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Topic: Euboean Greek


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In the News (Wed 22 May 19)

  
 Ancient Scripts: Greek
The Greeks were the first Europeans to learn to write with an alphabet, and from them writing was brought to the rest of Europe, eventually leading down to all modern European alphabets.
From the shape of the letters, it is clear that the Greeks adopted the alphabet the Phoenician script, mostly like during the late 9th century BCE.
Eventually the Ionian alphabet was adopted in all Greek-speaking states, but before that happened, the Euboean variant was carried to the Italic peninsula and adopted by Etruscan and eventually the Romans.
www.ancientscripts.com /greek.html   (489 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
Cumae (: Cuma, : Κύμη or Κύμαι) is an ancient Greek settlement lying to the northwest of Naples in the Italian region of Campania.
The settlement is believed to have been founded in the 8th century BC by Greeks from the city of Cuma and Chalkis in Euboea led by the oecist (colonizer) Hippocles, upon the earlier dwellings of indigenous, Iron-Age peoples whom they supplanted.
Cumae was the first Greek colony on the mainland of Italy (Magna Graecia), there having been earlier starts on the islands of Ischia and Sicily by colonists from the Euboean cities of Chalcis (Χαλκίς) and possibly Eretria (Ερέτρια) or Cuma (Kύμη).
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Cumae   (426 words)

  
 The Western Greeks: Information sheet
The purpose of this visit is to enable you to familiarise yourself with some aspects of the material culture of the Greek colonies of the western Mediterranean and in particular, to give you the opportunity to examine ancient artefacts for yourself.
Producers of western Greek Red Figure: Styles include Apulian, Campanian and Lucanian RF; Campanian and Lucanian ware continues to be produced even after the conquest of most of these regions by non-Greeks.
This applies equally to Greek and Italic temples, although the form of Italic temples differs from that of Greek examples.
www.ncl.ac.uk /shefton-museum/cah305info.html   (989 words)

  
  Greek Alphabet to Latin Alphabet
The Etruscans adopted the Greek alphabet from Greek colonies at Pithekoussai (on the island of Ischia) and Cumae.
These Greek colonists were from Euboea and thus used their own local version of the Greek alphabet at the time they colonized Italy.
The Greeks used the Semitic waw in two places: for digamma, which has the consonant sound of English w, and in upsilon, where it originally had the sound of oo in "moon".
www.geocities.com /ctesibos/alphabet/grk2lat.html   (364 words)

  
  Cumae - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
Cumae (Cuma, in Italian) is an ancient Greek settlement lying to the northwest of Naples in the Italian region of Campania.
The settlement is believed to have been founded in the 8th century BC by Greeks from the city of Cuma and Chalkis in Euboea upon the earlier dwellings of indigenous, Iron-Age peoples whom they supplanted.
Cumae was the first Greek colony on the mainland of Italy (Magna Graecia), there having been earlier starts on the islands of Ischia and Sicily by colonists from the Euboean cities of Chalcis (Χαλκίς) and possibly Eretria (Ερέτρια) or Cuma (Kύμη).
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Cumae   (447 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Old Italic alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The alphabets derive from Euboean Greek Cumaean alphabet, used at Ischia and Cumae in the Bay of Naples in the eighth century BC.
It is not clear whether the process of adaptation from the Greek alphabet took place in Italy from the first colony of Greeks, the city of Cumae, or in Greece/Asia Minor.
It is generally held that the Latins adopted the western variant of the Greek alphabet in the 7th century BC from Cumae, a Greek colony in southern Italy.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Old-Italic-alphabet   (3077 words)

  
 Phoenician influence on Greek Religion 900-600 BC: The Oriental influences seen in the Gods and Goddesses worshipped in ...
The Greeks used holocausts in connection with their cults of the dead; to the Chthonic god Zeus Polieus a piglet was first burnt, then a bull slaughtered, a sequence familiar among the Semites.
Bronze Age Greeks may have practised human sacrifice, as it is alluded to in Homer, as seen in Agamemnon"s sacrifice of Iphigeneia to Artemis and the substitution of a deer at the last minute.
Greek temples were a visual display of the power and influence of an individual city and its ability to construct monuments to its gods.
phoenicia.org /greek.html   (10321 words)

