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Topic: Eubalaena


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  Right whale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In dealing with the three populations of Eubalaena right whales, authorities have historically disagreed over whether to categorize the three populations in one, two or three species.
Halibalaena (Gray, 1873) and Hunterius (Gray, 1866) are junior synonyms for the genus Eubalaena.
Today, the three Eubalaena species inhabit three distinct areas of the globe: the Atlantic Northern in the western Atlantic Ocean, the Pacific Northern in a band from Japan to Alaska and the Southern in all areas of the Southern Ocean.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Eubalaena   (3789 words)

  
 Right Whales
Its generic name, Eubalaena, is derived from the Greek eu, meaning "well or true" and balaena, meaning "whale".
The North Atlantic right whale is named Eubalaena glacialis, and lives in the temperate and sub-arctic waters of the North Atlantic Ocean.
The North Pacific right whale is named Eubalaena japonica, the word japonica referring to the waters surrounding Japan, which are within its North Pacific range.
www2.canisius.edu /~noonan/cac_marine_mammals/right_whales.htm   (535 words)

  
 EPA: Federal Register: Endangered Fish and Wildlife; Notice of Technical Revision to Right Whale Nomenclature and ...
The first change updates the formerly- used genus Balaena to the genus Eubalaena to conform to the taxonomy currently accepted by the scientific community and supported by the scientific literature.
Eubalaena is also the name accepted by both the International Whaling Commission (IWC) and NMFS.
Historically, right whales were classified as two distinct species, Eubalaena glacialis in the northern hemisphere (Pacific and Atlantic Ocean basins) and Eubalaena australis in the southern hemisphere, based on a morphological difference in the orbital region of the skull (Muller, 1954; Rosenbaum et al., 2000).
www.epa.gov /fedrgstr/EPA-SPECIES/2003/April/Day-10/e8683.htm   (1954 words)

  
 Eubalaena australis, Southern Right Whale at MarineBio.org
Southern Right whales, Eubalaena australis (Desmoulins, 1822), are characterized by their uniformly dark color and white callosities found on and around the head.
The largest of these excrescences (callosities) is located on the anterior-most portion of the head and is referred to as the "bonnet." Other excrescences are on the upper edge of the lower jaw, behind the blowhole, and above the eye.
Eubalaena australis is on average between 16-18 m long at maturity, males being slightly shorter than females.
www.marinebio.com /species.asp?id=166   (1127 words)

  
 Species Corner: Right Whale   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
The northern species of the right whale, Eubalaena glacialis, teeters on the brink of extinction despite being protected by the International Whaling Commission since 1937.
Whaling decimated populations in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
Northern and southern populations are isolated from one another by the tropics.
www.tmmsn.org /mmgulf/eubalaena.html   (434 words)

  
 Northern Right Whale (Eubalaena glacialis) Whales, Right Whales, Baleen.
These callosities are easily spotted when the whale comes to the surface to breath especially since they also often raise their chin or entire head during social contacts with other whales.
Some speculate that Northern Right Whales can be distinguished from the Southern Right Whale (Eubalaena australis) by a larger amount of callosity material on the head and less on the edge of the lower lip.
However variety in callosity material and colouration between individuals, groups and populations make such observations unreliable and redundant when their geographic seperation by the equator is considered.
www.marinethemes.com /northright.html   (773 words)

  
 Vol. FY03, No. 3: Right Whale Technical Update   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
The first change updates the formerly-used genus Balaena to the genus Eubalaena to conform to the taxonomy currently accepted by the scientific community and supported by the scientific literature.
The right whale was initially listed as Eubalaena glacialis by the Fish and Wildlife Service in the 1973 Edition of Threatened Wildlife of the United States.
Eubalaena is also the name accepted by both the International Whaling Commission and NMFS.
meso.spawar.navy.mil /Newsltr/Fy03/No_3/right_whale.html   (329 words)

  
 Eubalaena glacialis, Northern Right Whale at MarineBio.org
The Northern Right whale, Eubalaena glacialis (Müller, 1776), aka Black Right whale or Biscayan Right whale, is similar is shape to the Bowhead, being large and stocky, but slightly smaller.
A particular favorite is 'sailing', where the whale hangs vertically upside-down in the water, 'standing' on its head, with its tail flukes in the air.
The Northern Right Whale was classified along with the closely-related Southern Right whale, Eubalaena australis under the genus Eubalaena, which literally means 'right whale', referring to the belief that these were the 'right' whales to kill.
marinebio.org /species.asp?id=191   (874 words)

