler.com /biowiki/Ablative_case   (263 words)

  
 Information on Vocative case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
In Latin the vocative case of a noun is the same as the Nominative case, except for masculine singular second declension nouns that have the ending -us in the nominative case.
In Latin, e.g., the nominative case is lupus and the vocative case is lupe!, whereas the accusative case is lupum.
In English language the vocative case is not marked, but English syntax performs a similar function; witness: "John, could you come here?" or "I don't think so, John", where "John" is neither subject nor object of the verb, but rather indicates the person to whom the statement is being addressed.
www.information-resource.net /search/Vocative_case.html   (1119 words)

  
 Dative case - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The dative case is a grammatical case for nouns and/or pronouns.
While the dative case is no longer a part of modern English usage, it survives in a few set expressions.
The pronoun whom is also a remnant of the dative case in English, descending from the Old English dative pronoun "hwām" (as opposed to the nominative "who", which descends from Old English "hwā") — though "whom" also absorbed the functions of the Old English accusative pronoun "hwone".
open-encyclopedia.com /Dative_case   (334 words)

  
 Distributive case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
This case in Hungarian language can express the manner when something happens to each member of a set one by one (eg.
"per head", "in each case"), or the frequency in time ("once a week", "every ten minutes").
In Finnish, this case is rare and even rarer in singular.
www.kernersville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Distributive_case   (200 words)

  
 Articles - Finnish language noun cases   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The basic meaning of this case is a lack of telicity, that is, it is not indicated whether the intended result has been achieved.
This is the counterpart of the essive, with the basic meaning of a change of state.
The prolative is not considered to be a case in the official grammar.
www.shreka.com /articles/Finnish_language_noun_cases   (1381 words)

  
 Dative case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The dative case is a grammatical case generally used to indicate the noun to whom something is given.
In Georgian, the dative case also marks the subject of the sentence in some verbs and some tenses.
The Old English language, current until approximately the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066, had a dative case; however, the English case system gradually fell into disuse during the Middle English period, when the accusative and dative pronouns merged into a single objective pronoun used in both roles.
en.letsrock.ch /wiki/Dative   (661 words)

  
 Read about Accusative case at WorldVillage Encyclopedia. Research Accusative case and learn about Accusative case here!   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a verb.
The same case is used in many languages for the objects of (some or all)
nominative case, used for the subject of a sentence.
encyclopedia.worldvillage.com /s/b/Accusative_case   (330 words)

  
 Grammar | Nouns
The allative case shows a noun phrase that is semantically the goal, physical or otherwise, of an action or movement.
This case is often applied on a small set of 'nouns of location', such as or and lar, and is often irregular.
The commitative case is used to mark a noun phrase as a semantic companion to the master NP, either in a peer-to-peer relationship (thus acting like a conjunction, 'and') or in a main-to-accesory relationship (like English 'with').
www.angelfire.com /scifi2/nyh/bokuchi/lng/nouns.html   (1316 words)

  
 Information on Genitive case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The genitive case is a Grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of Possession (linguistics), between the Noun in the genitive case and another noun.
It is a common misconception that English language nouns have a genitive case, marked by the possessive -'s ending.
Linguistics generally believe that English possessive is no longer a case at all, but has become a Clitic, an independent Grammatical particle which, however, is always pronounced as part of the preceding word.
www.information-resource.net /search/Genitive.html   (642 words)

  
 Articles - Objective (grammar)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Several relatively common usages of objective pronouns in the subject position are regarded as errors by prescriptive grammarians, though descriptive grammarians class such usages as dialect and a natural part of language evolution.
Also, using the objective pronoun for the second word in a comparison using the conjunction than is traditionally considered incorrect if a subjective pronoun would be necessary in the "full" form of the sentence.
Who is commonly being used for both the objective and nominative cases, similar to the word you.
www.cateringa.com /articles/Objective_pronoun   (394 words)

  
 Nominative case - All About All   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Some writers on English use the term subjective case instead of nominative, in order to draw attention to the differences between the "standard" generic nominative and the way it is used in English.
A special case is the word you: Originally ye was its nominative form and you the accusative, but over time you has come to be used for the nominative as well.
In nominative-absolutive languages, the nominative case marks the subject of a transitive verb or a voluntary subject of an intransitive verb, but not an involuntary subject of an intransitive verb (for which the absolutive case is used).
www.allaboutall.info /article/Nominative_case   (338 words)

  
 Genitive case
The genitive case is an adjectival form of a noun that shows some sort of relationship between itself and what it describes.
In a general sense, this genitive relationship may be thought of as one thing belonging to, being created from, or otherwise deriving from some other thing.
In some languages, genitive nouns agree in case with the nouns they modify.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/g/ge/genitive_case.html   (440 words)

  
 Possessive case - All About All   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Possessive case is a grammatical case that exists in some languages and is used to indicate a relationship of possession.
It is not the same as the genitive case, though the two have similar meanings in many languages.
The term "possessive case" is often used to refer to the "'s" morpheme, which is suffixed onto many nouns in English to denote possession.
www.emypedia.com /article/Possessive_case   (191 words)

  
 List of grammatical cases   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Causal case because, because of because of the house Quechua-language
Instrumental case/Instructive case marking the usage by means of the house Czech language Finnish language Lithuanian language Russian language Sanskrit language Serbian language (in Serbian, Instrumental case and Sociative case are one case, common name is Instrumental, Instrumental is used without preposition, Sociative is used with preposition with)
Objective case direct or indirect object of verb or object of preposition, a catch-all case for any situation except nominative or genitive I saw her, I gave her the book, with her.
read-and-go.hopto.org /Grammatical-cases/List-of-grammatical-cases.html   (946 words)

  
 Articles - Distributive-temporal case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
This case in Hungarian language can express how often something happens (eg.
The temporal distributive case specifies when something is done, in contrast to the distributive case, which is specifies how often something is done, as in regular maintenance.
If the plural has another form than -i-, either joka (each) or the essive case is used.
www.shreka.com /articles/Distributive-temporal_case   (209 words)

  
 LITUANUS. Vol. 27, No. 1 - Spring 1981
On the other hand, if it is argued that Essive is not a deep case, then we must assign the correct deep case label, and we are back to having more than one instance of a particular deep case in a simple sentence.
Tang (1972:89) extends the notion of the Essive, whose semantic function in the Chinese predicate nominal is simply that of identifying or qualifying the party designated by the subject NP, so that it may be associated with what are called by Chao (1968:711-716) "classificatory verbs," as exemplified in (8)-(11).
In this case frame, the first nominal element with the Object case is assigned to the subject of the sentence representing the person or thing which undergoes the change; the second nominal element serves as the predicate nominal which specifies the result.
www.lituanus.org /1981_1/81_1_02.htm   (3481 words)

  
 iqexpand.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The translative case is used to show something is becoming this noun.
Translative case Vocative case Declension Edit this box The dative case is a grammatical case for nouns and/or pronouns.
Translative case Vocative case Declension Edit this box The nominative case is a grammatical case for a noun.
translative_case.iqexpand.com   (323 words)

  
 Articles - Adverbial case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The adverbial case is a noun case in the Abkhaz language and Georgian language that has a function similar to the translative and essive cases.
The adverbial case also act as the essive case, as in:
The adverbial case is also employed when stating the name of a language:
www.winacea.com /articles/Adverbial_case   (100 words)

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