  
 Cumae - The real meaning from Timesharetalk wikipedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Cumae (Cuma, in Italian) is an ancient Greek settlement lying to the northwest of Naples in the Italian region of Campania.
The settlement is believed to have been founded in the 8th century BC by Greeks from the city of Cuma and Chalkis in Euboea upon the earlier dwellings of indigenous, Iron-Age peoples whom they supplanted.
Cumae was the first Greek colony on the mainland of Italy (Magna Graecia), there having been earlier starts on the islands of Ischia and Sicily by colonists from the Euboean cities of Chalcis (?a????) and possibly Eretria (???t??a) or Cuma (K?µ?).
www.timesharetalk.co.uk /wiki.asp?k=Cumae   (435 words)

  
 EncycloWine: Encyclopedia for Wine Enthusiasts - Greek wine
Greek wine has been made since at least 1600 B.C. In ancient times, as trade in wine became extensive, it was transported from end to end of the Mediterranean; Greek wine had especially high prestige in Italy under the Roman Empire.
Classical Greek literature tells of the wines that were most highly prized, while archaeological studies of the amphoras in which wine was transported tell us of the wines that were most widely marketed.
The Wine Greek named in English and other sources did not come from Greece; it was produced in southern Italy in imitation of the strong, sweet wines for which Greece was best known.
www.encyclowine.org /index.php/Greek_wine   (593 words)

  
 Cumae
The settlement is believed to have been founded in the 8th century BCE by Greeks from the city of Cuma and Chalkis in Euboea upon the earlier dwellings of indigenous, Iron-Age peoples whom they supplanted.
There is also a small, modern Greek Euboean city called Kyme (Kύμη) as well as an excavated ancient Greek city of Cuma, the source point for the Cumae alphabet.
Cumae was the first Greek colony on the mainland of Italy (Magna Graecia), there having been earlier starts on the islands of Ischia and Sicily by colonists from the Euboean cities of Chalcis (Χαλκίς;) and possibly Eretria (Ερέτρια;) or Cuma (Kύμη).
www.ufaqs.com /wiki/en/cu/Cumae.htm   (415 words)

  
 Ancient Greece
Early Bronze Age as Greeks because their cultural traditions were very different from those of the people who eventually became known by that name.
Greek cultural values depended on the spirit of male competition (unlike in Egypt, for example, where cooperation was the highest social value), and these values permeate the stories they told.
Greek myths reflect the society in which they were transmitted, and to understand them we need to understand something about the social life of Ancient Greece.
www.professorpage.info /greece.htm   (3638 words)

  
 The Persian Invasion of Greece - (CAIS) ©
Xerxes finally began his attack on the fifth day, but was repulsed by the Greek Hoplites due to their superior training, armour, and equipment, giving them a superiority in the close confines of the pass over his lighter armed and equipped troops.
On September 22, 480BCE, the Greek fleet held a position between the north coast of the Island of Salamis and the coast of Attica to the northwest of Piraeus.
The Persians had cut the Greek supply routes through Mount Citherae, and it was now clear that Mardonius was content to pursue a policy of attrition against the Greeks, which might succeed if Pausanius did not manage to reestablish a route of supply and bring in provision for his troops.
www.cais-soas.com /CAIS/History/hakhamaneshian/greece_invasion.htm   (4127 words)

  
 Orality literacy, and the tradition Modern Age - Find Articles
A Euboean Greek of the early eighth century B.C., the adapter, in Powell's words, "took from a Phoenician informant an abecedarium and created from it his own system" of writing.' The adapter learned from his informant that each regular stipple of the Phoenician consonantal alphabet represented a particular recurrent syllable of the Phoenician language.
Greek writing had to do with aesthetic judgment and thus, however primitively, with a concept of criticism, features that distinguish it sharply from previous graphic systems.
The kings of the Greek Bronze Age counted scribes among their servants, but here too the application was restricted to terse summaries of the palace store s and brief orders to the soldiery.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m0354/is_2_45/ai_105401832   (894 words)