  
 Ocean Alliance - WHALE CONSERVATION INSTITUTE - Right Whale Program
External features in southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) and their use in identifying individuals.
Thomas, P.O. Kelp gulls, Larus dominicanus, are parasitic on flesh of the right whale, Eubalaena australis.
Changing patterns of habitat use by southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) on their nursery ground at Peninsula Valdes, Argentina, and in their long-range movements.
www.oceanalliance.org /wci/wci_rwpublications.html   (572 words)

  
 Selective Bibliography of Scientific Literature on the North Pacific Right Whale (Eubalaena glacialis)
Scarff, J.E. Preliminary estimates of whaling-induced mortality in the 19th century Pacific northern right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) fishery, adjusting for struck-but-lost whales and non-American whaling.
Scarff, J.E. Historic distribution and abundance of the right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) in the North Pacific, Bering Sea, Sea of Okhotsk and Sea of Japan from the Maury Whale Charts.
Scarff, J.E. Historic and present distribution of the right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) in the Eastern North Pacific South of 50° North and East of 180° West.
www.sfcelticmusic.com /js/RTWHALES/sciliterature.htm   (688 words)

  
 EPA: Federal Register: Endangered Marine and Anadromous Species; Final Rule to Remove Technical Revisions to Right ...
The intent of replacing the genus Balaena with Eubalaena was to correct the genus name in the FWS listing, a technical change.
The intent of changing the listing from one northern right whale species to two species North Pacific right whale and North Atlantic right whale was to recognize the best available scientific information, which indicated that the population in the North Atlantic was genetically distinct from the population in the North Pacific.
We did not make the same change to 50 CFR 224.101(b) because we believed that ``Right whales (Eubalaena spp)'' would already include any species that is subsequently recognized within the same genus.
www.epa.gov /fedrgstr/EPA-SPECIES/2005/January/Day-11/e527.htm   (1335 words)

  
 Calls recorded from North Pacific right whales (Eubalaena japonica) in the eastern Bering Sea   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Calls from North Pacific right whales (Eubalaena japonica) were recorded in the eastern Bering Sea during a visual and acoustic survey aboard the US Coast Guard buoy tender Sweetbrier, in July 1999.
Two call types are described as ‘down’ and ‘constant’ calls, based upon nomenclature established for southern right whales (Eubalaena australis).
Clark, 1982; 1983), there are only a few descriptions of calls for the North Atlantic species (Eubalaena glacialis; e.g.
nmml.afsc.noaa.gov /CetaceanAssessment/right/right.htm   (4322 words)

  
 RIGHT WHALE
The number of species of right whales is in dispute; most biologists believe there are two species, Eubalaena glacialis, the northern right whale, and Eubalaena australis, the southern species.
Some believe that right whales from the north Pacific should be considered a third species, Eubalaena japonica.
The right whales are probably an example of a species that is in the process of diverging into separate species after prolonged separation across the globe.
www.zoomdinosaurs.com /subjects/whales/species/Rightwhale.shtml   (819 words)

  
 Discovering Whales - The Right Whale
All seven neck vertabrae are fixed into a single unit to support the enormous body weight.
Most authorities recognise two species of the genus Eubalaena (Eubalaena australis and Eubalaena glacialis) but recently the animals in the North Pacific have been proposed as a third (Eubalaena japonica).
Minor cranial differences and more callosites on top of the 'lower lip' and less on top of the head of the Southern Right whale separate the southern and northern species.
www.omplace.com /omsites/discover/RIGHT   (116 words)

  
 The North Pacific Right Whale (Eubalaena glacialis) - the World's Most Endangered Whale
Taxonomically, the right whale "family", Balaenidae, consist of the right whales (Eubalaena spp.), the bowhead whale of the high Arctic (Balaena mysticetus), and the poorly known pygmy right whale of the Southern Hemisphere ().
However, recent genetic studies have caused scientists to conclude that the populations of right whales living in the North Atlantic, Southern Hemisphere and North Pacific are three distinct species.
The North Atlantic whales are referred to as Eubalaena glacialis; the Southern Hemisphere right whales have been named E.
www.sfcelticmusic.com /js/RTWHALES/nprightw.htm   (2674 words)