  
 Upto11.net - Wikipedia Article for Cumae
The settlement is believed to have been founded in the 8th century BCE by Greeks from the city of Cuma and Chalkis in Euboea upon the earlier dwellings of indigenous, Iron-Age peoples who they supplanted.
There is also a small, modern Greek Euboean city called Kyme (Kand#973;and#956;and#951;) as well as an excavated ancient Greek city of Cuma, the source point for the Cumae alphabet.
Cumae was the first Greek colony on the mainland of Italy (Magna Graecia), there having been earlier starts on the islands of Ischia and Sicily by colonists from the Euboean cities of Chalcis (and#935;and#945;and#955;and#954;and#943;and#962;) and possibly Eretria (and#917;and#961;and#941;and#964;and#961;and#953;and#945;) or Cuma (Kand#973;and#956;and#951;).
www.upto11.net /generic_wiki.php?q=cumae   (404 words)

  
 Blue Corn Comics -- Greek Lies, Historic Truth
Their dominance in the west was a consequence that the greeks dominated in the east...
It is a modern myth that the greeks could not navigate if the could not see the coast...
The Greeks' alleged dominance was circumscribed by geography; it involved the aforementioned shore-hugging and island-hopping.
www.bluecorncomics.com /greekli4.htm   (1498 words)

  
 [No title]
A western variety of the Greek alphabet was carried by the Euboean Greeks to Italy, and the Etruscans acquired the alphabet from them.
And because much of their language is still not completely understood and the meanings of the words and grammar still not deciphered it is difficult to detail precisely where their other influences originated.
Greeks settled in the southern tip of the Italian Peninsula in the eighth and seventh centuries B.C.; Etruscans, Romans, and others inhabited the central and northern mainland.
lycos.cs.cmu.edu /info/etruscans.html   (657 words)

  
 Bryn Mawr Classical Review 94.02.19   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The earliest Greek goods (Euboean and Corinthian Middle Geometric pottery) belong to the first half of the 8th century B.C., but these are sherds from a dump (associated with native Apennine pottery) and theoretically might represent mere trade, a sort of "Euboean advance party" preceding actual settlement (R.'s modest interpretation).
It's often assumed that Greek emporia in the Levant preceded the Orientalizing period of Greece and the western migrations.
Since Greek cities in the homeland were not to observe universal standards of measurement for centuries to come, one may look to Phoenicians for this early enlightenment: confidence in the quality of traded goods was necessary to the operation of the consortium.
ccat.sas.upenn.edu /bmcr/1994/94.02.19.html   (2913 words)

  
 Greek Pottery from Tel Rehov and Iron Age Chronology
The Greek sherds, albeit a small assemblage, thus represent a significant contribution to the subject of the relationships between Greece and the Levant during the tenth-ninth centuries.
It remains to be seen whether the absence of Greek imports in Stratum III is typical of other horizons in the southern Levant as a possible consequence of these reverses.
It is clear, however, that the commercial energies of the Euboeans had recovered at least by the second half of the eighth century BCE, when their exports of LG pottery abound at Tyre and Al Mina.
www.rehov.org /Rehov/publications/index2.htm   (6710 words)

  
 Euboea
Both cities were Ionian settlements from Attica, and their importance in early times is shown by their numerous colonies in Magna Graecia and Sicily, such as Cumae, Rhegium and Naxos, and on the coast of Macedonia.
How great their commerce was is shown by the fact that the Euboic scale of weights and measures was in use in Athens until Solon, and among the Ionic cities generally.
At the conclusion of the Greek War of Independence, in 1830, the island constituted a part of the newly established Greek state.
www.ufaqs.com /wiki/en/eu/Euboea.htm   (1125 words)

  
 euboea - NumisWiki, The Collaborative Numismatics Project
That an island of the extent and importance of Euboea should have had no native currency during the period of her greatest colonizing and commercial activity is a proposition hardly to be entertained.
Chalcis and Eretria, from the dawn of history down to the close of the sixth century, were the two most enterprising cities in European Greece, as is shown by the large number of Chalcidian and Eretrian colonies on the coasts of Thrace, of Southern Italy, and of Sicily.
It cannot, however, be denied that among the numerous archaic and anepigraphic silver coins of Euboïc weight and of various types it is a matter of conjecture which belong to the Euboean towns, Chalcis, Eretria, Cyme, etc., and which are contemporary issues of other states in intimate commercial relations with Euboea.
www.forumancientcoins.com /NumisWiki/view.asp?key=euboea   (628 words)

  
 Electronic Antiquities Volume I, Number 3
When West admits that 'The Odyssey might well be a Euboean poem', (6) though 'the poet of the Iliad, to all appearance, lived in Asia Minor', he is driven onto the shoals of the dual-author theory of Homeric composition (though it is not clear that he notices this).
While other places in the Greek world after 750 BC may have offered a suitable setting for Homeric poetry, I have elsewhere argued in detail (8) that Homer belongs earlier, at 800-750 BC.
The Greek alphabet was a strange form of writing whose obsession with phonetic representation we have ourselves long ago abandoned, returning to writing's proper function as a system for thought parallel to but independent of natural language.
scholar.lib.vt.edu /ejournals/ElAnt/V1N3/powell.html   (2338 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
In Greek mythology, the Hesperides (Greek:) are nymphs who tend a blissful garden in a far western corner of the world, located near the Atlas mountains in Libya, or on a distant blessed island at the edge of the encircling Oceanus, the world-ocean.
According to the Sicilian Greek poet Stesichorus, in his poem the "Song of Geryon", and the Greek geographer Strabo, in his book Geographika (volume III), the Hesperides are in Tartessos, a location placed in the south of Iberia (Spain).
The Euboean Greek poet Hesiod said that the ancient name of Cádiz was Erytheia, another name for the Hesperides.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Hesperides   (1145 words)

  
 Ethics of Greek Politics and Wars 500-360 BC by Sanderson Beck
The 271 Greek war ships, which had retreated from Artemisium, returned there after the storm destroyed many Persian ships; but when they saw how many enemy ships remained, they refused to defend the Euboean strait until the Euboeans bribed Themistocles and the other generals with thirty talents.
Themistocles wisely advised the Greeks not to try to block the Persians' return, because it would prolong the war; he urged Greeks to repair their houses and sow their land, and playing both sides, sent a secret message of this to Xerxes.
With 13,000 Greeks and his own Persian army of 100,000 Cyrus, who proclaimed he envied the Greeks' liberty, led the troops east toward Pisidia; from there he said their objective was Syria.
www.san.beck.org /EC19-GreekWars.html   (19828 words)

  
 The Second Persian War
The Greeks gathered at Corinth in 481 BC to discuss strategy and what was to be done to defend Greece against the coming Persian invasion.
On September 22, 480BC, the Greek fleet held a position between the north coast of the Island of Salamis and the coast of Attica to the northwest of Piraeus.
A message was received from the Ionian Greeks in the summer of 479BC suggesting that if they were given the support of a fleet they would rise and revolt against the Persians.
www.inisfail.com /~ancients/second-persian-war.html   (3340 words)

  
 Orality, Literacy, & the Tradition   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A Euboean Greek of the early eighth century B.C., the adapter, in Powell's words, "took from a Phoenician informant an abecedarium and created from it his own system" (20) of writing.
The kings of the Greek Bronze Age counted scribes among their servants, but here too the application was restricted to terse summaries of the palace stores and brief orders to the soldiery.
One passage from Havelock stands as a precise anticipation of Powell: "The first new phenomenon caused by the invention of the alphabet was the preservation of non-didactic poetry composed for private occasions or on themes disconnected from the educational apparatus" (292).
mtprof.msun.edu /Spr2000/TBerto.html   (5742 words)

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