  
 Right Whale Bibliography via WhaleNet
Records of the souther right whale, Eubalaena australis (Desmoulins, 1982), from Chile between 1976 and 1982.
Stable isotopes in southern right whale (Eubalaena australis) baleen as indicators of seasonal movement, feeding and growth.
Scarff, J.E. Historic and present distribution of the right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) in the eastern North pacific south of 500 N and east of 1800 W. Report of the International Whaling Commission Special Issue 10:43-63.
whale.wheelock.edu /whalenet-stuff/rw_bib.html   (2025 words)

  
 Special Issue 2
J.E. Scarff - Preliminary estimates of whaling-induced mortality in the 19th century North Pacific right whale (Eubalaena japonicus) fishery, adjusting for struck-but-lost whales and non-American whaling.
They were the ‘right’ whales to catch because they were slow swimming, floated when dead and yielded great quantities of valuable oil and baleen.
to retain the generic name Eubalaena for right whales and to recognise the three species E. glacialis, the North Atlantic right whale, E. australis, the southern right whale, and E. japonica, the North Pacific right whale.
www.iwcoffice.org /Publications/journalspec02.htm   (2187 words)

  
 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: Eubalaena glacialis
North Atlantic and North Pacific stocks of right whales were designated EN in the 1996 Red List, and therefore this status can sensibly be "transferred" to the two species, E.
Recent evidence of decreased survival and reproductive rates indicates that the population may be declining (Caswell et al.
This assessement was previously in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species under the name Eubalaena glacialis North Atlantic stock.
www.iucnredlist.org /search/details.php/41712/all   (748 words)

  
 North Atlantic Right Whale Catalog: Other Right Whale Resources
Hamilton, P.K. and Mayo, C.A. Population characteristics of right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) observed in Cape Cod and Massachusetts Bays, 1978-1986.
Two-way trans-Atlantic migration of a North Atlanticright whale (Eubalaena glacialis).
Migration and calving of right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) in the western North Atlantic.
www.neaq.org /rwcatalog/resources/publications.html   (1114 words)

  
 FIGIS - FAO/SIDP Species Identification Sheet: Eubalaena australis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
FIGIS - FAO/SIDP Species Identification Sheet: Eubalaena australis
Eubalaena australis Species Identification and Data Programme - SIDP FIGIS Species Fact Sheets FAO - FIGIS
Despite the threats from whaling, entanglement in fishing gear, vessel collisions, and habitat destruction, some southern right whale populations have shown recent signs of recovery.
www.fao.org /figis/servlet/species?sname=Eubalaena+australis   (655 words)

  
 American Cetacean Society
It has recently been proposed that Right Whales (Eubalaena sp.) be divided into three taxonomic units consisting of the southern right whale (Eubalaena australis), which has a circumpolar distribution in the Southern Hemisphere, the North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis), and the North Pacific right whale (Eubalaena japonica).
These classifications are based on discrete patterns of genetic variation in the mitochondrial DNA, as there is little morphological evidence to distinguish the three groups using a classical systematics approach.
In order to contribute additional data to an assessment of species relationships and designations within Eubalaena, we have tested numerous nuclear DNA gene regions for their utility and informativeness at the population/species boundary.
www.acsonline.org /conference/culture2002/posters/gaines.html   (363 words)

  
 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: Eubalaena japonica
Large unreported kills by Soviet whalers in the 1950s and 1960s may have destroyed any chance of the Right Whale's recovery in the eastern and central North Pacific (Brownell et al.
This species assessment was previously in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species under the name Eubalaena glacialis North Pacific stock.
Scarff, J.E. Preliminary estimates of whaling-induced mortality in the 19th century North Pacific Right Whale (Eubalaena japonicus) fishery, adjusting for struck-but-lost whales and non-American whaling.
www.iucnredlist.org /search/details.php/41711/all   (696 words)

  
 North Atlantic Right Whale - References   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Kraus, S. Rates and potential causes of mortality in North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis).
Application of remote sensing methods for tracking large cetaceans: North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis).
Assessment of the population structure of the western North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) based on sighting and mtDNA data.
biology.usgs.gov /s+t/SNT/noframe/mr183r.htm   (175 words)

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